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Unfinished Business: Women Men Work Family…
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Unfinished Business: Women Men Work Family (original: 2015; edição: 2016)

de Anne-Marie Slaughter (Autor)

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1795120,501 (3.69)6
"A powerful, persuasive, thought-provoking vision for how to finish the long struggle for equality between men and women, work and family When Anne-Marie Slaughter accepted her dream job as the first female director of policy planning at the U.S. State Department in 2009, she was confident she could juggle the demands of her position in Washington, D.C., with the responsibilities of her family life in suburban New Jersey. Her husband and two young sons encouraged her to pursue the job; she had a tremendously supportive boss, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton; and she had been moving up on a high-profile career track since law school. But then life intervened. Parenting needs caused her to make a decision to leave the State Department and return to an academic career that gave her more time for her family. The reactions to her choice to leave Washington because of her kids led her to question the feminist narrative she grew up with. Her subsequent article for The Atlantic, "Why Women Still Can't Have It All," created a firestorm, sparked intense national debate, and became one of the most-read pieces in the magazine's history. Since that time, Anne-Marie Slaughter has pushed forward, breaking free of her long-standing assumptions about work, life, and family. Though many solutions have been proposed for how women can continue to break the glass ceiling or rise above the "motherhood penalty," women at the top and the bottom of the income scale are further and further apart. Now, in her refreshing and forthright voice, Anne-Marie Slaughter returns with her vision for what true equality between men and women really means, and how we can get there. She uncovers the missing piece of the puzzle, presenting a new focus that can reunite the women's movement and provide a common banner under which both men and women can advance and thrive. With moving personal stories, individual action plans, and a broad outline for change, Anne-Marie Slaughter reveals a future in which all of us can finally finish the business of equality for women and men, work and family. Advance praise for Unfinished Business "Anne-Marie Slaughter insists that we ask ourselves hard questions. After reading Unfinished Business, I'm confident that you will be left with Anne-Marie's hope and optimism that we can change our points of view and policies so that both men and women can fully participate in their families and use their full talents on the job."--Hillary Rodham Clinton, former Secretary of State "Anne-Marie Slaughter's gift for illuminating large issues through everyday human stories is what makes this book so necessary for anyone who wants to be both a leader at work and a fully engaged parent at home."--Arianna Huffington "With breathtaking honesty Anne-Marie Slaughter tackles the challenges of often conflicted working mothers and working fathers and shows how we can craft the lives we want for our families. Her book will spark a national conversation about what we need to do to live saner, more satisfying lives."--Katie Couric "Unfinished Business is an important read for women and men alike. Slaughter shows us that when people share equally the responsibility of caring for others, they are healthier, economies prosper, and both women and men are freer to lead the lives they want."--Melinda Gates, co-chair, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation"-- "When Anne-Marie Slaughter's Atlantic article, "Why Women Still Can't Have it All" first appeared, it immediately went viral, sparking a firestorm of debate across the country. Within four days, it had become the most-read article in the history of the magazine. In the following months, Slaughter became a leading voice in the nationwide discussion on work-life balance and on women's changing role in the workplace. Now, Slaughter is here with her eagerly anticipated take on the problems we still face, and how we can finally get past them. In her pragmatic, down-to-earth style, Slaughter bursts the bubble on all the "half-truths" we tell young women about "having it all", and explains what is really necessary to get true gender equality, both in the workplace and at home. Deeply researched, and filled with all the warm, wise and funny anecdotes that first made her the most trusted and admired voice on the issue, Anne-Marie Slaughter's book is sure to change minds, ignite debate, and be the topic of conversation"--… (mais)
Membro:loralu
Título:Unfinished Business: Women Men Work Family
Autores:Anne-Marie Slaughter (Autor)
Informação:Random House Trade Paperbacks (2016), Edition: Reprint, 368 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Unfinished Business: Women Men Work Family de Anne-Marie Slaughter (2015)

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Exibindo 5 de 5
Loved this book for calling out real life problems and the probable solutions in the most candid manner. My initial thought was this is just another book on feminism , was pleasantly surprised to see that it was much more than that.
It is a book on what our notions on equality are and what it should really be. The author has managed to give a fresh perspective of feminism that includes men as opposed to doing it all on our own. A workplace that values work and family equally sounds utopian but doesn’t seem that impractical. Much to learn from this book and definitely worth a read by everybody who has ever had to ponder on the big question of work-life balance (or fit, as this book suggests)!
( )
  rrkreads | Jun 15, 2020 |
This book taught me that I'm not supposed to say "Stay at Home Dad" but instead say "Full time Parent". I also learned that I am both a role model and looked down on by other guys because my wife works full time while I watch the kids. It did recognize though that women are encouraged to be anything they want but that men are not encouraged to take up what is seen as traditionally women's roles (parenting, nursing, teaching). Mostly though this book is geared towards working women.

Most annoying thing I learned though is that the author wrote an article for The Atlantic. I know this because it is mentioned every other page. ( )
  nmorse | Dec 3, 2019 |
The idea at the core of this book is not the inequality of women and men in the workplace, but the unequal value American society places on competition (ambition, putting oneself first, breadwinning) and care (providing care for children, aging parents, other family members or friends). Both types of work are equally necessary, but work that generates income is more respected and has more prestige; care work - paid or unpaid - is significantly undervalued and under-appreciated, in no small part because it has traditionally been women's work.

In order to create a more equal, caring society - one that truly does value human capital (the children are our future!) - we must see both competition and care as equally valuable. Individual employers can help by creating more flexible policies for both men and women, and evaluating workers on their output, not simply the number of hours they spend at the office. The government can help by strengthening our (weak, compared to most other countries) social safety net with paid parental leave and high-quality daycare and preschool.

If only we could put all these ideas into effect - change people's thinking and update our public policy - immediately (Or ideally, several decades ago). Change is happening, but too slowly.

Quotes

...employers are assuming that it is impossible to be both a committed caregiver and a good worker. But why should that be? The least we can do is force employers to justify that assumption. (91)

If we truly valued caregiving - thought that it was not only necessary but important and valuable and hard - we would make every effort to accommodate and support it and judge workers based not on our assumptions but on their results. (92)

Most of the pervasive gender inequalities in our society - for both men and women - cannot be fixed unless men have the same range of choices with respect to mixing caregiving and breadwinning that women do. (127)

Real equality for men and women needs a men's movement to sweep away the gender roles that we continue to impose on men even as we struggle to remove them from women. (128)

Every generation assumes that the way it does things is the way things are. (166)

Mama Unabridged blog: http://mamaunabridged.com/about/ (168)

...talk can change the way we think, which can then change the way we act...we can...[make] our language reflect the change we'd like to see. (186) [e.g. "full-time parent" instead of "stay-at-home mom/dad"]

We can take our founding credo - "All men are created equal" - and understand it to mean that men and women are equal and that the work that was once divided between men and women - earning income and providing care - is equally necessary and equally valuable. (246) ( )
  JennyArch | Nov 12, 2015 |
How we organize our lives so that family and work can both thrive.
Amazon:A powerful, persuasive, thought-provoking vision for how to finish the long struggle for equality between men and women, work and family

When Anne-Marie Slaughter accepted her dream job as the first female director of policy planning at the U.S. State Department in 2009, she was confident she could juggle the demands of her position in Washington, D.C., with the responsibilities of her family life in suburban New Jersey. Her husband and two young sons encouraged her to pursue the job; she had a tremendously supportive boss, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton; and she had been moving up on a high-profile career track since law school. But then life intervened. Parenting needs caused her to make a decision to leave the State Department and return to an academic career that gave her more time for her family.

The reactions to her choice to leave Washington because of her kids led her to question the feminist narrative she grew up with. Her subsequent article for The Atlantic, “Why Women Still Can’t Have It All,” created a firestorm, sparked intense national debate, and became one of the most-read pieces in the magazine’s history.

Since that time, Anne-Marie Slaughter has pushed forward, breaking free of her long-standing assumptions about work, life, and family. Though many solutions have been proposed for how women can continue to break the glass ceiling or rise above the “motherhood penalty,” women at the top and the bottom of the income scale are further and further apart. ( )
  clifforddham | Oct 9, 2015 |
Slaughter's Atlantic essay went viral when she wrote about why she was leaving a federal appointment to return to academia and her family. Now head of a non-profit organization, she reflects on life since the article and why focusing more employers' attention on care can help create more loyal and productive employees. Additionally, she reflects on how to improve perceptions of non-traditional male roles. An important, nuanced read about an important issue, with particular focus on college-educated strands of employment. Highly recommended. Review copy received from the publisher via NetGalley.com. (137) ( )
  activelearning | Jul 5, 2015 |
Exibindo 5 de 5
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"A powerful, persuasive, thought-provoking vision for how to finish the long struggle for equality between men and women, work and family When Anne-Marie Slaughter accepted her dream job as the first female director of policy planning at the U.S. State Department in 2009, she was confident she could juggle the demands of her position in Washington, D.C., with the responsibilities of her family life in suburban New Jersey. Her husband and two young sons encouraged her to pursue the job; she had a tremendously supportive boss, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton; and she had been moving up on a high-profile career track since law school. But then life intervened. Parenting needs caused her to make a decision to leave the State Department and return to an academic career that gave her more time for her family. The reactions to her choice to leave Washington because of her kids led her to question the feminist narrative she grew up with. Her subsequent article for The Atlantic, "Why Women Still Can't Have It All," created a firestorm, sparked intense national debate, and became one of the most-read pieces in the magazine's history. Since that time, Anne-Marie Slaughter has pushed forward, breaking free of her long-standing assumptions about work, life, and family. Though many solutions have been proposed for how women can continue to break the glass ceiling or rise above the "motherhood penalty," women at the top and the bottom of the income scale are further and further apart. Now, in her refreshing and forthright voice, Anne-Marie Slaughter returns with her vision for what true equality between men and women really means, and how we can get there. She uncovers the missing piece of the puzzle, presenting a new focus that can reunite the women's movement and provide a common banner under which both men and women can advance and thrive. With moving personal stories, individual action plans, and a broad outline for change, Anne-Marie Slaughter reveals a future in which all of us can finally finish the business of equality for women and men, work and family. Advance praise for Unfinished Business "Anne-Marie Slaughter insists that we ask ourselves hard questions. After reading Unfinished Business, I'm confident that you will be left with Anne-Marie's hope and optimism that we can change our points of view and policies so that both men and women can fully participate in their families and use their full talents on the job."--Hillary Rodham Clinton, former Secretary of State "Anne-Marie Slaughter's gift for illuminating large issues through everyday human stories is what makes this book so necessary for anyone who wants to be both a leader at work and a fully engaged parent at home."--Arianna Huffington "With breathtaking honesty Anne-Marie Slaughter tackles the challenges of often conflicted working mothers and working fathers and shows how we can craft the lives we want for our families. Her book will spark a national conversation about what we need to do to live saner, more satisfying lives."--Katie Couric "Unfinished Business is an important read for women and men alike. Slaughter shows us that when people share equally the responsibility of caring for others, they are healthier, economies prosper, and both women and men are freer to lead the lives they want."--Melinda Gates, co-chair, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation"-- "When Anne-Marie Slaughter's Atlantic article, "Why Women Still Can't Have it All" first appeared, it immediately went viral, sparking a firestorm of debate across the country. Within four days, it had become the most-read article in the history of the magazine. In the following months, Slaughter became a leading voice in the nationwide discussion on work-life balance and on women's changing role in the workplace. Now, Slaughter is here with her eagerly anticipated take on the problems we still face, and how we can finally get past them. In her pragmatic, down-to-earth style, Slaughter bursts the bubble on all the "half-truths" we tell young women about "having it all", and explains what is really necessary to get true gender equality, both in the workplace and at home. Deeply researched, and filled with all the warm, wise and funny anecdotes that first made her the most trusted and admired voice on the issue, Anne-Marie Slaughter's book is sure to change minds, ignite debate, and be the topic of conversation"--

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