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Bread, Wine, Chocolate: The Slow Loss of…
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Bread, Wine, Chocolate: The Slow Loss of Foods We Love (edição: 2016)

de Simran Sethi (Autor)

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762269,579 (3.4)4
"Bread, Wine, and Chocolate, part journey to six continents in pursuit of delicious and endangered tastes, part investigation of the loss of biodiversity from soil to plate, tells the story of what we are losing, how we are losing it, and the inspiring people and places that are bringing back the foods we love. Award-winning journalist Simran Sethi travels from wild coffee forests in Ethiopian to cocoa plantations in Ecuador, from the brewery to the bakery to the temple, in order to meet scientists, farmers, chefs, wine makers, beer brewers, coffee roasters, chocolate connoisseurs, bakers, and many more to explore the reasons behind four developing monodiets in order to savor and save the foods we love."--jacket… (mais)
Membro:kobzar1960
Título:Bread, Wine, Chocolate: The Slow Loss of Foods We Love
Autores:Simran Sethi (Autor)
Informação:HarperOne (2016), Edition: Illustrated, 352 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Bread, Wine, Chocolate: The Slow Loss of Foods We Love de Simran Sethi

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A pity. Good information that appears to be stuffed into a mish-mash of the book. A look at the disappearance of some of the "staples" of our diets sounded fascinating. Loss of bread, wine or chocolate? Uh oh.
 
Sethi explores the human connection to a small group of foods (others are octopus, beer and coffee). The taste, the histories behind these foods, the memories they can evoke. How we created/harvest them, how and in what quantity they are consumed, how they are disappearing, etc.
 
At least, that's what the book was supposed to be about that. Instead, as other reviews note, the author is all over the place. It is far too many topics in one book. We also get snippets of her experiences/memories/thoughts about these foods too. But the topics run back forth and it felt more like a breathless run through all of these foods without being able to really learn and latch on to what the author was trying to say.
 
It is, in fact, difficult to know what the author is saying. I would personally jot it down to the fact that she's a journalist. Nothing wrong with that, but journalists who write books rarely translate well for me. Unlike some of the others I did like some of her personal stories where she talked about foods and what they meant to her, including how excited she was when a McDonald's opened near her in India or how a food brought her back to her grandmother's cooking. That said, I understand why people felt her writing was far too self-centered and unappealing.
 
It's a pity. I bought this because the library didn't have it but it was a waste. However, for the right person or for someone who knows little about this field it might be an interesting read. Would really recommend the library though. It's not a book to keep. ( )
  HoldMyBook | Feb 11, 2018 |
What's not to like? Wine, Chocolate, Coffee, Beer, and Bread? (Plus one more that I'll get to...)

Sethi breaks each examination into three parts...a mix of her personal history with the food and historical history (wasn't sure how else to put that); looks at sourcing and the impacts of high yield hybrids and strains on the higher quality beans, grains, yeasts, grapes, etc. - loss of diversity; and a short section on how the experts suggest enjoying each. She does a good job telling the story of the small farmers, vintners, chocolatiers "operating on the slimmest og magins", trying to make a living.

I liked most of what Sethi wrote, highlighting a few quote-worthy segments...

On cacao, Colin Gasko of Rogue Chocolatier, who pays premium prices for premium cacao seeds/beans that he has to have shipped, by more costly air, with their shells intact...a 30% waste as the shells are not the cacao he needs, and resulting in low margins:...there's a greater likelihood of reduction in genetic diversity if we don't value a differentiated, specialty market. My value isn't in purchasing power; it's in showing the potential of what good cacao processed in the right way can taste like.
On coffee, Sethi quotes Aaron Wood, former head roaster for Seven Seeds Coffee Roasters in Australia:I love coffee because it's for the people. It's social. You wouldn't go out for a bar of chocolate, would you? People drink wine to get out of their day and get into their night, Coffee brings you into your day.
On beer, Ms. Sethi says of the tragic species of beer (my term, not hers), "[a]ppropriately known as bottom-fermenting yeast, lager yeasts produce clean and crisp beers, like Corona, Heineken, Bud and Pabst Blue Ribbon. They are considered more commercial because they're uniform, controllable and don't produce the depth of flavor we find in ales." Well, she got that right. and quoting Ben Ott, former head brewer at Truman's brewery, London, If you want to attract a lot of people, then you make the beer as bland as possible.Ms. Sethi nails it with, "It works: Lager is the most popular beer in the world."

The subtitle refers to that loss of diversity, resulting in loss of quality. Think about it...junk chocolate vs gourmet chocolate; Folgers vs Ethiopian Yirgacheffe coffee; Budweiser vs actual beer...Ms. Sethi quotes Caleb Taft, at the time a wine director who introduced her to a specialty grape in a wine called Trousseau Gris:The intention behind big wines is consistency."
Meaning the Beringer's etal...but it's more than that. The intention behind ALL big markets is consistency: beer, chocolate, coffee...and we all lose because of that.

I thought Ms. Sethi threw in the proverbial TMI about her personal relationships in her narrative a little too often. I'm not sure if she was trying to make a connection with the reader, but given the subjects (and my personal passion for three - chocolate, coffee and beer), that connection would likely be a given for any reader. For her exposure of the problems we face when we allow a declination to the lower denominators of the Big producers, this could be a five star book, but I don't think she made enough of a case. Plus, she added a sixth "food" at the end that put me off; she crowed about a particularly well cooked octopus dish she had in Peru. She followed that travesty with an appropriate segment on overharvesting the sea resulting in, again, loss of diversity, but the damage was done in her sharing her delight in eating such an disturbingly intelligent creature.

Regardless, this is still a good book with good information about foods that I happen to like. ( )
  Razinha | Jul 10, 2017 |
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"Bread, Wine, and Chocolate, part journey to six continents in pursuit of delicious and endangered tastes, part investigation of the loss of biodiversity from soil to plate, tells the story of what we are losing, how we are losing it, and the inspiring people and places that are bringing back the foods we love. Award-winning journalist Simran Sethi travels from wild coffee forests in Ethiopian to cocoa plantations in Ecuador, from the brewery to the bakery to the temple, in order to meet scientists, farmers, chefs, wine makers, beer brewers, coffee roasters, chocolate connoisseurs, bakers, and many more to explore the reasons behind four developing monodiets in order to savor and save the foods we love."--jacket

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