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Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American…
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Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City (edição: 2017)

de Matthew Desmond (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
2,1271665,464 (4.43)1 / 409
"[The author] takes us into the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee to tell the story of eight families on the edge. Arleen is a single mother trying to raise her two sons on the 20 dollars a month she has left after paying for their rundown apartment. Scott is a gentle nurse consumed by a heroin addiction. Lamar, a man with no legs and a neighborhood full of boys to look after, tries to work his way out of debt. Vanetta participates in a botched stickup after her hours are cut. All are spending almost everything they have on rent, and all have fallen behind. The fates of these families are in the hands of two landlords: Sherrena Tarver, a former schoolteacher turned inner-city entrepreneur, and Tobin Charney, who runs one of the worst trailer parks in Milwaukee. They loathe some of their tenants and are fond of others, but as Sherrena puts it, "Love don't pay the bills." She moves to evict Arleen and her boys a few days before Christmas. Even in the most desolate areas of American cities, evictions used to be rare. But today, most poor renting families are spending more than half of their income on housing, and eviction has become ordinary, especially for single mothers. In vivid, intimate prose, Desmond provides a ground-level view of one of the most urgent issues facing America today. As we see families forced into shelters, squalid apartments, or more dangerous neighborhoods, we bear witness to the human cost of America's vast inequality-- and to people's determination and intelligence in the face of hardship. Based on years of embedded fieldwork and painstakingly gathered data, this masterful book transforms our understanding of extreme poverty and economic exploitation while providing fresh ideas for solving a devastating, uniquely American problem. Its unforgettable scenes of hope and loss remind us of the centrality of home, without which nothing else is possible"--Amazon.com.… (mais)
Membro:Beamis12
Título:Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City
Autores:Matthew Desmond (Autor)
Informação:Broadway Books (2017), Edition: Reprint, 448 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City de Matthew Desmond

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Mostrando 1-5 de 169 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City gripped me. Desmond's ethnographic story is not only instantly readable, but the scope of his work is immense-- likely because the issue itself is so immense. "Fewer and fewer families can afford a roof over their head. This is among the most urgent and pressing issues facing America today, and acknowledging the breadth and depth of the problem changes the way we look at poverty."(p. 5) Desmond gives an incredibly thorough and balanced view of the affordable housing crisis in this country. Exploring not only how it directly impacts the lives of those in poverty and their children, but also that of their landlords and society at large. What are the societal costs of accepting the status quo? Of allowing millions to live in such squalor; forcing human beings to eek out a living while being housing insecure? To accept that rents get to sky rocket while incomes stagnant and quality of housing diminishes? Desmond offers some insight. He writes, "This degree of inequality, this withdrawal of opportunity, this cold denial of basic needs, this endorsement of pointless suffering-- by no American value is this situation justified." (p. 313) He also offers some ideas for change. One such solution is increased protections for tenants through the legal system. The guaranteed right of counsel being an essential necessity for fairness. He also posits a common sense voucher program along with a call to reign in "exploitation." As he writes, "Exploitation thrives when it comes to the essentials, like housing and food." He cites high-interest payday loans, over draft fees, and student loans for for-profit colleges as examples. (p. 306) I appreciated Desmond's epilogue and chapter about the project at the end. I am wholly impressed by his work. Knowing that people are suffering daily without such a basic need as shelter or that many who have shelter are being asked to give 50%-90% of their income up for it, haunts me. I grew very invested in the people whose stories he shared. This book is an absolute must-read. He puts a real human face to a problem that often gets lost or over-looked in statistics or by blustering politicians making sweeping generalizations about people and poverty. My only disappointment while reading was that I had a library book and not my own copy that I could take a highlighter to and scribble notes in the margins, I ended up with many dog-eared pages as it was. ( )
  mbellucci | Apr 10, 2021 |
4.5*
This book was extremely educational about the lives of tenants who live in poverty in Milwaukee and their landlords as well. Matthew Desmond does a fabulous job of making you sympathetic and empathetic towards both landlords and tenants depending on who he was following around that day. Some of the stories had me so frustrated that I didn't want to continue listening during a certain time and left me feeling incredibly frustrated by both tenants' and landlords' situations on numerous occasions. I lost focus listening when there was a large number of facts and statistics related to tenant vs. landlord eviction and poverty. Because of that I feel like I need to dock 1/2 a star, but this makes me incredibly sympathetic, empathetic, and understanding of the students I have who either come from situations like this who have moved from inner city areas with families or who continue to live in situations like this in my own area. ( )
  courty4189 | Mar 24, 2021 |
Anyone interested in poverty in the US should put this book on their "must read" short list. Well researched, well written, and compelling. ( )
  SGTCat | Feb 25, 2021 |
Unrelenting, rigorous, heartbreaking, hopeless and also hopeful, if you can imagine that. This took a while to read only because I needed to read it in small doses. ( )
  giovannaz63 | Jan 18, 2021 |
This was a tough book. It seems that eviction in the inner cities is a feature of the system, not a bug. It's all about profits for the few. Apparently, this isn't a new problem. And it's a somewhat cyclical problem, eviction leads to instability, which leads to poverty, which leads to desperation, which leads to more eviction.

Basically, Desmond, embedded himself in a couple of different living situations and followed the lives of landlords and tenants. This book describes their lives. It's pretty depressing, but we do need to know about this stuff so we can support public policies that would help alleviate all the suffering involved.

( )
  lgpiper | Jan 10, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 169 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
A shattering account of life on the American fringe, Matthew Desmond’s Evicted shows the reality of a housing crisis that few among the political or media elite ever think much about, let alone address. It takes us to the center of what would be seen as an emergency of significant proportions if the poor had any legitimate political agency in American life. ... The son of a working-class preacher, Desmond is an associate professor of social sciences at Harvard, and he did much of his research as he completed a Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin. Evicted recalls Studs Terkel’s searching representations of ordinary people in their jobs in his 1974 book, Working, and more recently, George Packer’s account of the disintegration of the social contract in The Unwinding in 2013.
adicionado por Lemeritus | editarThe New Republic, Brandon Harris (pay site) (Apr 12, 2016)
 
It has been a long time since a book has struck me like Desmond’s “Evicted,” not since Drew Gilpin Faust’s “This Republic of Suffering,” which showed how Americans dealt with their Civil War dead. I suspect the resonance is not coincidental. Desmond, a sociologist at Harvard University, writes about another kind of mass death: The demise of opportunity and of hope that occurs when individuals are forced to leave their homes. ... “Evicted” does not traffic in tired arguments about racial pa­thol­ogies or family breakdown. Rather, Desmond identifies perverse market structures, destructive government policies and the cascade of misfortunes that comes with losing your home. ... “Evicted” is an extraordinary feat of reporting and ethnography. Desmond has made it impossible to ever again consider poverty in America without tackling the central role of housing — and without grappling with “Evicted.”
adicionado por Lemeritus | editarThe Washington Post, Carlos Lozada (pay site) (Mar 3, 2016)
 
“Evicted” is a regal hybrid of ethnography and policy reporting. It follows the lives of eight families in Milwaukee, some black and some white, all several leagues below the poverty line. Mr. Desmond, a sociologist and a co-director of the Justice and Poverty Project at Harvard, lived among them in 2008 and 2009. ... The result is an exhaustively researched, vividly realized and, above all, unignorable book — after “Evicted,” it will no longer be possible to have a serious discussion about poverty without having a serious discussion about housing. ... “If incarceration had come to define the lives of men from impoverished black neighborhoods,” Mr. Desmond writes, “eviction was shaping the lives of women. Poor black men were locked up. Poor black women were locked out.”
 

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Matthew Desmondautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Graham, DionNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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I wish the rent
was heaven sent.
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For Michelle, who's been down the line
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Jori and his cousin were cutting up, tossing snowballs at passing cars.
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If incarceration had come to define the lives of men from impoverished black neighborhoods, eviction was shaping the lives of women. Poor black men were locked up. Poor black women were locked out.
No one thought the poor more undeserving than the poor themselves.
A community that saw so clearly its own pain had a difficult time also sensing its potential.
What the chief failed to realize, or failed to reveal, was that his department's own rules presented battered women with the devil's bargain: keep quiet and face abuse or call the police and face eviction.
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"[The author] takes us into the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee to tell the story of eight families on the edge. Arleen is a single mother trying to raise her two sons on the 20 dollars a month she has left after paying for their rundown apartment. Scott is a gentle nurse consumed by a heroin addiction. Lamar, a man with no legs and a neighborhood full of boys to look after, tries to work his way out of debt. Vanetta participates in a botched stickup after her hours are cut. All are spending almost everything they have on rent, and all have fallen behind. The fates of these families are in the hands of two landlords: Sherrena Tarver, a former schoolteacher turned inner-city entrepreneur, and Tobin Charney, who runs one of the worst trailer parks in Milwaukee. They loathe some of their tenants and are fond of others, but as Sherrena puts it, "Love don't pay the bills." She moves to evict Arleen and her boys a few days before Christmas. Even in the most desolate areas of American cities, evictions used to be rare. But today, most poor renting families are spending more than half of their income on housing, and eviction has become ordinary, especially for single mothers. In vivid, intimate prose, Desmond provides a ground-level view of one of the most urgent issues facing America today. As we see families forced into shelters, squalid apartments, or more dangerous neighborhoods, we bear witness to the human cost of America's vast inequality-- and to people's determination and intelligence in the face of hardship. Based on years of embedded fieldwork and painstakingly gathered data, this masterful book transforms our understanding of extreme poverty and economic exploitation while providing fresh ideas for solving a devastating, uniquely American problem. Its unforgettable scenes of hope and loss remind us of the centrality of home, without which nothing else is possible"--Amazon.com.

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