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Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in…
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Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End (edição: 2014)

de Atul Gawande (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3,7802352,453 (4.45)524
Gawande, a practicing surgeon, addresses his profession's ultimate limitation, arguing that quality of life is the desired goal for patients and families of the terminally ill.
Membro:apedelamare
Título:Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End
Autores:Atul Gawande (Autor)
Informação:Metropolitan Books (2014), Edition: 1, 304 pages
Coleções:Living Room
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Being Mortal: Illness, Medicine and What Matters in the End de Atul Gawande

  1. 10
    Final Exam: A Surgeon's Reflections on Mortality de Pauline W. Chen (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: Written by experienced and dedicated physicians, these compelling books question American health care's emphasis on management and technique to the detriment of human relationships between doctors and patients, especially when the patient's mortality is an important consideration.… (mais)
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Mostrando 1-5 de 238 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
This book spent way too long on my TBR pile. Like many other readers, it should be more widely read as it raises a number of very important issues in how we treat the elderly. Simply stated, medicine is not enough. Gawande does an excellent job navigating the research on how the elderly want to live versus many poor choices and a few good ones; he also weaves in the story of his own father's mortality as a surgeon, his questions about treatments, the decisions he faced, and how timing played a pivotal role. Some of the innovative ideas around living in smaller groups, integrating animals or youth into the routine, allowing more choice in how/when or even if things happened. There is no panacea -- the answers depend on the person. Very thought provoking. Recommended to all. ( )
  skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
Should be required reading for anyone with sick friends or family members ... or just getting older. (I qualify on all counts.) Gawande's prose is clear and heart-felt, and the stories/anecdotes hit close to, er, home. ( )
  markburris | Jul 11, 2021 |
This may be one of the most important and enlightening books I've ever read. With the huge population of Baby Boomers now between 51 and 69, and my own Generation X barreling toward AARP eligibility age, there is no time to spare for us as a society to come to terms with our mortality and to get creative about dealing with aging, physical decline, and death in ways that respect our desire to live our lives meaningfully. Only by acknowledging our near-universal terror of spending our waning years living a medical nightmare can we make choices that prevent that from happening. In Being Mortal Atul Gawande spends time with so many fascinating people (nursing home doctors, assisted living pioneers, palliative care specialists and hospice providers) who are at the forefront of challenging accepted ideas of how aging and terminally ill people must be treated. He also slows down and questions his own ways of being a doctor to spend time listening to patients and senior citizens so that he might really understand their goals for their remaining time on earth. Finally, his own father's shocking decline from vital, energetic, tennis-playing, Rotarian urologist to struggling cancer patient lends a personal angle that brings his message home. Although reading Being Mortal can be a rough and emotional ride (a few of his terminal patients are not old at all!), Dr. Gawande is ultimately hopeful, and his research and the influence his book has had already may go a long way towards reversing the trend towards over-medicalized end-of-life care that has been the norm for too many decades. I sure hope so! ( )
  CaitlinMcC | Jul 11, 2021 |
Started the year off right with this one. Changed my life and quite possibly changed my career path. Thank you, Atul, for shifting my perspective on the last stage of our live, how the medical profession copes and rises with responsibility, and how each of us grapples with autonomy and what matters most when faced with death. ( )
  booksforbrunch | May 4, 2021 |
Written with great clarity and tact on the difficult subject of dying with dignity. Gawande laments the over-medicalization of death and end-of-life care, where technology and medicine are wielded to optimize on the narrow metric of prolonged life, even at the cost of autonomy, quality, and meaning. Instead he urges us to think more holistically about what matters most, what we fear, and what trade-offs we’re willing to make. A thoughtful, important start to a conversation everyone should have. ( )
  jiyoungh | May 3, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 238 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
His new book, “Being Mortal,” is a personal meditation on how we can better live with age-related frailty, serious illness and approaching death.

It is also a call for a change in the philosophy of health care. Gawande writes that members of the medical profession, himself included, have been wrong about what their job is. Rather than ensuring health and survival, it is “to enable well-being.”
adicionado por melmore | editarNew York Times, Sheri Fink (Nov 6, 2014)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (8 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Gawande, Atulautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Petkoff, RobertNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Pradera, AlejandroTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Röckel, SusanneÜbersetzerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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I see it now—this world is swiftly passing.
—the warrior Karna, in the Mahabharata

They come to rest at any kerb:
All streets in time are visited.
—Philip Larkin, "Ambulances"
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I learned about a lot of things in medical school, but mortality wasn't one of them.
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Modern scientific capability has profoundly altered the course of human life. People live longer and better than at any other time in history. But scientific advances have turned the processes of aging and dying into medical experiences, matters to be managed by health care professionals. And we in the medical profession have proved alarmingly unprepared for it.
In other words, our decision making in medicine has failed so spectacularly that we have reached the point of actively inflicting harm on patients rather than confronting the subject of mortality. If end-of-life discussions were an experimental drug, the FDA would approve it.
The simple view is that medicine exists to fight death and disease, and that is, of course, its most basic task. Death is the enemy. But the enemy has superior forces. Eventually, it wins. And in a war that you cannot win, you don't want a general who fights to the point of total annihilation. You don't want Custer. You want Robert E. Lee, someone who knows how to fight for territory that can be won and how to surrender it when it can't, someone who understands that the damage is greatest if all you do is battle to the bitter end.
… our driving motivations in life, instead of remaining constant, change hugely over time and in ways that don’t quite fit Maslow’s classic hierarchy. In young adulthood, people seek a life of growth and self-fulfillment, just as Maslow suggested. Growing up involves opening outward. We search out new experiences, wider social connections, and ways of putting our stamp on the world. When people reach the latter part of adulthood, however, their priorities change markedly. Most reduce the amount of time they spend pursuing achievement and social networks. They narrow in. Given the choice, young people prefer meeting new people to spending time with, say, a sibling; old people prefer the opposite. Studies find that as people grow older they interact with fewer people and concentrate more on spending time with family and established friends. They focus on being rather than doing and on the present more than the future.
Life is choices, and they are relentless. No sooner have you made one choice than another is upon you.
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Gawande, a practicing surgeon, addresses his profession's ultimate limitation, arguing that quality of life is the desired goal for patients and families of the terminally ill.

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