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Let Me Die in His Footsteps: A Novel de Lori…
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Let Me Die in His Footsteps: A Novel (edição: 2016)

de Lori Roy (Autor)

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17211125,042 (3.63)6
"In the spellbinding and suspenseful Let Me Die in His Footsteps, Edgar Award-winner Lori Roy wrests from a Southern town the secrets of two families touched by an evil that has passed between generations. On a dark Kentucky night in 1952 exactly halfway between her fifteenth and sixteenth birthdays, Annie Holleran crosses into forbidden territory. Everyone knows Hollerans don't go near Baines, not since Joseph Carl was buried two decades before, but, armed with a silver-handled flashlight, Annie runs through her family's lavender fields toward the well on the Baines' place. At the stroke of midnight, she gazes into the water in search of her future. Not finding what she had hoped for, she turns from the well and when the body she sees there in the moonlight is discovered come morning, Annie will have much to explain and a past to account for. It was 1936, and there were seven Baine boys. That year, Annie's aunt, Juna Crowley, with her black eyes and her long blond hair, came of age. Before Juna, Joseph Carl had been the best of all the Baine brothers. But then he looked into Juna's eyes and they made him do things that cost innocent people their lives. Sheriff Irlene Fulkerson saw justice served-or did she? As the lavender harvest approaches and she comes of age as Aunt Juna did in her own time, Annie's dread mounts. Juna will come home now, to finish what she started. If Annie is to save herself, her family, and this small Kentucky town, she must prepare for Juna's return, and the revelation of what really happened all those years ago"--… (mais)
Membro:PaperDollLady
Título:Let Me Die in His Footsteps: A Novel
Autores:Lori Roy (Autor)
Informação:Dutton (2016), Edition: Reprint, 352 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Coming of Age, Murder Mystery

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Let Me Die in His Footsteps de Lori Roy

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This book is told through the eyes of two people in two different time periods in tobacco country in Kentucky. The first is 1952 and it concerns Annie who is facing her ascension, which is what happens when a girl hits the age of fifteen and a half and becomes a woman. At midnight girls go to the Fulkerson well to look into it and see the face of the man they will marry and soon after they are supposed to receive their first kiss. Later that day there is a party to celebrate the occasion of their ascension. Annie has been told that Sarah is her mother, but she has figured out a long time ago that she is her Aunt Juna's child. Aunt Juna caused Joseph Carl to be hung in the last public hanging in 1936. Also that Joseph Carl is her father. There is only one Baines left, Mrs. Baines, the boys left and are believed to be dead. Something else laid at Juna's feet. When Annie decides to go to a well she chooses the one on the Baines property, since she has an antagonistic relationship with Ryce Fulkerson, the young man who seems to chase after her, but whose face was seen in the well by another girl and who said he guessed he'd marry her, even though it's been a year and he has yet to kiss the girl.

As Annie heads out, she expects that her father John Holleran will be following her to make sure she's alright, but it turns out he drank too much whiskey with the neighbor Abraham Pace and doesn't wake up to do this. Caroline her beautiful, slightly younger sister does show up with a flashlight. The two climb over the rock wall and look into the well and Caroline who isn't supposed to be looking yet sees a face in the well, but Annie sees nothing and believes that Caroline has stolen her man. While they are arguing Annie notices a body on the ground and they run for home to tell their dad and Abraham. It turns out the dead body is that of Mrs. Baine.

There is one thing that Annie and her Grandma, John's mother, and Juna have in common: the know-how. It comes fully on when a girl reaches her ascension. John's mother knew that Sarah would marry him and they'd have a happy life. She knew Sarah would be a sweet girl child and should be named Sarah. The difference between the Grandma and Annie and Juna is that they have deep black eyes that some say are filled with evil. People can't look them in the eyes and believe that they are up to no good. This was true of Juna.

In 1936 you see it through the eyes of Sarah and Juna scares her father who everyone believes is cursed. His crops are put in late and don't do well. The house was built in the shadows so it is always cold and damp. They have a younger brother Dale, whose birth took their mother's life, is ten years old and helps Sarah around the house while Juna works in the fields. But Dale is starting to look too soft and their Daddy wants him to go out with Juna one day in the fields and Sarah to go pick blackberries. But Juna says it's not a good day for Dale to go into the fields. Her father goes against what she says and later Dale goes missing. Juna won't talk about what happened. She seems like it's too much and she's too worn out to talk about it. But there is something else afoot. Because Joseph Carl will hang for something here.

Just like Annie cannot get any boy to notice her because of her harsh looks, and all the attention going to her sister Caroline the beautiful one with the curves and the lovely hair, Sarah cannot get anyone to notice her because of Juna's beauty. But both girls have someone who notices them, even though this person is not someone they are interested in. Sarah is pining away after Ellis Baine who has no idea she exists but is very much aware of Juna. And Annie seems to like Jacob Riddle who only has eyes for Caroline and Ryce Fulkerson who seems too interested in the girl who saw him in the well. Ellis Baine shows up with two of his brothers for his mother's funeral, but Ellis stays to clean up the place in order to sell it and perhaps to find out what really happened back in 1936, which causes problems for Sarah and John, as she thinks she still has feelings for him.

This is one hot summer that is boiling up for something to happen in 1952. In 1936 it is also summer and things there will boil over and scald a county permanently. This is an excellent book that the author got the idea for from the last public hanging that was held in Owensboro, Kentucky in 1936 for the rape of a girl. Even though he had also murdered her, he was only convicted of the rape so that they would be able to have the hanging be public. Murder convictions were private hangings. And the person who pulled the lever was a female sheriff, just like in this book. The crime was different in the book, though and she created a whole county from scratch. It was still very realistic and quite a tale.

Quotes
Grandma would have called it wishful thinking, and she always says nothing causes a person more harm than wishful thinking.

-Lori Roy (Let Me Die In His Footsteps p 45-6)

You like that he knows a thing for certain, Joseph Carl had written. You want someone who knows things, doesn’t hope for things, because hoping is common. Hoping is easy.

-Loir Roy (Let Me Die In His Footsteps p 155)

It’s a disturbing thing to know someone love you. It makes a person wonder why.

-Lori Roy (Let Me Die In His Footsteps p 238) ( )
  nicolewbrown | Dec 5, 2016 |
A complex mystery that alternates in time between 1935 and 1952. The storyline is haunting as we follow Sarah and her sister, raised by their father on a tobacco farm that is struggling to survive. Cold is how I felt reading about their childhood. The house was set in shadows, the father seemed to be unfeeling and the area was steeped in superstition that included one that said a girl half-way between her 15th and 16th years will at midnight see the man she will marry when she looks down a well. Sarah’s sister, Juna, is feared by many including her father. She is said to have witch-like properties. When Juna tells her father that she has been assaulted by a neighbor and their young brother kidnapped, the neighbor is convicted of a crime he did not commit. As an adult, Sarah, lives with the knowledge of what happened when her sister disappeared after giving birth to a girl born to Juna. The ending is unexpected. Roy has created a creepy story perfect for people who like a mystery with a very unexpected ending. ( )
  brangwinn | Oct 16, 2016 |
4.5 stars. My favorite of Roy's three books. Great character development and an intriguing plot. I enjoyed reading the story from the different perspectives - both past and present. Excellent read - highly recommend.

ARC from publisher. ( )
  Maureen_McCombs | Aug 19, 2016 |
This novel is well worth the read. It's entertaining and full of suspense. The book alternates between 1935 and 1952, and untangles the hidden secrets of two generations of the same families in the tobacco fields of Kentucky. Ms. Roy accurately captures the sluggishness of the lives of these characters and their need to hold onto aged superstitions. There is murder, child abuse, rape allegations, lust and a curious custom by which a 15 1/2 year old girl will stare into a well and see the face of the man she will marry. There is an old family feud, and a staged hanging that is loosely modeled after the last public hanging in the United States. I see that reviewers are likening this work to that of Faulkner and I can see the link. My thanks to the author and the Penguin First to Read program for a complimentary copy. ( )
  musichick52 | Nov 14, 2015 |
I recently read the excellent book Burial Rites BuriaRitesby Hannah Kent, inspired by the last public execution that took place in Iceland in 1830, so it is fitting that I move forward to Let Me Die in His Footsteps which is inspired by the last lawful public hanging in the United States, held in Owensboro, KY, in 1936. Lori Roy, winner of the Edgar Award for Best First BentRoadNovel for Bent Road, expanded this into “…an atmospheric suspense novel which opens with Annie Holleran sneaking away to her neighbor, the Baines’ well in the dead of night. Local folklore holds that if you look into a well at midnight, you will see the reflection of your future husband. But for Annie, the events of that evening have far-reaching consequences. There’s a rift between Annie’s family and the Baines—a gulf that dates back to when Annie’s Aunt Juna, a dark-eyed beauty, cast a spell over the Baines boys. Roy’s tale moves back and forth in time between Annie’s experiences in 1952 (told in third person), and those of her mother, Sarah (told in first person) and her sister Juna, in 1936 when one of the Baines sons was accused of a terrible crime.” (Source: Library Journal)

Let Me Die in His Footsteps is steeped in atmosphere. Roy describes life on the Holloran lavender farm in rural Kentucky in vivid detail, and the mystery of what happened years ago kept me reading into the night. It’s interesting that the folklore of the early 1900s stayed in force through mid-century and Annie, with the know-how or ability to sense events before they occur, was as feared as her Aunt Juna, almost twenty years earlier. Readers will picture the broken down shack that Sarah lived in, full of shadows and cold because it was built where the sun rarely shines. The rock wall fences separating the farms is straight out of 18th century pictures.

While the story of the public hanging is a small component of the story, the mob mentality surrounding the hanging is captured expertly.

Roy’s engaging story of young love, Southern folklore, family feuds, family skeletons and crimes of passion is bound to satisfy readers who enjoy a good, well told story. And don’t forget the surprise ending, which went nicely with the story. If you’re looking for a good beach/vacation read, this is perfect. ( )
  EdGoldberg | Jun 28, 2015 |
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"In the spellbinding and suspenseful Let Me Die in His Footsteps, Edgar Award-winner Lori Roy wrests from a Southern town the secrets of two families touched by an evil that has passed between generations. On a dark Kentucky night in 1952 exactly halfway between her fifteenth and sixteenth birthdays, Annie Holleran crosses into forbidden territory. Everyone knows Hollerans don't go near Baines, not since Joseph Carl was buried two decades before, but, armed with a silver-handled flashlight, Annie runs through her family's lavender fields toward the well on the Baines' place. At the stroke of midnight, she gazes into the water in search of her future. Not finding what she had hoped for, she turns from the well and when the body she sees there in the moonlight is discovered come morning, Annie will have much to explain and a past to account for. It was 1936, and there were seven Baine boys. That year, Annie's aunt, Juna Crowley, with her black eyes and her long blond hair, came of age. Before Juna, Joseph Carl had been the best of all the Baine brothers. But then he looked into Juna's eyes and they made him do things that cost innocent people their lives. Sheriff Irlene Fulkerson saw justice served-or did she? As the lavender harvest approaches and she comes of age as Aunt Juna did in her own time, Annie's dread mounts. Juna will come home now, to finish what she started. If Annie is to save herself, her family, and this small Kentucky town, she must prepare for Juna's return, and the revelation of what really happened all those years ago"--

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