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All Things Cease to Appear de Elizabeth…
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All Things Cease to Appear (edição: 2017)

de Elizabeth Brundage (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
4913039,058 (3.77)24
Arriving home to find his wife murdered and their toddler left alone, art history professor George Clare is targeted with suspicion by a relentless police officer as dark community secrets are revealed over a span of decades.
Membro:Slapco_Fudd
Título:All Things Cease to Appear
Autores:Elizabeth Brundage (Autor)
Informação:Vintage (2017), Edition: Reprint, 464 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:***
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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All Things Cease to Appear de Elizabeth Brundage

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» Veja também 24 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 30 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
A book which, once entered, is difficult to leave. There will be quibbles about quotation marks (none) and cavils about the ending (rushed in comparison to the unhurried pages that precede it) but it is a story told with all the trimmings, satisfying and true to the many genres it touches upon. NOTE: There ARE ghosts but, if that is strictly your attraction to this book, you may be disappointed. ( )
  Lemeritus | Jun 21, 2021 |
I actually did enjoy this but it was a little hard to get into at times. There were times I couldn't stop reading and other times I would have rather read something else. I did like that I was pretty sure I knew who the guilty party was, but yet, I could see how several other people couldn't have been the murderer. I felt that it had a good ending and I was satisfied! It's also told in the point of view of many people in the community so at times it was a little hard to tell who's view it was. It's a pretty dark story.

I received this courtesy of the First To Read program in exchange for my honest review. ( )
1 vote vickimarie2002 | Feb 19, 2020 |
After reading some of the other reviews of this book, I'm glad I listened to the audio version. The lack of quotation marks did not interfere with my enjoyment, although some of the chararacter transitions took a minute or two for me to catch up with. There is a great deal of sadness conveyed with the Cole family losing their farm and parents, Justine's accident, plus the murder of Katherine Clare going unsolved for 20 some years. However, the descriptions of the area and townsfolk drew me in and kept me listening late into the night. There were twists and surprises that kept me guessing, even though I was pretty sure I knew what was going on. ( )
  terran | Dec 29, 2019 |
One of those stories where you know most of the end at the beginning.

The rest of the book fills in the parts between with a switching perspective between married couple Catherine and George, and towards the end, their daughter Frannie.

It's a subtle twist on the haunted house format. Here, it's the adults who are haunted (from the outside, we'll never know the ghosts in a marriage or the personal demons people are contending with is kind of the idea) and how that affects the kids growing up in their care.

It reminded me a bit of Patricia Highsmith's, The Talented Mr. Ripley.

Opinions on the ending vary, but I thought the resolution was satisfying overall. Poetic, if not actual, justice is served.

Subtle and artful - recommended. ( )
  angiestahl | Aug 23, 2019 |
It's part murder mystery and part ghost story. It is also a close look at how guilt from the past affects the present and the future...and how what we often want is not what we sometimes get. We learn early on in the story that it’s not only houses that can be haunted...but people also. The novel asks so many questions that can't always be answered without lots of thought such as how well can we really know anyone? Is there even such a thing as evil? Does the spirit or energy last and thrive after death? And maybe the most important...how do we ever heal from violence and loss? It's a read that can only be described as riveting and absorbing. ( )
  Carol420 | Jun 9, 2019 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 30 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
...as much as anything, this is a character sketch: of a marriage, a sociopath, a family destroyed by the economy, the things we do for love — all finely drawn within the confined environment of a creaking old farmhouse on a homestead in a town far, far away.... All of the [characters] are sympathetic and suspicious in equal measure, a result of Brundage’s ability to peel away the onionskin layers of emotion that define any relationship. As the clues accumulate and the killer is revealed, the truth becomes both horrifying and inevitable. In the end, justice is done and redemption found, though not as one might expect, which makes the book all the more satisfying.
adicionado por Lemeritus | editarNew York Times, Vanessa Friedman (Web site pago) (Jun 1, 2016)
 
A book as lyrically written, frequently shocking and immensely moving as Elizabeth Brundage’s “All Things Cease to Appear” transcends categorization. Is the book a “police procedural”? In part. A “gothic mystery”? Incidentally. A novel of “psychological suspense”? In spades. A chilling case-study of a serial soul-killer? A “Spoon River”-style panorama of small-town life in upstate New York in the late 1970s? A parable of good and evil informed by the theological notions of the 18th-century Swedish mystic Emanuel Swedenborg? Yes, yes and yes. It was, perhaps, for such extraordinary books that the term “literary thriller” was coined.
adicionado por Lemeritus | editarWall Street Journal, Tom Nolan (Web site pago) (Apr 1, 2016)
 
ALL THINGS CEASE TO APPEAR is an expertly crafted thriller, with vivid, dramatic set pieces (a car chase on a dark country road; an ominous nighttime boat ride) that seem ready for the big-screen treatment. But it’s also a skilled and intelligent work of literary fiction.... ALL THINGS CEASE TO APPEAR is as insightful as it is suspenseful. Brundage’s thoughtful exploration of how people find themselves trapped in lives that don’t seem quite their own won’t satisfy all readers, especially those looking for a more traditional thriller. But those as interested in unraveling the mysteries of the human heart as they are in figuring out whodunit won’t be able to put this book down.
adicionado por Lemeritus | editarBookReporter, Megan Elliott (Mar 9, 2016)
 
Here’s the thing about creepy old farmhouses: they’re full of ghosts, and ax murderers lurk in the tree line.... There’s no shortage of suspects on the mortal plane, to say nothing of the supernatural. Part procedural, part horror story, part character study, Brundage’s literate yarn is full of telling moments: George is like a “tedious splinter” in Catherine’s mind, while George dismisses her concerns that maybe they shouldn’t be living in a place where horrible things have happened with, “As usual, you’re overreacting.” But more, and better, Brundage carries the arc of her story into the future, where the children of the nightmare, scarred by poverty, worry, meth, Iraq, are bound up in its consequences, the weight of all those ghosts, whether real or imagined, upon them forever.
adicionado por Lemeritus | editarKirkus Reviews (Dec 23, 2015)
 
Brundage’s (bestselling author of The Doctor’s Wife) searing, intricate novel epitomizes the best of the literary thriller, marrying gripping drama with impeccably crafted prose, characterizations, and imagery....Moving fluidly between viewpoints and time periods, Brundage’s complex narrative requires and rewards close attention. Succeeding as murder mystery, ghost tale, family drama, and love story, her novel is both tragic and transcendent.
adicionado por Lemeritus | editarPublishers Weekly (Dec 14, 2015)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (3 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Elizabeth Brundageautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Prinetti, CostanzaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Schaap, LucieTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Cole tried to pull them apart, but once they got going you couldn’t stop them, and he started to cry a little, and it felt stupid and good so he cried some more and it made them stop, and they got up off the ground and came over to him and tried to steady him and waited for him to calm down.
It wasn’t like you could just jump off the side of the earth and disappear. You had to figure out how to go on. That’s all you could do.
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People never said what they really meant and it always caused more trouble than it was worth. Eddy thought it was a defining characteristic of human beings. You didn’t find that kind of thing with animals. Sometimes, late at night, when it was very quiet, he’d imagine that all the words people never said, the true and honest ones, slipped out of their mouths and danced around wickedly over their stupid, sleeping forms.
It was just another part of the big fairy tale of America. If you wanted to see a real farm you’d have drunk, broke farmers and hungry animals worried for their lives. You’d have bitter wives and snot-nosed kids and old people broke down from giving their hearts and souls to the land.
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Arriving home to find his wife murdered and their toddler left alone, art history professor George Clare is targeted with suspicion by a relentless police officer as dark community secrets are revealed over a span of decades.

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