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SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome de Mary…
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SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome (original: 2015; edição: 2016)

de Mary Beard (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3,061643,318 (4.14)121
Ancient Rome matters. Its history of empire, conquest, cruelty and excess is something against which we still judge ourselves. Its myths and stories - from Romulus and Remus to the Rape of Lucretia - still strike a chord with us. And its debates about citizenship, security and the rights of the individual still influence our own debates on civil liberty today. SPQR is a new look at Roman history from one of the world's foremost classicists. It explores not only how Rome grew from an insignificant village in central Italy to a power that controlled territory from Spain to Syria, but also how the Romans thought about themselves and their achievements, and why they are still important to us. Covering 1,000 years of history, and casting fresh light on the basics of Roman culture from slavery to running water, as well as exploring democracy, migration, religious controversy, social mobility and exploitation in the larger context of the empire, this is a definitive history of ancient Rome. SPQR is the Romans' own abbreviation for their state: Senatus Populusque Romanus, 'the Senate and People of Rome'.… (mais)
Membro:Laurence.Lai
Título:SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome
Autores:Mary Beard (Autor)
Informação:Liveright (2016), Edition: 1, 608 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:GNL-2075-0115

Detalhes da Obra

SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome de Mary Beard (2015)

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Inglês (60)  Italiano (1)  Catalão (1)  Espanhol (1)  Francês (1)  Todos os idiomas (64)
Mostrando 1-5 de 64 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I loved this book!
I feel like the history of Rome - the city, the Republic, and then the Empire - is only glazed over in history classes because of the sheer immensity of its timeline.
Mary Beard deftly tells readers the history of Rome in the best way possibly with available information.
It is a well written, well told history of a city that turned into an empire. ( )
  historybookreads | Jul 26, 2021 |
Excellent. Well written throughout. ( )
  brett.sovereign | Jul 10, 2021 |
A very well-written introduction to the history of Rome. Most of the book is spent on the pre-imperial portions of Rome's history, a choice that serves to help explore the traditions, structures and peoples of Rome rather than listing 'fun facts' about the emperors. ( )
  poirotketchup | Mar 18, 2021 |
The Rooman Empire still holds quite a sway in modern imaginations and culture. Gladiator and the tv show Rome are only two examples of its pop culture hold, and we still quote what may, or may not be, actual Roman lines. Rome is still important to us, and in this book, covering the beginnings of the empire up to the death (roughly) of Commodus, Beard shows the reader what it was like to live in Rome. This is a book about Rome the empire, but also Rome the people. What did it mean to be a Roman citizen?

SPQR: A History of Ancient RomeIt is an overview of the period, and it covers a huge swath of time, so don’t expect to be reading about every detail in the life of Augustus, or Claudius. And I think it works well if you have some familiarity with the history. Its been years and years since I studied anything about Rome, but that knowledge, hiding somewhere in my brain, certainly helped with my reading of this book.

Which isn’t to say that it is an overly academic book, it isn’t, it is a popular history book. And it is very readable. Almost too readable in parts, because, I don’t know about you, but for me, sometimes have a complex read forces me to slow down and take in the facts better than something that doesn’t need to be translated into words my brain understands.

It is also a book that is full of quotable lines, such as

It is a dangerous myth that we are better historians than our predecessors. We are not.

If you have an interest in Roman history, then this is a very good place to start, or even to continue. Although a word of warning, if you are anything like me when you are reading about good old Augustus you’ll be picturing the TV version, not to mention James Purefoy when Beard is talking about Marc Antony.

That is actually one of the things I really enjoyed about the book, how Beard shows us that all we think we know about Rome may not be true. And this goes double when talking about their enemies, or indeed the Romans that ended up on the wrong side of history themselves. That line about victors writing the history certainly comes into play. ( )
  Fence | Jan 5, 2021 |
A good one-volume history of Rome through the early third century. Self-consciously "revisionist", it goes out of its way to challenge and bolster traditional narratives with both archaeological evidence and applications of skepticism and common sense. She also uses these sources to illuminate what daily life was like, and to try to shed light on women, slaves and the non-rich, who are mostly marginalized in traditional Roman narratives.

Shaping all this is a vague theme about the extension of Roman citizenship to ever broader groups — but Beard never develops to the point it could be. She addresses this argument in passing a few times, and then returns to it briefly in an epilogue, but never engages fully with either the struggle or its consequences.

Don't make this your only look at Roman history, but if you've got a basic grounding (I'd recommend Mike Duncan's "The History of Rome" podcast for that if you've got a few hundred hours to burn) SPQR does a good job offering a new angle on familiar history.

(N.B.: I consumed this book in audiobook format, not in print, which might have shaped my experience.) ( )
  dhmontgomery | Dec 13, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 64 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
By the time Beard has finished, she has explored not only archaic, republican, and imperial Rome, but the eastern and western provinces over which it eventually won control. She deploys an immense range of ancient sources, in both Greek and Latin, and an equally wide range of material objects, from pots and coins to inscriptions, sculptures, reliefs, and temples. She moves with ease and mastery through archaeology, numismatics, and philology, as well as a mass of written documents on stone and papyrus.
 
"She conveys the thrill of puzzling over texts and events that are bound to be ambiguous, and she complicates received wisdom in the process."
adicionado por bookfitz | editarThe Atlantic, Emily Wilson (Dec 1, 2015)
 
You push past this book’s occasional unventilated corner, however, because Ms. Beard is competent and charming company. In “SPQR” she pulls off the difficult feat of deliberating at length on the largest intellectual and moral issues her subject presents (liberty, beauty, citizenship, power) while maintaining an intimate tone.
adicionado por eereed | editarNew York Times, Dwight Garner (Nov 17, 2015)
 
"SPQR is pacy, weighty, relevant and iconoclastic. Who knew classics could be so enthralling?"
 
Beard presents a plausible picture of gradual development from a community of warlords to an urban centre with complex political institutions, institutions which systematically favoured the interests of the upper classes yet allowed scope for the votes of the poor to carry weight. We may think of the Greeks as the great originators of western political theory, but Beard emphasises the sophistication of Roman legal thought, already grappling in the late second century BC with the complex ethical issues raised by the government of subject peoples.
adicionado por eereed | editarThe Guardian (UK), Catharine Edwards (Oct 28, 2015)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (3 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Beard, Maryautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Barabás, JózsefTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Bischoff, UlrikeTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Duran, SimonTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Dyer, PeterDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Furió, SilviaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gil, Luis ReyesTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Mertens, InekeTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Nygaard, AndersTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Piccato, AldoTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Radomski, NorbertTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Randmaa, AldoTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Weilguni, MarinaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Ancient Rome matters. Its history of empire, conquest, cruelty and excess is something against which we still judge ourselves. Its myths and stories - from Romulus and Remus to the Rape of Lucretia - still strike a chord with us. And its debates about citizenship, security and the rights of the individual still influence our own debates on civil liberty today. SPQR is a new look at Roman history from one of the world's foremost classicists. It explores not only how Rome grew from an insignificant village in central Italy to a power that controlled territory from Spain to Syria, but also how the Romans thought about themselves and their achievements, and why they are still important to us. Covering 1,000 years of history, and casting fresh light on the basics of Roman culture from slavery to running water, as well as exploring democracy, migration, religious controversy, social mobility and exploitation in the larger context of the empire, this is a definitive history of ancient Rome. SPQR is the Romans' own abbreviation for their state: Senatus Populusque Romanus, 'the Senate and People of Rome'.

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