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Alice (The Chronicles of Alice) de Christina…
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Alice (The Chronicles of Alice) (edição: 2015)

de Christina Henry (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
9154617,779 (3.7)9
"A mind-bending new novel inspired by the twisted and wondrous works of Lewis Carroll...In a warren of crumbling buildings and desperate people called the Old City, there stands a hospital with cinderblock walls which echo the screams of the poor souls inside. In the hospital, there is a woman. Her hair, once blond, hangs in tangles down her back. She doesn't remember why she's in such a terrible place. Just a tea party long ago, and long ears, and blood... Then, one night, a fire at the hospital gives the woman a chance to escape, tumbling out of the hole that imprisoned her, leaving her free to uncover the truth about what happened to her all those years ago. Only something else has escaped with her. Something dark. Something powerful. And to find the truth, she will have to track this beast to the very heart of the Old City, where the rabbit waits for his Alice"--… (mais)
Membro:Daxmunro
Título:Alice (The Chronicles of Alice)
Autores:Christina Henry (Autor)
Informação:Ace (2015), 304 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:*****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Alice de Christina Henry

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Mostrando 1-5 de 46 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Well, jeez. That was violent and grim and not at all what I would have planned on reading/listening to at this time of stress and anxiety and uncertainty, but dang, I really liked it. I also delayed reading this for five years because I knew this about the book and was a little afraid of it mangling one of my favorite stories, but--again--dang, I really liked it. ( )
  LibroLindsay | Jun 18, 2021 |
"Why are you here?" she asked one day, long after they were friends, or at least friends who never really saw each other.
"I killed a lot of people with an axe," he said. "That's how I got my name. Hatcher."
"What was your name before?" Alice asked. She was surprisingly undisturbed by the knowledge that her new friend was an axe murderer. It seemed unrelated to who he was now, the rough voice and grey eyes though the hole in the wall.
"I don't remember," he said.


What if Wonderland were not a pretty place in a little girl's dream? What if it were a real city with its own history, its own true laws, its own economics? What if those economics were fueled by power and greed, by the trade of magic and flesh? If the pretty story were pealed back to the primal things underneath, to lies and sex and broken trust, it would look something like this. A broken, dirty city where no one is really safe, where the Jabberwock is come again, and the only unlikely hope lies with two murderous lunatics escaped from the asylum.

I cannot stress enough that this is the story of a dark, ugly world. Rape is not so much something that happens in this story as it is a theme uniting the whole story from beginning to end. Men, all men, are darkened by the possibility that they will turn traitor and use their strength to commit the same crimes as the slavers and johns who fill the night. Yet women must have their protection, or they will be sold or taken. The redemption, the possibility of love, arises not out of the remittance of danger, but out of Alice's realization that she herself is also dangerous.

Alice's transformation from a broken, drug addled castoff into a a genuine heroine, one who can face the Jabberwock, is believable and real. Her changing relationship with Hatcher is also authentic. This is a deeply feminist story that leaves behind the slapstick kick-ass heroines* and watches its protagonist grow honestly out of her helplessness and into a woman who can stand on her own two feet. In many ways, it breaks and rearranges the stories of Wonderland and the Lookingglass so that instead of the nonsense adventures of a little girl, they become a real progression. As Alice moves from confrontation to confrontation with the bosses of the Old City, I saw her become the Red Queen, bloodied, yes, but also capable, able to protect others.

At the same time, the book doesn't offer any easy answers. Throughout, Alice meditates on how the City came to be as it is, her own relationship with her parents (especially her mother) and they way they abandoned her, the responsibility of strength and power, the dynamics of vulnerability and the way there is a cost to helping those her heart goes out to, and most of all the fact that she cannot help everyone.

This is a lot to pack into 300 pages, but the book never drags. I could have wolfed it down in a couple of sittings. (Really I did, but I stopped to reread [b:Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass|24213|Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass|Lewis Carroll|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1327872220s/24213.jpg|2375385]. I highly recommend a reread of the originals with this; having certain little details of the story fresh in mind was nice.) Also, the writing is gorgeous. (I'm saying that a lot this year, I know. I've read a lot of gorgeous stories!) Highly recommended.

*Don't get me wrong. I love my kick-ass heroines. But there is fantasy and then there is candy. This is not candy. I also tend to shy away from stories that are discernibly wrapped around feminism. This, however, was not a lecture, but a story that happened to deeply concern the power relationships between women and men. I very much liked the exploration.

(Reviewed March 2015) ( )
1 vote amyotheramy | May 11, 2021 |
A dark, adult version of Alice in Wonderland. No sex or anything like that but the abuse Alice had suffered in the past at the of various Wonderland characters is now than hinted at. But again, it's not written in an explicit, all the glory details way is handled very well.

This is the first in this series. The Red Queen is next, so I'll give it a go, especially since I discovered the Borrow Box app which allows me to borrow ebooks from the library(currently ~13,000 books available) at no cost at all.

Good read. Worth your time, especially if you like the original. ( )
  SFGale | Mar 23, 2021 |
Wow. That was an excellent retelling of Alice In Wonderland.

It's bloody, visceral and full on mind-bending. I love Alice. She's strong, but has serious doubts about herself at all the wrong times. She stomps across the pages only to get the precipice and experience profound fear.

The best part of the book is that she doesn't feel like the Mary-Sues of so much woman driven fictional work in the 21st century. Alice falls victim to the worst that society has to offer. Although she refuses to let it define her, it has a profound effect on her nonetheless. She allows herself to be emotionally carried by the Mad Hatcher at times. She realizes that his trauma is as deep as hers and that he expresses his in a very different way and he struggles with it from minute to minute. He is utterly insane and he needs her as much as she needs him. Both broken, they grow into their own private horrors. They see each other as complimentary beings rather than both being strong in the same ways. I love it.

The setting is a horror show of Victorian-Steam Punk-Gothic pieces arranged crazily into a city. Real people taken to their extremes in the setting that makes them grotesque parodies. The rich separated from the poor by a caste system that is brutally enforced. The enforcers consisted of the other Wonderland characters and their lackeys. The secondary characters are well written villains.

Starting to read The Red Queen right away. I'm excited to learn more about Alice's family and how she came to be. We know Hatcher's story and I hope to see the resolution in the end, but Alice must be the most important element in Red Queen. There's so much mystery surrounding her. I can't wait for more! ( )
  authenticjoy | Nov 15, 2020 |
But she wasn't a Magician, whatever Nell or Hatcher liked to believe. She was born to an ordinary family in an ordinary part of the New City. There had never been a hint of anything out of the way in their blood, not on her her mother's side or her father's. They were quiet and perfect and eminently respectable.
Except you, Alice thought.
You were not any of those things. That did not mean she was a Magician, though. It just meant that she didn't belong.
1 vote isabelx | Nov 15, 2020 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Christina Henryautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Sterlin, JennyNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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For Danielle Stockley, because you believed in Maddy and Alice and me
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"A mind-bending new novel inspired by the twisted and wondrous works of Lewis Carroll...In a warren of crumbling buildings and desperate people called the Old City, there stands a hospital with cinderblock walls which echo the screams of the poor souls inside. In the hospital, there is a woman. Her hair, once blond, hangs in tangles down her back. She doesn't remember why she's in such a terrible place. Just a tea party long ago, and long ears, and blood... Then, one night, a fire at the hospital gives the woman a chance to escape, tumbling out of the hole that imprisoned her, leaving her free to uncover the truth about what happened to her all those years ago. Only something else has escaped with her. Something dark. Something powerful. And to find the truth, she will have to track this beast to the very heart of the Old City, where the rabbit waits for his Alice"--

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813.6 — Literature American and Canadian American fiction 21st Century

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