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The desire hunter : discovering the hidden…
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The desire hunter : discovering the hidden needs of consumers around the… (edição: 2016)

de Martin Lindström

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"Hired by the world's leading brands to find out what makes their customers tick, Martin Lindstrom spends 300 nights a year overseas, closely observing people in their homes. His goal: to uncover their hidden desires and turn them into breakthrough products for the world's leading brands. In a world besotted by the power of Big Data, he works like a modern-day Sherlock Holmes, accumulating small clues to help solve a stunningly diverse array of challenges. In Switzerland, a stuffed teddy bear in a teenage girl's bedroom helped revolutionize 1,000 stores, spread across twenty countries, for one of Europe's largest fashion retailers. In Dubai, a bracelet strung with pearls helped Jenny Craig offset its declining membership in the United States and increase loyalty by 159 percent in only a year. And in China, the look of a car dashboard led to the design of the Roomba vacuum - a great American success story. How? Lindstrom connects the dots in this globetrotting narrative that will fascinate not only marketers and brand managers, but anyone interested in the infinite variations of human behavior. The Desire Hunter combines armchair travel with forensic psychology into an interlocking series of international clue-gathering detective stories. It presents a rare behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to create global brands; and along the way, reveals surprising and counter-intuitive truths about what connects us all as humans"--… (mais)
Membro:sydsavvy
Título:The desire hunter : discovering the hidden needs of consumers around the world
Autores:Martin Lindström
Informação:New York City : St. Martin's Press, 2016.
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Etiquetas:to-read

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Small Data: The Tiny Clues That Uncover Huge Trends de Martin Lindstrom

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Exibindo 4 de 4
In an age of information overload, how do we navigate the highway and make good use of even a part of what we're exposed to? Or, how do we notice the things that we don't see? Martin Lindstrom thinks we need to pay attention to the small things and I thought he might be on to something. But I must disclose upfront that I do not buy into the specific small things he describes here. Much as when I read a book on some kind of psychology and find specificity incongruous, the small triggers that Lindstrom identifies in his anecdotes are certainly enlightening, but I cannot make the connection nor believe that there is an actual connection to the increased sales he claims. That I do not recall ever in my adult life being swayed by an ad might have something to do with that. I'm not a normal consumer, even if I possess normal consumer products...I own and use an iPhone and iPad not because they are intuitively easy to use (hardly) or stylishly designed (seriously?)...rather because my wife picked them once and it is inconvenient to switch now. So, in my mind, the rationale for marketing makes no sense.

And I would, of course, be wrong as I usually am. After all, billions are spent each year on marketing, so it must work, right? There is value here for any US company wishing to work into non-American markets. And for non-US companies wishing to market to Americans...

I totally agree that the small things that Lindstrom identifies and has shared here might well have some significance, but i think he's reaching...a lot. Did you know that "[g]enerally speaking, when toothbrushes stand in a holder, or a cup, or jar, their owners tend to be less sexually active than not."? I didn't. He observed that The clocks in practically every home, as well as most of the watches on women’s wrists, were five minutes ahead of time. In Arabic culture, there is no “good luck” number, but there are five pillars of Islam, suggesting to me that Saudi natives were compensating for some as-yet-undefined terror by creating a halo effect in their homes—a way of warding off bad luck or misfortune.WTH? (There're a lot of similar reaches in his other anecdotes.) What about this? "Someone once said that blue is the color of longing for the distances that we as humans can never reach." Oh, please. And he claims that addressing a national need for superstition and ritual helped boost beer sales in Brazil. Sure.

When Euro Disney opened, it didn't fare well. The managers brought in Lindstrom to "help reverse the park's downward spiral." He tied a decrease in church attendance to religion's inability to give believers transformation and thought that Euro Disney needed to re-infuse superstition onto their experience. So they handed out packets of pixie dust and had visitors close their eyes, make a wish, and scatter the dust on Sleeping Beauty's pond. And miraculously, patronage was up. True story. Now, Lindstrom says the best person to observe a culture is one not from that culture, and I agree. I'm not a marketer, so the me who looks at that scenario comes to a much different conclusion... The park was more fun. The employees had fun, so people had fun, and it became the fun place it was expected to be. Or...it could be filling a superstitious need. I think William of Ockham might agree with me rather than Lindstrom. Whatever...it worked.

Now, as to the outsider observer...he's a Dane and in one section, nails Americans:At social events and parties, the topics of sex, politics and religion are all off-limits. (In fact, a lot of what goes on in America is off-limits—or at least too risky to raise in polite company.) Few Americans are willing to discuss things everyone knows but won’t admit—from how tedious it is to stay home all day with a baby, to their true feelings about hip-hop, to how they feel about sex. [...] What’s most striking about mainstream American humor is that it focuses on much of the material they won’t talk about over dinner. Visit any comedy club, or watch Bridesmaids, Curb Your Enthusiasm, The Simpsons, South Park, Family Guy or Louis CK’s routines on YouTube, and you’ll realize that Americans pay comedians millions of dollars to talk about things most of them have felt, or thought, but never said in public. [...]From what I could tell, most Americans were so accustomed to their regulated, rule-bound status they barely noticed the restrictions to their freedom.

I need to qualify my disdain, for I do think a lot of what he says and observes does make sense, if not for the reasons he thinks. For example: From watching ESPN, I’d learned about the power of information bombardment. ESPN strafes its viewers with an almost hysterical amount of data and details. Scrolling boxes. Panels. Bars. Graphics. Multi-angle camera perspectives. When exposed to a surfeit of data, men tend to feel more masculine and in command. Do most men bother to decipher these boxes, panels, bars and graphics? No—but that’s not really the point.To sell something, particularly to Americans, especially to Americans, flash it up. More features, more gadgets, faster transitions.

What's missing in this are Lindstrom's failures. And he obviously has had to have some. Where are the Small Data guesses and associated misses? Lindstrom does talk about how he was missing somethings in the lead up to his brilliant breakthroughs, but always in support of one more piece of Small Data. But no one, really...no one... has a 100% track record. I'd like to hear more of where his wild theories didn't hold.

Even if I don't agree with his reasoning, whatever he does seems to work; at least for the stories he told here. My takeaways are of a real life Sherlock Holmes approach to observation: see and observe as much as possible. There may be connections to something you are working on.
  Razinha | May 23, 2017 |
I put this on my TBR list as soon as I heard it was coming. I respect Martin Lindstrom--he's well marketed and I've read Brandwashed and Buyology and while neither was life-altering, both showcased solid thinking.

So...I work with small data also, so I have an appreciation for it and powerful insights that can be drawn through patterns of small observations. Like him, I agree that big data doesn't spark insight and it favors analysis over emotion. I agree about the value of building anticipation and it being a lost art at the pursuit of delivering instant gratification. His point about respect brands versus loved brands...that's really smart and articulated well.

No question the author is bright, resourceful, and gifted; however, this book missed the mark for me.

With this book, his thinking has become a little too black box. Some of the conclusions he draws are a little mystifying as he goes from a to q without connecting dots. There's a sort of magical thinking here that touches closely to lack of logical discipline. We're to take his conclusions and truths as evident because he says so; however, there's no real way for the reader (or his clients) to challenge him because his truths are based on what he spots. And what he spots are small pieces of data that others typically miss or disregard as unimportant.

There were a couple of times where it was hard to figure out why he landed on a conclusion he did. With the evidence and observations shared, there could be several other valid hypotheses. For a natural storyteller, I wished for a little more meat to the story...a little more string to tie his thoughts together.

Glad I didn't buy it.

If you're looking for people who think differently and are challenger thinkers, I highly recommend either Grant McCracken's Culturematic or Rohit Bhargava's Non-Obvious. Both are genius, loaded with ideas and fresh thinking and both are generous with sharing how they got there. ( )
  angiestahl | Mar 29, 2016 |
Interesting information but the book itself is flawed by not enough conclusions reached from the mountains of data and a narrative voice that feels a bit know-it-all. ( )
  Brainannex | Jan 31, 2016 |
It takes an outsider

When Martin Lindstrom comes for a visit, watch out. He will examine, note and ponder absolutely everything, from hand gestures to wall décor and even the toilet water. He never knows what will inspire some eureka moment that he can apply to a client’s brand and make it a winner. He does this 300 days a year, visiting multiple countries every month. He lives and breathes ethnography (“Culture Scans”). And he goes in with no preconceived notions of what he expects to learn. Major brands all over the world, on every continent, hire him to find out what they can do to make their brands better, and what off the wall recommendation he is going to make to achieve it.

Lindstrom weaves thousands of offbeat facts and surprising observations into the story of how he does his job - watching consumers in their own environments around the world. It forces him to decide why one culture does something but another does it differently. Why fridge magnets are placed low in Russia, high in Saudi Arabia, and to pin photos in the USA.

His outsider perspective is evident in this sampling of findings on Americans:
-Americans have so many taboo subjects, they pay standup comics millions to discuss what people in other countries consider ordinary conversation.
-Americans name ketchup and mayonnaise as fresh foods
-Americans are among the least free people in the world. Everything, all day, is regulated, from building shapes to security services.
-The sameness of everything everywhere has a numbing effect. There is nothing surprising or natural.
-Everything is restricted “for your safety”. Even cotton swabs come with specific warnings.
-Americans don’t like to touch or be touched by others. And don’t stand too close, either.
-Women in particular constantly try to relive childhood in the things they collect and surround themselves with.
-Americans chat with strangers in elevators to assure each other they are not a threat.
-Americans barely walk, compared to anyone else. Fear keeps housewives and children home.
-Life in the USA is shaped by fear: fear of offending, of being inappropriate, of starting a fight, of being robbed, abducted, attacked, shot or killed. Lindstrom says he has not come across a population more fearful than Americans.

Then consider this discovery for a central European clothing chain. Lindstrom found that girls get up earlier now. Their phone bills say they’re back at it before 6:30. And that they take an average of 17 bathroom selfies every morning. They share proposed outfits with friends, so everyone can look cool for school. Lindstrom took this concept to the clothing store. He implemented full length mirrors that turn into internet cameras with one click. Girls now try on clothes and post directly to Facebook with a full length selfie. The response has been phenomenal – a new life for the bricks and mortar store.

This is a ringing endorsement of small data, as opposed to massive data warehouses, with their statisticians and armies of interpreters. Lindstrom can come to a clearer conclusion in a day than a department of big data analysts can in a month. The reason is humans are involved. Their inner selves, inner feelings, unconscious actions, cultural guidelines and ulterior motives all play into who they are, what they value and how they will react.

Right from the first page, Small Data jumps out as refreshing, unique insights, dramatic findings, and wonderful inspirations. It is a totally engrossing read.

David Wineberg ( )
  DavidWineberg | Nov 25, 2015 |
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"Hired by the world's leading brands to find out what makes their customers tick, Martin Lindstrom spends 300 nights a year overseas, closely observing people in their homes. His goal: to uncover their hidden desires and turn them into breakthrough products for the world's leading brands. In a world besotted by the power of Big Data, he works like a modern-day Sherlock Holmes, accumulating small clues to help solve a stunningly diverse array of challenges. In Switzerland, a stuffed teddy bear in a teenage girl's bedroom helped revolutionize 1,000 stores, spread across twenty countries, for one of Europe's largest fashion retailers. In Dubai, a bracelet strung with pearls helped Jenny Craig offset its declining membership in the United States and increase loyalty by 159 percent in only a year. And in China, the look of a car dashboard led to the design of the Roomba vacuum - a great American success story. How? Lindstrom connects the dots in this globetrotting narrative that will fascinate not only marketers and brand managers, but anyone interested in the infinite variations of human behavior. The Desire Hunter combines armchair travel with forensic psychology into an interlocking series of international clue-gathering detective stories. It presents a rare behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to create global brands; and along the way, reveals surprising and counter-intuitive truths about what connects us all as humans"--

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