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Moby Dick (1851)

de Herman Melville

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
35,11053871 (3.81)8 / 1613
Classic Literature. Fiction. HTML:

The itinerant sailor Ishmael begins a voyage on the whaling ship Pequod whose captain, Ahab, wishes to exact revenge upon the whale Moby-Dick, who destroyed his last ship and took his leg. As they search for the savage white whale, Ishmael questions all aspects of life. The story is woven in complex, lyrical language and uses many theatrical forms, such as stage direction and soliloquy. It is considered the exemplar of American Romanticism, and one of the greatest American novels of all time.

.… (mais)
  1. 190
    The Sea Wolf de Jack London (wvlibrarydude)
  2. 170
    In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex de Nathaniel Philbrick (jseger9000)
    jseger9000: In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex tells the true story that inspired Melville to write Moby Dick.
  3. 100
    Lord Jim de Joseph Conrad (_eskarina)
  4. 80
    Two Years Before the Mast de Richard Henry Jr. Dana (knownever)
    knownever: A more enjoyable, shorter, and less allegorical story of sailing life, although there aren't any whales. The author of this one kind of looks down on whalers. All together a more jaunty sea tale.
  5. 80
    The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket de Edgar Allan Poe (caflores)
  6. 50
    The Whale: In Search of the Giants of the Sea de Philip Hoare (chrisharpe, John_Vaughan)
  7. 61
    O Velho e O Mar de Ernest Hemingway (caflores)
  8. 62
    The Confidence-Man: His Masquerade de Herman Melville (GaryPatella)
    GaryPatella: Compared to Moby Dick, The Confidence Man is a much lighter read. But after ploughing through Moby Dick, this may be a welcome change. It is not as profound, but you also don't have to struggle through any of it. This is worth reading.
  9. 40
    The Wreck of the Whaleship Essex de Owen Chase (meggyweg)
  10. 30
    Billy Budd, Bartleby, and Other Stories de Herman Melville (chwiggy)
  11. 41
    Why Read Moby-Dick? de Nathaniel Philbrick (John_Vaughan)
  12. 53
    The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays de Albert Camus (WilfGehlen)
    WilfGehlen: Camus was greatly influenced by Melville and in The Myth of Sisyphus mentions Moby-Dick as a truly absurd work. Reading Moby-Dick with Camus' absurd in mind gives a deeper, and very different insight than provided by the usual emphasis on Ahab's quest for revenge.… (mais)
  13. 53
    Ahab's Wife or, The Star-Gazer de Sena Jeter Naslund (ecleirs24, AriadneAranea)
    ecleirs24: Cause this novel is based upon a passage from Mobi Dick......
  14. 31
    Railsea de China Miéville (Longshanks)
    Longshanks: An imaginative, affectionate pastiche of the novel's themes, imagery, and characters.
  15. 64
    Master and Commander de Patrick O'Brian (caflores)
    caflores: Para amantes del lenguaje náutico y de las descripciones detalladas.
  16. 31
    Genoa: A Telling of Wonders de Paul Metcalf (tootstorm)
    tootstorm: Melville's heir struggles to close his relationship to his preceding literary genius. Click the link above, read what you can, and get yourself hooked on one of the most critically-adored yet criminally-underread novels written in a century defined by self-analysis and experimentation.… (mais)
  17. 10
    Qohelet de Piero Capelli (Oct326)
    Oct326: "Qohelet" e "Moby Dick" sono due grandi libri, molto diversi ma con un tema in comune: l'inconsistenza, l'insignificanza e l'inutilità dell'agire umano al cospetto della natura e dell'universo.
  18. 11
    The Last Fish Tale de Mark Kurlansky (John_Vaughan)
  19. 11
    The Nautical Chart de Arturo Pérez-Reverte (Ronoc)
  20. 33
    Absalom, Absalom! de William Faulkner (ateolf)

(ver todas 26 recomendações)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 529 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
So.

Wow.

This is just a fantastic novel. And it fails so badly.

As I made my way through this, I began to get the drift of the novel when it took 23 chapters for Ishmael and Queequeg to even get out to sea. Then it was four chapters of info dump. I don't even think there was a mention of a white whale until the 32 chapter? And then, more info dumps.

I tried to get a handle on this novel and this is the best I can come up with...imagine the voice of Rod Serling as he says,

Imagine, if you will, a timeless place, where the strange and impossible can happen.

A place where Frank Herbert, still heady with the excitement of having finished his novel DUNE, looks to write a similar, yet opposite novel, a bigger, better version of both THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA and JAWS. He finds himself swapping sand for saltwater, sandworms for whales, Stilgar for Queequeg, and Baron Harkonnen for Captain Ahab.

When he finishes it, he hands it off to HOUSE OF LEAVES author Mark Z. Danielewski to add some completely unnecessary interjections that have nothing to do with the plot, as he knows Mark is very good at this.

Mark, then wishing to add some verisimilitude to the burgeoning novel, then hands it off to a writer for the Enclyclopidia Brittanica to add facts on whales, the whaling industry, the significance of "white", facts about rope, more facts about whales, and any other minutiae that may have been mentioned in the dwindling story.

Finally, once that's completed and the novel is now about 40% story, 40% facts, and 20% author's opinions, then Cormac McCarthy is brought in (under strict instructions to leave the damn apostrophes and quotation marks alone) to wordsmith the hell out of the entire thing with the aim of making it prettier, but far more dense.

They'll all agree to slap the name "Herman Melville" on as the author, dust their hands off, and congratulate each other on a job well done.

No one will ever accuse Stephen King of writing too much ever again.

Reader, you've just entered the White Whale Zone.


Okay, so maybe that's a little bit of a crazy scenario, but it's as close as I can come.

At its heart, the main storyline is a good one, and it's actually very gorgeously written. There's a part of me that wants to read the basic, 200-ish page story of Ahab stalking his white whale, without all the side stories, opinion pieces, and informative asides.

Still, the writing... Even the completely unnecessary side trips to get far too much information on some of the crew, eating whale steak, and the difference in crow's nests do come across as interesting, again because the writing is good.

But the points where Melville kills all wind and lets the sails hang limply, his plot dead in the water as he hammers the reader mercilessly with the cetology of various species of whale, etc...they were, while informative in the extreme, were as interesting for the most part as being offered a hearty mug of sea water to drink.

Overall, the combined effect of all of these various passages do serve to make the reader feel each day of the Pequod's long three-year journey, so the novel does sell the journey.

And Ahab? I have to say he's as unlikable a character as I've ever met in fiction.

Overall, while I'd never dive into this novel again, I must say, I'm glad I experienced it. I'm glad I got to revel in Melville's gorgeous prose, and I'm glad I met Ishmael and Queequeg and Starbuck and, yes, even Moby Dick himself. I am richer for having read this novel.

And for that reason, while it's deeply flawed, I have to give this book four solid stars. ( )
1 vote TobinElliott | Feb 7, 2024 |
We had some giggles over this one. There's great humor in the first several chapters. It's a bit of a drone with the listing of whale types and such. ( )
  cmpeters | Feb 2, 2024 |
I have listened to this book as an audiobook over and over again, and I can say that I am much prefer everything that happens to the narrator before he gets on the ship. The long chapters on whaling are really boring and offputting and most people just skip that. This book would’ve been a lot more successful with more drama less how to whale. For one thing it’s much too large to be carried around and I’m sure this was a problem back before digital books when it would cost more to publish so many Unwanted pages. ( )
  laurelzito | Jan 28, 2024 |
One of the greatest meditations on the meaning of life and a tale of the sea unparalleled. ( )
  MylesKesten | Jan 23, 2024 |
MOBY DICK IS THE SPARK OF DIVINE GNOSIS: blubber as those densified sheaths of matter that surround the warm interior, husks of the unseen being. If such an epic sprawling novel is said to contain within it a biblically allegorical mythos; it would only be of the true esoteric route to note that every biblical allegory has its selfsame gnostic roots, hermeneutically bubbling up from such aquatic and critical depths. The descents into cetological minutiae is that same descent of the soul into matter — as Ishmael wrestles with the duality of “docile, verdant peace of the land” and the “crazy cannibalistic chaos of the sea”; he draws his analytical rationality towards that ocean he can only know from a ship; so too Science draws its Pequodic boundary to stave off the abyssal waters of Nun, mystic night of the soul. The artifacts of the mundane realm, which Melville turns into an art of Digression (loci of contemplation), are only existent in contrast with the mysticism of the transcendent ocean, which is one with the Sky - as the archaic consciousness of Queequeg’s when he reveals his cosmology: "the stars are isles, but that far beyond all visible horizons, their own mild, uncontinented seas, interflow with the blue heavens". Though critical readings of the ‘homoerotic’ are not correct, on the surface, since the homoerotic is revealed not as within sexuality, but outside of it, when Ishmael is purifying that divine Semen of the Whale that represents gnosis: he goes into an ecstatic trance; a frenzy in which all of mankind, not homoerotic but Homo-Eros, becomes unified — “let us squeeze ourselves universally into the very milk and sperm of kindness”. As for Ahab; testament to the old figure and a figure of the Old Testament, has been ‘dismembered’ — much like Osiris, where the loss of his ‘members’ is the forgetting of the Self, only to be ‘remembered’ in anamnesis of the soul. Mystical is his every word that isn't bound to the locale of the ship: Ishmael says “the body is the lees of my better being”, “my shadow here on earth is my true substance”, Ahab says “the ancestry and posterity of Grief go further than the ancestry and posterity of Joy”, he gnostically laments the scandal of autogenesis: the ontological loneliness of God who so longs to know himself in the void of himself.

Thou knowest not how came ye, hence callest thyself unbegotten; certainly knowest not thy beginning, hence callest thyself unbegun. I know that of me, which thou knowest not of thyself, oh, thou omnipotent. There is some unsuffusing thing beyond thee, thou clear spirit, to whom all thy eternity is but time, all thy creativeness mechanical. Through thee, thy flaming self, my scorched eyes do dimly see it. Oh, thou foundling fire, thou hermit immemorial, thou too hast thy incommunicable riddle, thy unparticipated grief.

The ineffaceable, sad birth-mark in the brow of man, is but the stamp of sorrow in the signers.
( )
  avoidbeing | Jan 17, 2024 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 529 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Wise, funny and gripping, Melville's epic work continues to cast a long shadow over American literature.
adicionado por vibesandall | editarThe Guardian (UK), Robert McCrum (Jan 13, 2014)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (248 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Melville, Hermanautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Adler, Mortimer J.Editorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Beaver, Harold LowtherEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Boehmer, PaulNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Buhlert, KlausDiretorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
D'Agostino, NemiTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Delbanco, AndrewIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Epstein, JonathanNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Fadiman, CliftonIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Güttinger, FritzTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gibson, William M.Introduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Herd, DavidIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Hewgill, JodyArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Hirsch, IreneTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Jendis, MatthiasTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Judge, PhoebeNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Kazin, AlfredIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Kent, RockwellIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Meynell, ViolaEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Millionaire, TonyIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Moser, BarryIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Muller, FrankNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Mummendey, RichardTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Palmer, GarrickIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Pavese, CesareTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Pechmann, AlexanderTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Philbrick, NathanielIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Quirk, TomEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Quirk, TomCommentaryautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Rathjen, FriedhelmTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Robinson, BoardmanIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Schaeffer, MeadIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Schmischke, KurtIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Seiffert, AliceÜbersetzerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Seiffert, HansÜbersetzerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Souza, Alexandre Barbosa deTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Sutcliffe, DenhamPosfácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Trent, ThomasTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Walcutt, Charles ChildEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

Pertence à série publicada

Amstelboeken (60-61)
Great Books of the Western World (Volume 48, 1952 ed.)
I.Waldman & Son, Inc. (Moby Books 4520)
Moby Books (4520)
Playmore, Inc. Publishers (Moby Books 4520)

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Call me Ishmael. Some years ago — never mind how long precisely — having little or no money in my purse, and nothing particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little and see the watery part of the world.
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I’ll try a pagan friend, thought I, since Christian kindness has proved but hollow courtesy.
...so at nightfall, the Nantucketer, out of sight of land, furls his sails, and lays him to his rest, while under his very pillow rush herds of walruses and whales.
...Heaven have mercy on us all—Presbyterians and Pagans alike—for we are all somehow dreadfully cracked about the head, and sadly need mending.
‘Whale-balls for breakfast—don’t forget.’ (Stubb, second mate)
And with what quill did the Secretary of the Society for the Suppression of Cruelty to Ganders formally indite his circulars? It is only within the last month or two that that society passed a resolution to patronize nothing but steel pens.
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Please do not combine adaptations or abridged editions of Moby Dick with unabridged versions. Versions aimed at children are normally abridged editions and should not be combined here. Also, books ABOUT Moby Dick (such as study guides) should not be combined with the unabridged nor the abridged novel. Please keep such books as an independent work.
The ISBN 9025463312 is shared with a different work.
The Penguin Classics 150th Anniversary Ed (ISBN 0142000086) is not abridged, although that word has appeared in some user's data.
Norton Critical editions, Longman Critical editions and other scholarly editions should not be combined with the unabridged novel. The scholarly-type editions contain much additional material so they should be considered as separate works.
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Classic Literature. Fiction. HTML:

The itinerant sailor Ishmael begins a voyage on the whaling ship Pequod whose captain, Ahab, wishes to exact revenge upon the whale Moby-Dick, who destroyed his last ship and took his leg. As they search for the savage white whale, Ishmael questions all aspects of life. The story is woven in complex, lyrical language and uses many theatrical forms, such as stage direction and soliloquy. It is considered the exemplar of American Romanticism, and one of the greatest American novels of all time.

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