Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

The Murder of Adam and Eve

de William Dietrich

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas
2211819,761 (3.45)Nenhum(a)
Sixteen-year-old Nick Brynner is thrust into prehistoric Africa to make a wrenching judgment - whether to save our genetic ancestors, the real-life "Adam" and "Eve" whose genes survive in all of us - or to consider saving the planet, and resetting human history, by eliminating this pair and trying again. Even as he fights for survival in a hostile environment, Nick and his ally Eleanor Terrell must struggle with the competing demands of love, humanity, civilization, and the pristine wild. This is a teen time-travel thriller that combines pulse-pounding excitement with big questions about our species and our role on earth. The adventure begins when Nick explores an old fort on a forbidden island for a high school history project and stumbles onto a time wormhole. Soon he finds himself in a nearby village that is mysteriously deserted and patrolled by a creature that looks like a gargoyle. He is saved from this monster by an enigmatic teen named Ellie. The pair are taken to a spaceship and given an awful test by a stern "angel-alien," and then thrust into an obstacle course testing their abilities to survive. The teens ultimately escape to the African savanna of 50,000 years ago to find and the genetic Adam and Eve - our common ancestors identified by recent DNA research. Adventures with lions, crocs, hippos and snakes form an odyssey that takes our heroes to a primitive tribe of humans and a society they must not just understand, but lead. Fire, pursuit, war, and betrayal lead to a chilling climax in which Nick must make a terrible choice - one which will provoke debate and thought in teen and adult readers alike.… (mais)
Nenhum(a)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Full review to come! ( )
  Floratina | Dec 7, 2019 |
I don't know about you, but I've been seduced by a nice cover and a cool title a couple of times in my life. Alright, it happens quite often...

The Murder of Adam and Eve is a book that I should have thought twice about before I decided to download it from NetGalley. Mostly because I usually try to stay away from YA, especially if it is a love story. But then again the blurb on NetGalley don't give away that much of the story and I think that I was blinded by the interesting cover to really care that it's all about two teenagers that must save the earth.

Apparently an alien raise called Xu has decided that Nick Brynner and Eleanor Terrell is the ones that have to decide if the human race is worth saving, and they have to go back in time to Africa and save the original Adam and Eve. Not the Bible Adam and Eve, but out genetic forebears. So Nick and Ellie have to adjust to the prehistoric life and also decide if the human race is worth saving or if the planet is better off without the humans.

I won't lie, I had a damn hard time getting into the story, but I felt that the book was way too short for me to quit. There was just something about the storyline that just didn't work for me, two people had to go back to the past to decide if the humans were worth saving? The explanation to why the alien race just didn't didn't decide for us comes at the end of the book and sound quite reasonable in a way (they must have a logical reason for not doing everything by themselves you know), even though I found it a mostly ludicrous. I mean there was some test in the beginning of the book they had to go through before they got sent back in the past, why? Why just not sent them back? No, let's make them go through some teamwork exercises first.

Of course Nick falls in love with Ellie, it's a love story, no matter that the human race has to be saved, there is time for some romance on the savanna.

So why the two-star rating? I was quite sure it would not be as good to earn more than one star, but the ending was better than I expected, and also more surprising than I expected. I still find the idea of a chosen person or two saving the whole world by going back in time quite ludicrous. And, I'm amazed that they actually survived out there before they found "Adam and Eve".

But still I can see that it would appeal to younger people that likes reading about teenagers saving the world. Personally? I will think twice the next time I see a book with a nice looking cover!

I want to thank the publisher and NetGalley for providing me with a free copy for an honest review! ( )
  MaraBlaise | May 19, 2019 |
The book did not grab me right away. But I did end up getting sucked into this world that had very believable characters. I enjoyed the faced paced action and the descriptions of the surroundings were wonderful. ( )
  Verkruissen | Sep 27, 2018 |
Nick Brynner is the school nerd, genuinely enjoying school work and a bit socially awkward. He and his mom are struggling financially, though, and if he wants to go to college, getting a scholarship would really help. With the help of a surprisingly long-term substitute teacher, Mr. Faunas, he sets to work on a research project for History Day.

As part of that project, he's going to visit an abandoned fort in Puget Sound, which has been off limits for almost a century. There are strange stories about people disappearing there, and mysterious forces, but that's ridiculous--isn't it?

Nick reaches the island, finds the remains of the fort, and after sketching a map of the place, investigates a staircase down into the ground, finds a locked door, finds the key...

He wakes up lying on the grass, and meets a girl, who introduces herself as Eleanor Terrell, and soon they are on an alien spaceship talking to a Xu, who has a little assignment for them. A game of sorts. The Xu think humans are too destructive, and Nick and Eleanor are going to be sent back to the time of our earliest human ancestors, genetic Adam & Eve, fifty thousand years ago. It will be up to them to decide if they deserve to be saved and the history we know preserved, or if there should be a Reset--the elimination of genetic Adam & Eve to allow another gene line, or even another species, to rule Earth.

Nick and Eleanor are both smart and thoughtful and, in their different ways, tough. Dietrich does a great job of showing us the African savanna fifty thousand years ago through Nick's eyes, and letting Nick really wrestle with the moral, practical, and personal issues raised by the challenge and threat of the Xu. I also find Dietrich's early homo sapiens plausible and interesting, though they may not be 100% accurate. (Our knowledge about them is advancing fast enough that it's quickly moving target.)

I'll further note, for those who notice such things, that yes, Dietrich does know that genetic Adam and genetic Eve weren't contemporaries; he's put them together for the sake of the story, and acknowledges that in an afterword.

All in all, this is a fun, interesting, and moderately thoughtful book. Recommended.

I received a free electronic galley of this book from the publisher via NetGalley. ( )
  LisCarey | Sep 19, 2018 |
The Murder of Adam and Eve finds sixteen year old Nick Brynner exploring an old abandoned fort on a forbidden island for a school project. He is then being chased in a deserted village by something that he thinks is a gargoyle. He escapes with the help of another teen, Ellie, and the pair are then sent to prehistoric Africa by an alien race called the Xu. The race is on to find Adam and Eve.

It's definitely an interesting and thought provoking read.

( )
  jenn88 | Apr 25, 2017 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

Sixteen-year-old Nick Brynner is thrust into prehistoric Africa to make a wrenching judgment - whether to save our genetic ancestors, the real-life "Adam" and "Eve" whose genes survive in all of us - or to consider saving the planet, and resetting human history, by eliminating this pair and trying again. Even as he fights for survival in a hostile environment, Nick and his ally Eleanor Terrell must struggle with the competing demands of love, humanity, civilization, and the pristine wild. This is a teen time-travel thriller that combines pulse-pounding excitement with big questions about our species and our role on earth. The adventure begins when Nick explores an old fort on a forbidden island for a high school history project and stumbles onto a time wormhole. Soon he finds himself in a nearby village that is mysteriously deserted and patrolled by a creature that looks like a gargoyle. He is saved from this monster by an enigmatic teen named Ellie. The pair are taken to a spaceship and given an awful test by a stern "angel-alien," and then thrust into an obstacle course testing their abilities to survive. The teens ultimately escape to the African savanna of 50,000 years ago to find and the genetic Adam and Eve - our common ancestors identified by recent DNA research. Adventures with lions, crocs, hippos and snakes form an odyssey that takes our heroes to a primitive tribe of humans and a society they must not just understand, but lead. Fire, pursuit, war, and betrayal lead to a chilling climax in which Nick must make a terrible choice - one which will provoke debate and thought in teen and adult readers alike.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.45)
0.5
1
1.5
2 3
2.5
3 2
3.5
4 4
4.5
5 2

GenreThing

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 160,255,814 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível