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Homegoing

de Yaa Gyasi

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
5,4762731,854 (4.27)526
"Two half sisters, Effia and Esi, unknown to each other, are born into two different tribal villages in 18th century Ghana. Effia will be married off to an English colonial, and will live in comfort in the sprawling, palatial rooms of Cape Coast Castle, raising half-caste children who will be sent abroad to be educated in England before returning to the Gold Coast to serve as administrators of the Empire. Her sister, Esi, will be imprisoned beneath Effia in the Castle's women's dungeon, and then shipped off on a boat bound for America, where she will be sold into slavery. Stretching from the tribal wars of Ghana to slavery and Civil War in America, from the coal mines in the north to the Great Migration to the streets of 20th century Harlem, Yaa Gyasi's has written a modern masterpiece, a novel that moves through histories and geographies and--with outstanding economy and force--captures the troubled spirit of our own nation"--… (mais)
Adicionado recentemente porliscosity, patl, combito, biblioteca privada, Rini55, sandramasters, lisah1058
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Gyasi uses the stories of multiple characters through the generations to tell the history of the slave trade on Ghana's Cape Coast and to illustrate generational trauma. This is the way history should be taught, in my opinion, but I did not enjoy Gyasi's style of dropping the reader into a new character's storyline years later and then backtracking to explain how they became who they are. It's an important history to tell but not a terribly pleasant one to read. ( )
  bookappeal | Feb 25, 2024 |
Never Ending Story

Media:Audio
Read by: Dominic Hoffman
Length: 13 hrs and 11 mins

Homegoing tells multiple stories from over 300years of Ghanian history through the eyes of fourteen people over seven generations and two continents, Africa and America.

The fourteen individuals are presented one by one, alternating between each branch of a family that splits between two Ghanaian nations.

The links between generations form two single strands from the huge binary tree whose root starts with one man and his progeny - the half-sisters raised separately. Subsequent generations are followed, two from each branch chosen from maternal or paternal lines with no apparent pattern.

Each generation-2 sister is given half of a black stone that is meant to be passed down to their children for generations. How this happens isn’t really dealt with but it’s no surprise that at least one half survives whole for 300 years.

At about generation-4 I started to lose track of the two branches of the family but did try to follow the stone. Admittedly this lack of pattern as to which two sub-branches would be in the next two chapters made the book interesting. I was forced to concentrate. Who had the stone? Who married who in the previous generation? What happened to the other children? I never knew who would pop up in the next chapters.

To add to the morass, there are multiple time shifts per chapter. I started counting them for interest. In at least one chapter time shifts within a single paragraph. While listening to Ness reminisce about her life, time shifts from her “present” situation to her early childhood memories, both presented “in the moment”. Later in Harlem I was in an apartment with Willie and in the next sentence I’m with her and her father “H” from previous generation in Pratt City. Stories within stories ending in jumps to another story in another time and place.

But it’s not the time-shifts that are distracting, it the overuse of metaphors. There are paragraphs of them. I started seeing them multiply along with the expanding generation-tree. As Gyasi herself writes “The family is like the forest: if you are outside it is dense; if you are inside you see that each tree has its own position.”.

I could forgive the grating metaphors. However the book failed to grab me. Especially in the early slave scenes where descriptions didn’t capture the period or place adequately. Early descriptions such as that of life in the British slave dungeon lacked substance and I remained outside, never feeling that the events were real though knowing they were.

A mediocre novel, adequately written, worth the effort if you have the time and don’t mind a mountain of metaphors. ( )
  kjuliff | Feb 25, 2024 |
This debut novel traces the legacy of the emotional and economic damage slavery inflicted on eight generations of one African family from the Gold Coast over the course of 250 years. Gyasi, whose second novel, Transcendent Kingdom, I previously reviewed, brings readers a glimpse of the horrors of the institution of slavery in an intimate way as members of successive generations tell their tales of loss and survival on both sides of the Atlantic. The characters are the descendants of two sisters, Effia the Beauty, who is married off to a wealthy Englishman on the Gold Coast, and Esi, who is sold into slavery and crosses to America. While the stories serve as interesting vignettes that touch on major historical events in the Gold Coast (later Ghana) and the United States—Civil War, Reconstruction, the Great Migrations, the mass incarceration of Black men—while tackling some more personal trials—children ripped from parents by the slave trade, heroin addiction, chain gangs—I found myself wanting more of each of those stories, a little more of a link between one family member’s story and another’s. The jump was often abrupt. Nevertheless, an excellent read. ( )
  bschweiger | Feb 4, 2024 |
Homegoing is the story of two branches of a family tree with one sister being sold into slavery and taken to America and the other sister remaining in Ghana. The narrative alternates between the two lines, with each chapter being the story of the next descendant. I found this a very effective structure for telling the multigenerational family story, although I did appreciate the family tree at the beginning of the book. I wasn't sure how the author was going to tie things up at the end and was pleasantly surprised at how well it worked. Although some sections were of necessity difficult reading, and I wish I knew more Ghanaian history, Homegoing was a wonderful story and a stunning debut novel. ( )
1 vote labfs39 | Jan 18, 2024 |
So beautifully written I couldn’t put it down. Gyasi weaves the stories of several generations on both sides of the Atlantic as they were affected by the slave trade and slavery.
  MarjorieDT | Jan 1, 2024 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (17 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Yaa Gyasiautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Hoffman, DominicNarradorautor principalalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Bastia, ValeriaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Burton, NathanDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Damour, AnneTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Grube, AnetteTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Hoekmeijer, NicoletteTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Ravnhid, Louise ArdenfeltTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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Abusua te sε kwaε: sε wo wɔ akyire a wo hunu sε εbom; sε wo bεn ho a na wo hunu sε nnua no bia sisi ne baabi nko.

The family is like the forest: if you are outside it is dense: if you are inside you see that each tree has its own position.

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We believe the one who has the power. He is the one who gets to write the story. So when you study history, you must always ask yourself, Whose story am I missing? Whose voice was suppressed so that this voice could come forth. Once you have figured that out, you must find that story too. From there, you begin to get a clearer, yet still imperfect picture.
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"Two half sisters, Effia and Esi, unknown to each other, are born into two different tribal villages in 18th century Ghana. Effia will be married off to an English colonial, and will live in comfort in the sprawling, palatial rooms of Cape Coast Castle, raising half-caste children who will be sent abroad to be educated in England before returning to the Gold Coast to serve as administrators of the Empire. Her sister, Esi, will be imprisoned beneath Effia in the Castle's women's dungeon, and then shipped off on a boat bound for America, where she will be sold into slavery. Stretching from the tribal wars of Ghana to slavery and Civil War in America, from the coal mines in the north to the Great Migration to the streets of 20th century Harlem, Yaa Gyasi's has written a modern masterpiece, a novel that moves through histories and geographies and--with outstanding economy and force--captures the troubled spirit of our own nation"--

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