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Martin Marten: A Novel de Brian Doyle
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Martin Marten: A Novel (edição: 2015)

de Brian Doyle (Autor)

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11012198,056 (4.41)2
"Dave is fourteen years old, living with his family in a cabin on Oregon's Mount Hood (or as Dave prefers to call it, like the Native Americans once did, Wy'east). He is entering high school, adulthood on the horizon not far off in distance, and contemplating a future away from his mother, father, and his precocious younger sister. And Dave is not the only one approaching adulthood and its freedoms on Wy'east that summer. Martin, a pine marten (a small animal of the deep woods, of the otter/mink family), is leaving his own mother and siblings and setting off on his own as well. As Martin and Dave's paths cross on forest trails and rocky mountaintops, they and we witness the full, unknowable breadth and vast sweep of life, and the awe inspiring interconnectedness of the world and its many inhabitants, human and otherwise. Martin Marten is a coming of age tale like no other, told in Brian Doyle's joyous, rollicking style"--… (mais)
Membro:StellaPernod
Título:Martin Marten: A Novel
Autores:Brian Doyle (Autor)
Informação:Thomas Dunne Books (2015), Edition: 1st, 320 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:*****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Martin Marten: A Novel de Brian Doyle

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This is a coming-of-age story about two males: one is a 14-year old human (Dave) and the other is a young marten (Martin.) Dave lives with his hardworking parents and little sister in a cabin on Mount Hood (or as Brian Doyle prefers to call it, Wy'east, its Native American name.) The parallels and contrasts between their two lives, their struggles and successes, their periodic sightings of each other, made this a “feel good” story. Doyle’s philosophy of caring for each other and the land and plants, animals, insects, etc. will appeal to nature lovers. I especially liked Dave’s spunky little sister and Martin’s live-saving heroics. After awhile, I got bored. ( )
  skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
Martin Marten is ostensibly about the first two years of the life of a marten named Martin who lives in the forest on the slopes of Mt. Hood in Oregon (Doyle uses the Native American name for the mountain, Wy'east). Martin is actually just one of a myriad of characters whose lives are described in this book: we also follow Dave, a teenage boy, his parents, his precocious sister Maria, the giant elk Louis, a trapper named Mr. Douglas and his charming horse Edwin, the local store owner Miss Moss, a stray dog who decides to move in with a substitute teacher, a fox, a guy who likes riding his bike really fast all the time, and several other characters. But what the book is really about is the beautiful abundance and interconnectedness of nature, and how the world is jam-packed with stories if we just stop to pay attention.

There's not really any plot. Good things happen and bad things happen, but ultimately everyone is kind and loving and nature is generous. Doyle writes with humor and empathy and a deep, deep appreciation of the variety and bounty of creation. I love Doyle's writing: he's full of kaleidoscopic lists.

This book is good for the soul. It's soothing and full of happiness and love. ( )
  Gwendydd | Jan 14, 2020 |
Brian Doyle tells a great story, funny and comforting but with enough grit to keep it from being sticky. ( )
  MaryHeleneMele | May 6, 2019 |
Brian Doyle evokes the life of a marten just as deftly and convincingly as he does that of his teenaged protagonist, skirting the boundaries of anthropomorphism so perfectly that you’ll believe you know how a marten might feel. Maybe you (an adult reader) might learn how a teenager feels too, though the book is really written for teens—perhaps they’re trying, like Dave, to understand adulthood.

Martin Marten is a coming of age story, but so much more. The ages of the forest weave into the age of a boy; the timescapes and landscapes of man weave into those of the wild. Facts and figures and fun and fear and happiness all blend, and it’s not fantasy, but a kind of super-reality, that invites the reader to know how the world’s senses flow.

The author humanizes animals and humans in this novel, fitting us all together and giving us a place that’s convincingly called home—a place in a small community, with animals and nature close by, and friends and strangers sharing and twining their lives. It’s a wonderful book.

Disclosure: I read Mink River and I was eager to read more of Brian Doyle. I love his writing. ( )
1 vote SheilaDeeth | Feb 18, 2019 |
There is a great deal to recommend this book. In fact, I feel this particular author has it within to eventually come up with a Great American Novel. His best is really that good. However, there is a bit of roughness around the edges with this one -- in my opinion -- that suggests his publisher may have pushed him to get something ready for print before he was ready to do so. So, what do we have here. The title of the book suggests this is about a woodland animal, and, indeed, there is much about the book, especially in the beginning, that reminds me pleasantly of the direct non-human perspective of Garth Stein's The Art of Racing on the Rain. But even then, the book immediately shares its billing with a young boy in a small, rustic Oregon town, who has his own life to live beyond that of a marten named Martin. His life touches in a very entertaining way with his family, including a very exceptional younger sister. The family, in turn, weaves in and out with many varied members of this little community, a community both diverse and richly appealing. For those acquainted with the TV show, Northern Exposures, and the Port William community of Wendell Berry, this is not quite as quirky (or sometimes ill-intended) as the Cicely, Alaska crowd could get, but is often much more humorous than the kind folks of Port William. In any event, this is not a children's book. In the end, it is a celebration of people interacting with each other and with the wilderness around them in a most touching and fun way. ( )
  larryerick | Apr 26, 2018 |
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Beauty and grace are performed whether or not we will or sense them. Thes least we can do is try to be there. -Annie Dillard (from Pilgrim at Tinker Creek?)
We will never, we cannot, leave [animals] alone, even the tiniest one, ever, because we know we are one with them. Their blood is our blood. Their breath is our breath, their beginning our beginning, their fate our fate. Thus we deny them. Thus we yearn for them. They are among us and within us and of us, inextricably woven with the form and manner of our being, with our understanding and our imaginations. They are the grit and the salt and the lullaby of our language. - Pattiann Rogers, "Animals and People"
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It's wrong to say that animals do not feel what we feel; indeed, they may feel far more than we do and in far different emotional shades. Given that their senses are often a hundred times more perceptive than ours, could not their emotional equipment be similarly vast? (p. 55)
The fact is that there are more stories the the space of a single second, in a single square foot of dirt and air and water, than we could tell each other in a hundred years. The word amazing isn't much of a world for how amazing that is. The fact is that there are more stories in the world than there are fish in the sea or birds in the air or lies among politicians. You could be sad at how many stories go untold, but you could also be delighted at how many stories we catch and share in delight and wonder and astonishment and illumination and sometimes even epiphany. The fact is that the more stories we share about living beings, the more attentive we are to living beings, and perhaps the less willing we are to slaughter them and allow them to be slaughtered. That could be. (p. 57)
He [Martin the marten] did not "think" about evidence and implications as we do; he absorbed the evidence and drew conclusions and implications in another way that we do not yet understand and perhaps never will. We would be very foolish and arrogant to conclude that our way of thinking is necessarily better or deeper than his, especially as we don't actually understand his way; wouldn't that be like saying your language is better than another, though you do not speak the other? Does that make sense? No? Yet that is what our species has done for many long years. Perhaps the less we think we know, the wiser we are and the closer to actual understanding we get. Perhaps the more we learn, abashed and humble, about the ways other beings think, the closer we get to other ways of living. (p. 69)
Also in the meadow of course were many other guests either resident therein or visitors passing through on business, and Dave and Moon made a list of all the other beings who attended Maria's birthday party and presented her with the gift of themselves, as Moon said: crickets, grasshoppers, beetles, ants worms, wasps, bees, damselflies, dragonflies, moths, butterflies, swallows, jays, crows, warblers, a tiny woodpecker, squirrels, chipmunks, and what sure seemed like a peregrine falcon, although it went by far too fast to get a good look. Also Moon was sure he saw a deer's long sad face in the shadows under the trees, and Dave pointed out that if you considered the meadow to be an endless vertical space as well as a finite horizontal space, you could include geese, cranes, ravens, and what probably was an eagle, although ti was too high to see clearly. (p. 72-3)
Some are readily seen, like ... coyotes, who are all flourishing, tribally, what with the vast and savory dining opportunities that people provide ... unconsciously (providing cats for coyote appetizers ... (p. 75)
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"Dave is fourteen years old, living with his family in a cabin on Oregon's Mount Hood (or as Dave prefers to call it, like the Native Americans once did, Wy'east). He is entering high school, adulthood on the horizon not far off in distance, and contemplating a future away from his mother, father, and his precocious younger sister. And Dave is not the only one approaching adulthood and its freedoms on Wy'east that summer. Martin, a pine marten (a small animal of the deep woods, of the otter/mink family), is leaving his own mother and siblings and setting off on his own as well. As Martin and Dave's paths cross on forest trails and rocky mountaintops, they and we witness the full, unknowable breadth and vast sweep of life, and the awe inspiring interconnectedness of the world and its many inhabitants, human and otherwise. Martin Marten is a coming of age tale like no other, told in Brian Doyle's joyous, rollicking style"--

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813.6 — Literature English (North America) American fiction 21st Century

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