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The Song Machine: How to Make a Hit de John…
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The Song Machine: How to Make a Hit (original: 2015; edição: 2015)

de John Seabrook (Autor)

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19010109,970 (3.72)2
There's a reason hit songs offer such guilty pleasure--they're designed that way. Over the last two decades a new type of hit song has emerged, one that is almost inescapably catchy. Pop songs have always had a "hook," but today's songs bristle with them: a hook every seven seconds is the rule. Painstakingly crafted to tweak the brain's delight in melody, rhythm, and repetition, these songs are highly processed products. Like snack-food engineers, modern songwriters have discovered the musical "bliss point." And just like junk food, the bliss point leaves you wanting more. In The Song Machine, longtime New Yorker staff writer John Seabrook tells the story of the massive cultural upheaval that produced these new, super-strength hits. Seabrook takes us into a strange and surprising world, full of unexpected and vivid characters, as he traces the growth of this new approach to hit-making from its obscure origins in early 1990s Sweden to its dominance of today's Billboard charts. Going beyond music to discuss money, business, marketing, and technology, The Song Machine explores what the new hits may be doing to our brains and listening habits, especially as services like Spotify and Apple Music use streaming data to gather music into new genres invented by algorithms based on listener behavior. Revelatory and original, this book will change the way you listen to music.--Adapted from book jacket.… (mais)
Membro:rsanek
Título:The Song Machine: How to Make a Hit
Autores:John Seabrook (Autor)
Informação:Jonathan Cape (2015), Edition: First Edition First Printing, 336 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:to-read, goodreads_import

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The Song Machine: Inside the Hit Factory de John Seabrook (2015)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 10 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Don't Believe Everyone Who Says They Write Their Own Songs

John Seabrook does a great job pulling the veil back on the music industry and how hits get made. It's astonishing to read that today's hit songs are produced, written, and created by teams of people and that the "factories" have their hands on 90% of the hits out there.

You'll never look at an artist or listen to music the same way after reading this book. ( )
  danjrosenbaum | Oct 29, 2020 |
Terrifying. ( )
  lightkensei | May 17, 2020 |
The music industry is a strange beast. Not only is it fickle and flighty, but it has changed dramatically from even twenty years ago. Gone are the A&R men finding that individual with the perfect voice that they can sign and promote with the hope of getting the hits. Now we have a machine that can almost produce hits to order, almost being the key word… There are producers out there who have the ability to write songs that have what they describe as ‘hooks’, those little parts of a track that are so catchy, so addictive, that they stick in your head. These men, and it still is almost exclusively men, are still rare, but that ability to turn a song from one that would have only sold thousands to one that sells millions makes them worth a fortune.

Earworm: a catchy song or tune that runs continually through someone's mind.

Seabrook has written an interesting book, smearing away some of the gloss and glamour from the music industry, to reveal details of its inner workings. He describes just how these talented individuals pull together a song, finding those hook’s that make people want to listen more and the bridge moment when they divert from the original melody and rhythm and slot something else in. I have known that they manufactured music in the same way that they create groups, for ages, but I didn’t realise quite how strong the Swedish influence was in the global music industry. There were some interesting chapters on how Napster wreaked havoc with the business model of the music industry, how streaming has changed how they operate, how they use topliners and that the only way that a star can now make any money is to be continually touring because of the grip that the music industry has on them. It was an interesting book overall on a global industry that has as many secrets as glitterballs. ( )
  PDCRead | Apr 6, 2020 |
The Song Machine is a fairly well written history of the deterioration of the pop song, the record industry, and the decline of artistry in all of it. I realize that I detest the music to the extent that it probably clouded my appreciation of the book a bit, but it is difficult to take serious an entire range of songs largely cloned (sampled is the clever word they came up with to hide their thievery) from every song that came before it, singers whose voices are so computer-enhanced that they sound more like alien robots than vocalists, and a stable of "producers" all going by silly, made-up names who largely serve more as experts at some software program (including Pro Tools) than as song-people. In the meantime, record companies continue to bite the dust, front-men (the "singers") are so interchangeable that no one can really tell them apart or even much care, and The Song dies a little more every day. ( )
  SamSattler | Jan 19, 2018 |
A straightforward and fairly interesting look at what goes on behind the scenes of the modern pop song. This book held my interest and I breezed through it in two days, but after finishing I can't help but feel there was something missing. It was breezy and vaguely informative in that New Yorker profile sort of way (Seabrook is a staff writer there and a few chapters first appeared there), but like many of those types of pieces, when it comes time for the author to make some sort of conclusion or fashion a story arc, nothing really happens. Still, it's not a bad book at all, and I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it, as long as you know you're essentially getting a long New Yorker article. ( )
  redhopper | Dec 2, 2017 |
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There's a reason hit songs offer such guilty pleasure--they're designed that way. Over the last two decades a new type of hit song has emerged, one that is almost inescapably catchy. Pop songs have always had a "hook," but today's songs bristle with them: a hook every seven seconds is the rule. Painstakingly crafted to tweak the brain's delight in melody, rhythm, and repetition, these songs are highly processed products. Like snack-food engineers, modern songwriters have discovered the musical "bliss point." And just like junk food, the bliss point leaves you wanting more. In The Song Machine, longtime New Yorker staff writer John Seabrook tells the story of the massive cultural upheaval that produced these new, super-strength hits. Seabrook takes us into a strange and surprising world, full of unexpected and vivid characters, as he traces the growth of this new approach to hit-making from its obscure origins in early 1990s Sweden to its dominance of today's Billboard charts. Going beyond music to discuss money, business, marketing, and technology, The Song Machine explores what the new hits may be doing to our brains and listening habits, especially as services like Spotify and Apple Music use streaming data to gather music into new genres invented by algorithms based on listener behavior. Revelatory and original, this book will change the way you listen to music.--Adapted from book jacket.

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