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Architects of Destiny (Cadicle, #1) de Amy…
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Architects of Destiny (Cadicle, #1) (edição: 2015)

de Amy DuBoff

Séries: Cadicle (1)

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568374,713 (3.04)2
For fans of "Dune", "Ender's Game", and "Star Wars" comes a new character-driven space opera...Cris Sietinen, heir to the most influential High Dynasty in the Taran empire, was born with rare telekinetic gifts--abilities he refuses to ignore, regardless of the governing Priesthood's decrees. Determined to be true to himself, and test the limits of his prohibited abilities, sixteen-year-old Cris escapes his stifled life of business and politics on Tararia to begin a new life exploring the stars.When Cris unexpectedly receives an invitation to join the Tararian Selective Service (TSS), the only organization to offer a sanctioned telekinesis training program, a new future awaits. It's his dream opportunity to be among people like himself, free from the Priesthood and political objectives. Except, Cris' path was designed, and he's right where the Priesthood wants him.Architects of Destiny is the first installment in the complete, seven-book Cadicle series, a modern-day space opera epic in the spirit of Heinlein, Herbert, and McCaffrey. This fast-paced space adventure with intrigue, coming-of-age, and romance is a short prequel to the defining events in Tararia's history in the ensuing years.… (mais)
Membro:marina042
Título:Architects of Destiny (Cadicle, #1)
Autores:Amy DuBoff
Informação:BDL Press, Kindle Edition, 166 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:*
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Architects of Destiny de Amy DuBoff

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The title of this book is extremely accurate. Reading this really feels like reading about the process of an architect – it’s extremely slow, nothing exciting happens, and in the end everything works out all the time.

I read 50% of this book and then skimmed to 60% before I decided I wouldn’t finish it. It’s just too goddamn boring to deal with the last 40%. Let’s break down some of the sections of this blueprint of boringness, shall we?

1) The hero is as boring as stale bread.

Cris Sietinen is the heir of one of the six big corporations that, together with the ominous ‘Priesthood’ make up the government of the world this story is set in. He is the second-born, but his older brother died, and apparently he felt like his parents are bitter over having him instead of his older brother as their heir, especially because he has telepathic/telekinetic abilities. So far so good. There is a lot of potential for anger and conflict and what do I know here – but the author just doesn’t really do anything with it. Cris knows that everybody else is wrong and that he should be allowed to use his powers. He knows that his parents are wrong. He runs away because he wants to ‘find himself’, something I have literally never heard any 16-year-old say, and of course he knows his way around everywhere pretty much instantly. He never really feels any negative feelings about where his story takes him, and while he does make a nice speech about how the Priesthood shouldn’t rule everybody, he has plenty few conflicted feelings about eventually returning to his family to pick up where he left off. Nothing ever really goes wrong for him. Which brings us to:

2) There are no actual setbacks. Like, at all.

Interesting stories are stories of failures, and of people trying to deal with circumstances that threaten to overpower them. There is nothing of that here. Maybe there’s a vague sense of threat at the beginning, but even that is harmless – so he doesn’t get to train his abilities while he keeps living in luxury, big fucking deal. So he tries to run away, and nothing goes wrong. He gets to the space port with hardly anything even complicating it. He finds a ship that will take him no problem. The people on that ship are nice, hard-working space merchants who don’t deal with illegal shit, great.

And then there’s all these conflict-teases that never really lead to anything worth reading.

Example: Suddenly Cris wakes up and the alarm of the ship is on. He floats through the air, coughs up his last meal, then floats through the ship – and turns out it’s only been a bit of friendly hazing instead of, say, pirates taking over the ship. Then he manages to get himself lost in the seedy part of a bigger space station. He nearly gets sold off into slavery – but nah, he manages to escape, all on his own, with not even a hair out of place. Later he gets attacked by an assassin sent by the Priesthood, who allegedly is the most powerful organization in all the universe, but honestly, a chimp with a gun would have had a better chance at actually killing anyone than that bloke. Even with a blaster-equivalent being fired off in his face, Mighty Cris of course doesn’t get a stretch – instead he activates his super special powers and the assassin runs off like a kicked dog.

3) If the hero is stale bread, the other characters are month-old rice crackers.

Seriously, all the side characters are basically there to transport Cris from point A to B, to act as an info terminal on two legs or to point out to him how special and powerful and unusual he is. Even the guy he spends a year with on board of a cargo ship stays what is basically a cut-out of your average sea dog In Space. Nobody but Cris has any backstory worth mentioning, nobody has any ambitions that don’t revolve around Cris, nobody has any negative feelings towards him.

Snore.

4) This might just as well be a thesis on the interior design of space ports.

About 20% of this book is an info dump delivered by the cardboard cut-outs that one might call side characters, 10% are Cris thinking the obvious or having inner monologues in very distracting and useless italic, and 70% are descriptions of every single goddamn space port and space base and other space space that Cris visits. I literally don’t need to know what color the crossbars at a tiny space port are. Seriously. It’s not that interesting.

5) Antagonist? What Antagonist?

So I guess you could call the Priesthood the antagonist? But not really, because they have ‘plans’ for Cris? Or maybe his father is the antagonist – but he’s literally not showing up anymore after 5% of the book. Or maybe the anti-telepath sentiment of this world is an antagonistic force? Well, could have been if his telepathic/telekinetic powers would not always work out to his advantage. Even when we enter the extremely boring training segments (from the 50 to 60% point) the author doesn’t even give us the curtsy of a school-yard villain or a disapproving mentor. Nah, everybody thinks Cris is just the bee’s knees. And if he tells them he’s not, he’s told that his humility is going to bring him far.

I’m still giving this book two stars because it was not offensive or bad enough to warrant one star. It just was… not really anything.

At the risk of repeating myself:

Snore.
  LadyLudovica | Sep 20, 2021 |
Fairly interesting read. The main character has psi powers, and can read other's thoughts, however this is frowned on by the priesthood. He plots to run away from home to try to join up with the TSS who can teach him this skill.
Full of interest and intrigue, this book held my interest from front to back! ( )
  daleala | Nov 28, 2019 |
It's a quick read. it took me less than two hours... in some ways it's a very standard read. That said, the characters are well written and engaging. Telepathy and Telekinesis is handled far better than in many books. ( )
  Douglas_K | Feb 16, 2018 |
Overall, I'd rate this as a meh book. It couldn't seem to decide what it wanted to do, so tried to do everything.

I'm thinking the first two and a half chapters could have been dropped, starting the story much later, but it would mean a much better story. I'd do this become of some poor word choices, a very definite information dump -- complete with lantern to spotlight it, and bad order of plot points.The characters have little to no personality. The story line really doesn't have much to pry it out of the miasma of other similar stories. Okay, yes, this author tried to do more with telekinesis than others, but everyone is poking at the powers of the brain of late.

The book seemed to improve as I reached chapter 6 and I didn't struggled as much as I had the first two and a half to three chapters. I find less to snark about. The characters haven't really improved, the story line is still a mushy mess, and now I'm getting a "Everyone has a Hogwarts book" vibe. The romance story line feels forced and the main character feels rather stiff and stilted.

Over five years passes in this book, and too much feels rushed and glazed over. The romance especially. They go from meeting to being engaged in two months, but you get very little details regarding their courtship. Cris's year aboard the Exler is limited to a few chapters. It felt like the author couldn't decide on training school or space opera, so tried to wedge them both in.

Why did they include a glossary of terms at the end of the book? Nothing was that strange, if you read close enough...

Debatable if I get the next. ( )
  gilroy | Feb 4, 2018 |
So I was hoping this book was going to be a little bit like Terra E with espers and all that aaand, it's not. Really psychic powers don't even play all that much into this book other than Cris has them and he's really good at them. SO good he's the "chosen one" of being good with them.
I mean his powers don't even play into this so much that I even think the author at times forgot he had them like the scene in the ship store where he doesn't even use them to see if the people behind the counter are going to try and kidnap him.
The next problem I have with the book is that a lot of the secondary characters feel like props. Thom is there to basically tick off the "Spent time in a commoner spacecraft" box. Scott is the "Segue into the baby factory meetup" box and then there's Kate who is basically the baby factory. She doesn't really get any outstanding personality and is super in love with Cris. She of course gets mad at him when he reveals himself as High Dynasty, but that's quickly resolved and over with and they can get back to the baby making because that seems to be part of the major plot here is that they (of course) have a son who goes on to do things. At least the author has the sense of mind to realize that Cris having sex with Kate before telling her who he really was would be rape. Most authors think that shit is OK. So, she does get major credits for that...
However her views on women certainly aren't progressive, having the women in scoop necked tank tops and more form conforming clothes than the men. I mean it's written that Cris doesn't have coaching on girls and acts on instinct. Girls, you mean women, are human and I sure as hell hoped he'd have learnt how to treat fellow humans and second, instinct is that shitty excuse that men use when they rape women. They "can't help it" and all that bullshit. Really if he doesn't know what he's doing he could.. iunno... ASK

Overall the book is bland and things seem to happen simply for plot so there's not a lot of characterization going on. People are as flat as tables and nobody really has an outstanding personality. Not even Cris. That being said I did add a star just because the author had the decency to put on the brakes to Cris' love scene and have him go "That'd be wrong!"
You could probably compare this book to Phantasy Star III for the depth of characterization. ( )
  Maverynthia | Jul 29, 2017 |
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For fans of "Dune", "Ender's Game", and "Star Wars" comes a new character-driven space opera...Cris Sietinen, heir to the most influential High Dynasty in the Taran empire, was born with rare telekinetic gifts--abilities he refuses to ignore, regardless of the governing Priesthood's decrees. Determined to be true to himself, and test the limits of his prohibited abilities, sixteen-year-old Cris escapes his stifled life of business and politics on Tararia to begin a new life exploring the stars.When Cris unexpectedly receives an invitation to join the Tararian Selective Service (TSS), the only organization to offer a sanctioned telekinesis training program, a new future awaits. It's his dream opportunity to be among people like himself, free from the Priesthood and political objectives. Except, Cris' path was designed, and he's right where the Priesthood wants him.Architects of Destiny is the first installment in the complete, seven-book Cadicle series, a modern-day space opera epic in the spirit of Heinlein, Herbert, and McCaffrey. This fast-paced space adventure with intrigue, coming-of-age, and romance is a short prequel to the defining events in Tararia's history in the ensuing years.

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