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Puolalainen unikirja de Tadeusz Konwicki
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Puolalainen unikirja (original: 1963; edição: 1966)

de Tadeusz Konwicki, Taisto Veikko Tolvanen

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1341154,844 (4.23)7
"We live, as we dream--alone," Conrad revealed in "Heart of Darkness." This novel by Tadeusz Konwicki, a Pole writing in his own language, is an extension of the theme of dream and life and their interlocking realities, and man's attempt to come to meaningful and personal terms with an existential and absurd universe.The antihero (in the Camusian sense) is shown at the opening of the novel just coming out of a coma, having tried to commit suicide by poison. He is surrounded by provincial townsfolk, villagers who in their isolation and emotional impoverishment have turned their energies to creating a new religion--a private God, non-identifiable as either Christian or non-Christian.Called "one of the most terrifying novels in postwar Polish literature, ...greeted upon its appearance (in 1963) as a major literary sensation" (Czeslaw Milosz, "History of Polish Literature), " the novel moves through a series of flashbacks between present reality and recalled experiences. The language is that of a dream sequence with metaphors of nightmarish quality, both in intensity and "illogicality."The young Pole who narrates his experiences reveals himself to be caught up in a labyrinth leading nowhere, driven by an urge which ultimately is a need for punishment, and represents man's longing for a responsive and benevolent force over his destiny. Acutely feeling the lack, faced with a godless universe, he sees his choice to be between selfassertive survival at any price--moral, sensual, intellectual--or the selfpronouncement of worthlessness and the denouement of peace attained by suicide. The hero "escapes" death and is condemned to death-in-life.Konwicki's descriptions of the brutal mutual massacres of some of the war experiences of the narrator are unforgettable in their irony. The dialogue is witty and ironic, and retains the vernacular thrust of the Polish original. The author's experience as director and script writer earned him a Grand Prix (1958) at Venice for a film entitled "The Last Day of Summer." His vivid awareness of the passing values in an increasingly superficial world of interrelationships and goals makes this passionate work a powerful indictment of modern man's progress in guilt and war and his impotence in melding his idealistic dreams and his life.… (mais)
Membro:Eeva-Liisa_Manner
Título:Puolalainen unikirja
Autores:Tadeusz Konwicki
Outros autores:Taisto Veikko Tolvanen
Informação:Helsinki WSOY 1966
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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A Dreambook for Our Time de Tadeusz Konwicki (1963)

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Poland (49)
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A Dreambook for Our Time is a vividly told, character-driven narrative about the lives of a group of Polish adults in the late 1950s, about the time of Sputnik. The action takes place in a Polish village somewhere on the Sola River. A huge presence in the novel is that of the nearby forest. It was in the forest that many people hid from the Nazis during the war. It was also in the forest that Polish partisans operated during wartime; that Hitler was said to have hidden the "gold of the Jews"; and that one Huniady, a partisan turned bandit, was said to have his hideaway. In the present day action of the story, the local residents are bracing themselves for the eventual inundation of the valley for a new dam is now under construction. We first come across our narrator as he lies recovering from a suicide attempt in the parlor of his landlady, Miss Malvina. The main characters of the novel are pretty much all introduced in this scene. There is the Partisan, a local warlord who has lost power now that national and local government have been reestablished; Miss Malvina, a religious nut, but one who likes her drop and has an overweening sense of the social proprieties; her brother Ildefons Korsak, an old soldier half out of his mind after serving in a numerous wars who may conceivably be suffering from syphilis-related dementia; Joseph Car, the local evangelist preacher; Regina, a shopkeeper at the state-owned store who rejects the lusty Partisan's incessant offers of love; Justine, Car's wife who carries on an affair with our narrator; and others more peripheral. The story is for the most part about the daily grind of the main characters, who do not by any means strive to live the "examined" life. They drink ungodly amounts of vodka on the slightest pretext and in their cups act out in the most absurd ways. For the Partisan the central issues are his loss of face (power) and Regina's refusal of him. For the narrator, it is his failure during the war as a NCO of the Polish Home Army. There are a number of flashbacks to wartime during which we get the backstory on our narrator. Dreams intrude on daily life, but they are never indistinguishable from reality. One of my concerns on starting the novel was that it would lack coherence, that I would be at sea amid a bunch of unconnected and ambiguous images à la symbolist poetry. It is a "dreambook" after all. But that was not the case. Highly recommended for the deep reader. (Don't take it to the beach.)
2 vote Brasidas | Apr 20, 2011 |
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"We live, as we dream--alone," Conrad revealed in "Heart of Darkness." This novel by Tadeusz Konwicki, a Pole writing in his own language, is an extension of the theme of dream and life and their interlocking realities, and man's attempt to come to meaningful and personal terms with an existential and absurd universe.The antihero (in the Camusian sense) is shown at the opening of the novel just coming out of a coma, having tried to commit suicide by poison. He is surrounded by provincial townsfolk, villagers who in their isolation and emotional impoverishment have turned their energies to creating a new religion--a private God, non-identifiable as either Christian or non-Christian.Called "one of the most terrifying novels in postwar Polish literature, ...greeted upon its appearance (in 1963) as a major literary sensation" (Czeslaw Milosz, "History of Polish Literature), " the novel moves through a series of flashbacks between present reality and recalled experiences. The language is that of a dream sequence with metaphors of nightmarish quality, both in intensity and "illogicality."The young Pole who narrates his experiences reveals himself to be caught up in a labyrinth leading nowhere, driven by an urge which ultimately is a need for punishment, and represents man's longing for a responsive and benevolent force over his destiny. Acutely feeling the lack, faced with a godless universe, he sees his choice to be between selfassertive survival at any price--moral, sensual, intellectual--or the selfpronouncement of worthlessness and the denouement of peace attained by suicide. The hero "escapes" death and is condemned to death-in-life.Konwicki's descriptions of the brutal mutual massacres of some of the war experiences of the narrator are unforgettable in their irony. The dialogue is witty and ironic, and retains the vernacular thrust of the Polish original. The author's experience as director and script writer earned him a Grand Prix (1958) at Venice for a film entitled "The Last Day of Summer." His vivid awareness of the passing values in an increasingly superficial world of interrelationships and goals makes this passionate work a powerful indictment of modern man's progress in guilt and war and his impotence in melding his idealistic dreams and his life.

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