Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Hand to Mouth: Living in Bootstrap America…
Carregando...

Hand to Mouth: Living in Bootstrap America (original: 2014; edição: 2014)

de Linda Tirado (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3192562,184 (3.7)22
"I've been waiting for this book for a long time. Well, not this book, because I never imagined that the book I was waiting for would be so devastatingly smart and funny, so consistently entertaining and unflinchingly on target. In fact, I would like to have written it myself - if, that is, I had lived Linda Tirado's life and extracted all the hard lessons she has learned. I am the author of Nickel and Dimed, which tells the story of my own brief attempt, as a semi-undercover journalist, to survive on low-wage retail and service jobs. Tirado is the real thing." -from the foreword by Barbara Ehrenreich, New York Times bestselling author of Nickel and Dimed We in America have certain ideas of what it means to be poor. Linda Tirado, in her signature brutally honest yet personable voice, takes all of these preconceived notions and smashes them to bits. She articulates not only what it is to be working poor in America (yes, you can be poor and live in a house and have a job, even two), but what poverty is truly like-on all levels. In her thought-provoking voice, Tirado discusses how she went from lower-middle class, to sometimes middle class, to poor and everything in between, and in doing so reveals why "poor people don't always behave the way middle-class America thinks they should." --"An examination of what it means to be poor in America today"--… (mais)
Membro:jorgexma
Título:Hand to Mouth: Living in Bootstrap America
Autores:Linda Tirado (Autor)
Informação:G.P. Putnam's Sons (2014), 194 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:to-read, non-fiction

Detalhes da Obra

Hand to Mouth: Living in Bootstrap America de Linda Tirado (2014)

Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 22 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 25 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
3.5 stars, if I could give half ratings. The end lost me a bit. The author started to meander and her argument seemed less cohesive. As a whole, though, Tirado's treatise on poverty in America felt honest and raw. I found myself nodding along with righteous indignation right from the start. Hand to Mouth could be taken as a call to arms. We (society as a whole) cannot be okay with the sort of stagnation and inherent inequalities that exist for an overwhelming segment of the population. Tirado shines light on many problems and offers her own personal opinion on said problems. She shares her real experiences "living in bootstrap America," but it is going to take a sea change to make anything better. She is very careful to point out that she is not making any grand claims to be the mouthpiece of a whole set of people. Yet, the author effectively blows the lid off of many nasty stereotypes of so-called lower class people. Tirado writes, "That poverty is not a 'culture' or a character defect; it is a shortage of money." If nothing else, that is the take home message from her work. ( )
  mbellucci | Apr 10, 2021 |
Let's not "bury the lead." Tirado's message is a critically important one — especially in this era. People in every income strata would benefit from the author's pointed insights. But I have two fundamental problems with "Hand to Mouth." The first involves content. The second involves literary tone. Let's start with content. This enlightening and often entertaining book was born after the author posted an essay on a web forum that answered someone's question about why many impoverished people make "self-destructive" decisions. Her pithy post went viral. Publications picked it up. She ultimately decided to turn it into a book. Here's the problem: There's just not quite enough content to justify a book-length manuscript -- even a slim volume. A three-part series of 2,500-word essays? Absolutely. Perhaps even a four-parter? Maybe. But there's a lot of redundancy here — slightly different anecdotes or insights served up to illustrate the same points that were adequately hit in earlier sections (why low-income people smoke, why they can't save, etc.) The second issue is literary tone. I had the distinct feeling throughout the book that there was an undercurrent of hosility and bitterness. I get it. Although I was born in a lower-middle class environment, I'm now grateful to be a financially-stable middle class guy. I've never had to live hand-to-mouth. Still, many of us who are at decent income tiers aren't entitled, nasty, greedy, ungrateful oafs who look down on others. We're good tippers. We try to "connect" with folks in the service sector. We enthusiastically support safety nets. Maybe it's just me, but I sensed a persistent thread of hostility. Tirado admits that she's angry a lot of the time. I give her credit for honesty. But the underlying hostility didn't underscore the message for me. It undermined it. When it comes to writing, Tirado is a skilled storyteller. I just wish she hadn't decided to make the F-word a frequent visitor in the manuscript. Believe me, I'm no prude. I even occasionally use the word. But I think the repeated use diminishes the message. True, the author explained early on that this is how she talks. I'm sure it was included to heighten authenticity. But I stopped counting after the tenth F-bomb. She even ended the tome by thanking many people and then adding: "Four of you can go F*!# yourself." Really? Having said all this, I'm glad I read the book. It's a vivid reminder of the inequities that exist. ( )
1 vote brianinbuffalo | Feb 29, 2020 |
Although it is already dated by the Draconian budget cuts made since 2017, this is still the best book I know that described what working poor people's lives are like. I haven't been poor for some time, but I haven't forgotten the desperate work schedules, the beat up car that is a necessity one prays will not die on the way to or from work and the tough decisions about what to spend my limited resources on. And I was a single male at the time, not a married mother of two. If you think poor people are responsible for their own problems, read this book and then read a more dispassionate economic treatise on why poverty affects so many Americans. And, as Tirado might have written, "and I'm a youngish white woman." Then imagine the predicament of a young black male. ( )
  nmele | Aug 4, 2019 |
A first person account of what it is like to be poor in America and why poor people make bad decisions. As bad as the poverty itself is being treated as if having no money is a crime. (It could be argued that having too much money is a crime). ( )
  jwrudn | Mar 19, 2018 |
Makes you think about what it's like to be poor I only somewhat followed the drama that followed the publication of Tirado's essay on poverty and being poor. She was accused of being fake, of lying, of how her experiences didn't match those of others, etc. But clearly her work hit a nerve with people, being published in several outlets and eventually leading to this book.
 
Her original piece is included in this book and is arguably the best part. The rest of the book is divided into chapters about various issues that face the poor: medical insurance, welfare, sex and reproductive health, the criminalization/punishment of the poor for being poor, etc. Some of it is painful to read. Some of it is just not very well-written, which for me is a constant problem when people try to expand articles/essays for newspapers/magazines for a full-length book.
 
But a lot of it echoes what many go through. The assumption that she is a meth addict. That if she just tried harder, she'd pull herself out of the hole. That she had sex irresponsibly (ie, she is unable to care for her children with little to no income). That she indulges in things like smoking (which she admits is unhealthy, but is one of the few outlets available to her).
 
I can't say I found it to be a page-turning. Sometimes she comes across as whiny and obnoxious (she had access to The Pill, for example, but wasn't consistent in taking it). To her credit, Tirado admits this. She shows how both circumstances and some of her own choices led her to her situation, and there's no way to know that if she had made all the "right" choices she'd be fine.
 
It's food for thought and unfortunately I'll bet a lot of people should read this won't. Definitely recommend reading her essay, which is still available online. ( )
1 vote HoldMyBook | Feb 11, 2018 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 25 (seguinte | mostrar todas)

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Linda Tiradoautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Ehrenreich, BarbaraIntroduçãoautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For Tom, who can't say I didn't warn him
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
In the fall of 2013, I was in my first semester of school in a decade.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico
"I've been waiting for this book for a long time. Well, not this book, because I never imagined that the book I was waiting for would be so devastatingly smart and funny, so consistently entertaining and unflinchingly on target. In fact, I would like to have written it myself - if, that is, I had lived Linda Tirado's life and extracted all the hard lessons she has learned. I am the author of Nickel and Dimed, which tells the story of my own brief attempt, as a semi-undercover journalist, to survive on low-wage retail and service jobs. Tirado is the real thing." -from the foreword by Barbara Ehrenreich, New York Times bestselling author of Nickel and Dimed We in America have certain ideas of what it means to be poor. Linda Tirado, in her signature brutally honest yet personable voice, takes all of these preconceived notions and smashes them to bits. She articulates not only what it is to be working poor in America (yes, you can be poor and live in a house and have a job, even two), but what poverty is truly like-on all levels. In her thought-provoking voice, Tirado discusses how she went from lower-middle class, to sometimes middle class, to poor and everything in between, and in doing so reveals why "poor people don't always behave the way middle-class America thinks they should." --"An examination of what it means to be poor in America today"--

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.7)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 4
2.5 2
3 23
3.5 5
4 25
4.5 4
5 14

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 158,882,998 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível