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The Small House at Allington

de Anthony Trollope

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

Séries: The Barsetshire Chronicles (5)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
1,510378,760 (4.05)4 / 224
Engaged to the ambitious and self-serving Adolphus Crosbie, Lily Dale is devastated when he jilts her for the aristocratic Lady Alexandrina. Although crushed by his faithlessness, Lily still believes she is bound to her unworthy former fiance for life and therefore condemned to remain single after his betrayal. And when a more deserving suitor pays his addresses, she is unable to see past her feelings for Crosbie. Written when Trollope was at the height of his popularity, The Small House at Allington (1864) contains his most admired heroine in Lily Dale - a young woman of independent spirit who nonetheless longs to be loved - and is a moving dramatization of the ways in which personal dilemmas are affected by social pressures.… (mais)
  1. 00
    The Odd Women de George Gissing (potenza)
    potenza: I found a lot of the tone of the intractable Lily Dale and difficult relationships in The Odd Women.
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Mostrando 1-5 de 37 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I think I liked this book the least of the series. For one thing, Allington isn’t even in Barsetshire, and so most of the colorful characters from the previous novels don’t reappear, except for the members of the de Courcy family. I was also frustrated trying to figure out Mr. Crosbie’s motives – both for making and breaking the engagement. I also think it's safe to say that "friend-zoning" is nothing new.

At least to me, these characters seemed the least like real people in the entire series so far, and the ending just didn’t really seem satisfying in any sense. I stuck with the book primarily because I wanted to be able to follow the next novel in the series, which Trollope regarded as one of his best works. Plus, there are six books in the series and this is the fifth, so at this point giving up on the series really wouldn’t make a lot of sense – and the book wasn’t that bad.

And there were good parts as well. As usual, Trollope was right on the money when it came to describing our views of beauty, substance, and celebrity when he described Lady Dumbello as, “given to smile when addressed, but her usual smile was meaningless, almost leaden, and never in any degree flattering to the person to whom it was accorded” and as contributing “nothing to society but her cold, hard beauty, her gait, and her dress” but adding that “we may say that she contributed enough, for society acknowledged itself to be deeply indebted to her.” Ouch.

Other redeeming factors:

Mr. Crosbie’s brief encounter and conversation with Mr. Harding in Barchester

Plantagenet Palliser and Lady Glencora (of the Palliser series, also by Trollope) are introduced

Another name for the win: Major Fiasco

Trollopian style

Good quotes:

“It is sometimes easier to life a couple of hundredweights than to raise a few thoughts in one’s mind…”

“…but now, even already, although the possession to which he had looked was not yet garnered, he was beginning to tell himself that the thing was not worth possessing.”

“Alexandrina of course carried her point, the countess reflecting with a maternal devotion equal almost to that of the pelican, that the earl could not do more than kill her.”

“Oh, deliver us from the poverty of those who, with small means, affect a show of wealth! There is no whitening equal to that of sepulchers whited as they are whited!”

“To have loved truly, even though you shall have loved in vain, will be a consolation when you are as old as I am. It is something to have had a heart.” ( )
  Jennifer708 | Mar 23, 2020 |
I think I liked this book the least of the series. For one thing, Allington isn’t even in Barsetshire, and so most of the colorful characters from the previous novels don’t reappear, except for the members of the de Courcy family. I was also frustrated trying to figure out Mr. Crosbie’s motives – both for making and breaking the engagement. I also think it's safe to say that "friend-zoning" is nothing new.

At least to me, these characters seemed the least like real people in the entire series so far, and the ending just didn’t really seem satisfying in any sense. I stuck with the book primarily because I wanted to be able to follow the next novel in the series, which Trollope regarded as one of his best works. Plus, there are six books in the series and this is the fifth, so at this point giving up on the series really wouldn’t make a lot of sense – and the book wasn’t that bad.

And there were good parts as well. As usual, Trollope was right on the money when it came to describing our views of beauty, substance, and celebrity when he described Lady Dumbello as, “given to smile when addressed, but her usual smile was meaningless, almost leaden, and never in any degree flattering to the person to whom it was accorded” and as contributing “nothing to society but her cold, hard beauty, her gait, and her dress” but adding that “we may say that she contributed enough, for society acknowledged itself to be deeply indebted to her.” Ouch.

Other redeeming factors:

Mr. Crosbie’s brief encounter and conversation with Mr. Harding in Barchester

Plantagenet Palliser and Lady Glencora (of the Palliser series, also by Trollope) are introduced

Another name for the win: Major Fiasco

Trollopian style

Good quotes:

“It is sometimes easier to life a couple of hundredweights than to raise a few thoughts in one’s mind…”

“…but now, even already, although the possession to which he had looked was not yet garnered, he was beginning to tell himself that the thing was not worth possessing.”

“Alexandrina of course carried her point, the countess reflecting with a maternal devotion equal almost to that of the pelican, that the earl could not do more than kill her.”

“Oh, deliver us from the poverty of those who, with small means, affect a show of wealth! There is no whitening equal to that of sepulchers whited as they are whited!”

“To have loved truly, even though you shall have loved in vain, will be a consolation when you are as old as I am. It is something to have had a heart.” ( )
  Jennifer708 | Mar 23, 2020 |
A long novel but enjoyable every minute. David Shaw-Parker is an extraordinary narrator. I was sorry that the book came to an end. Looking forward to my next Trollope. ( )
  njcur | Jan 13, 2020 |
2019 reread via LibriVox recording:
I still don't like Lily Dale!
---------
Simon Vance does a marvelous job narrating this 5th entry in Trollope's Barsetshire series. Unfortunately, this novel is less amusing - more of a straightforward romance, with sickly sweet Lily Dale as the heroine. ( )
  leslie.98 | Jun 18, 2019 |
Continuing my leisurely reread of the Barchester series, I jumped ahead of Dr. Thorne and started reading this one. I last read it many years ago and remembered very little. It turns out to be a novel full of marriage plots and the consequences of falling in love and choosing (or refusing) to wed. Our central characters, inhabitants of the title dwelling, are Isabel and Lily Dale, two sisters who lived with their widowed mother in the small grace-and-favour house owned by their uncle, Squire Dale, of Allington. Bell and Lily are lovely, charming, and completely appealing. Bell is the practical one, Lily is the impulsive and intense one. Bell refuses to marry her cousin, Bernard, who is the Squire's heir, while Lily falls madly in love with dashing man about town Crosbie, who comes down to Allington with Bertrand.

But Crosbie is unworthy of Lily; as soon as he discovers that the Squire is not going to settle money on Lily, he becomes dissatisfied with the situation and finds himself drawn to Lady Alexandrina, one of the younger daughters of the horrible de Courcy family. He jilts Lily, and it looks as if Lily and Bell might wind up living with their mother forever, and even moving from the Small House because of the Squire's apparent displeasure at Bell's intransigence where Bernard is concerned.

As always, Trollope draws his characters with equal parts acuity and sympathy Even the awful Lady Alexandrina, whom he spares not at all, is rendered in a complex way (she's not complex, but her depiction is). The Squire is a man who feels strongly but is most comfortable expressing his negative emotions and suppressing his positive ones, and his interactions with Mrs. Dale and her daughters are beautifully done.

The subplots involve Johnny Eames, a low-level civil servant who is in love with Lily, and his travails in London, and also Crosby's London life. Trollope contrasts the career tracks of these young men with their personal travails; each ascends in one as he descends in the other, and we get to read about the bureaucratic antics of the wonderfully named Mr. Optimist, Sir Raffle Buffle, and others.

Lily Dale is hated by many readers, and it's easy to understand why. She treats her jilting as comparable to widowhood and continues to hold on to her love for a man who in no way deserved it. It's annoying, but the way I read it was that having given herself and her emotions to Crosbie so thoroughly, Lily couldn't justify her behavior unless it was based on an undying love. It's a kind of strange but fascinating characterization.

I enjoyed all 826 pages, but that's a lot of Dale to spend time with, especially Lily. I'll go backward to Dr. Thorne next, before sinking in to the brilliance of the last installment. ( )
  Sunita_p | May 17, 2019 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Trollope, AnthonyAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Birch, DinahIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Kincaid, James R.Editorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Millais, John EverettIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Reddick, PeterIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Skilton, DavidIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Symons, JulianIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Thompson-Furnival, JulianIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tillotson, KathleenIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Trollope, JoannaIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Vance, SimonNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
West, TimothyNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Of course there was a Great House at Allington.
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The door of the big room was opened, and Mr Kissing shuffled in with very quick little steps. He shuffled in and coming direct up to John’s desk, flopped his ledger down upon it. . .. ‘I have been half the morning, Mr Eames, looking for this letter to the Admiralty, and you’ve put it under S!’ A bystander listening to Mr Kissing’s tone would have been led to believe that the whole Income-tax Office was jeopardised by the terrible iniquity thus disclosed.
‘Somerset House,’ pleaded Johnny.
‘Psha; —Somerset House! Half the offices in London—’
‘You’d better ask Mr Love,’ said Eames. ‘It’s all done under his special instructions.’ Mr Kissing looked at Mr Love, and Mr Love looked steadfastly at his desk. ‘Mr Love knows all about the indexing,’ continued Johnny. ‘He’s index master general to the department.
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Engaged to the ambitious and self-serving Adolphus Crosbie, Lily Dale is devastated when he jilts her for the aristocratic Lady Alexandrina. Although crushed by his faithlessness, Lily still believes she is bound to her unworthy former fiance for life and therefore condemned to remain single after his betrayal. And when a more deserving suitor pays his addresses, she is unable to see past her feelings for Crosbie. Written when Trollope was at the height of his popularity, The Small House at Allington (1864) contains his most admired heroine in Lily Dale - a young woman of independent spirit who nonetheless longs to be loved - and is a moving dramatization of the ways in which personal dilemmas are affected by social pressures.

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Penguin Australia

2 edições deste livro foram publicadas por Penguin Australia.

Edições: 0140433252, 0141199652

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