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1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed…
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1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed (Turning Points in Ancient… (original: 2014; edição: 2015)

de Eric H. Cline (Autor), Eric H. Cline (Posfácio)

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9273717,584 (3.65)30
"In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium B.C., which had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia, suddenly ceased to exist, along with writing systems, technology, and monumental architecture. But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown. How did it happen? In this major new account of the causes of this "First Dark Ages," Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries. A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age--and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece"--… (mais)
Membro:NatWalk
Título:1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed (Turning Points in Ancient History, 1)
Autores:Eric H. Cline (Autor)
Outros autores:Eric H. Cline (Posfácio)
Informação:Princeton University Press (2015), Edition: Revised, 264 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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1177 BCE: The Year Civilization Collapsed de Eric H. Cline (2014)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 36 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Loved this book. Sent me down a rabbit hole investigating all these Bronze Age cultures as I needed to know more! ( )
  ReaderWriterRunner | Jul 27, 2021 |
As cliché as it is, history books with this kind of topic are the most exciting to read. Not only is it about a catastrophic event, it discusses the possibilities of how this event happened — or, at the very least, how it may have happened (because at this point in time, and with how much time has elapsed between 1177 B.C. and A.D. 2014, speculation is all historians and scholars can do). My only issue — not that it’s that important — is that he used B.C. (Before Christ) instead of B.C.E. (Before Common Era); the only difference between the two is that B.C.E. has less of a religious tone than B.C. Other than that, I really liked this book and do recommend it. ( )
  historybookreads | Jul 26, 2021 |
The Late Bronze Age civilizations of the eastern Mediterranean met with a catastrophic collapse in the 12th century B.C.E. Historians commonly attribute this to an invasion of people called the "Sea People" overwhelming Egypt's military in 1177 B.C.E. In Cline's evaluation of the evidence, the Sea People may have actually been refugees of war, natural disasters, and/or a climate crisis. Evidence exists for a cluster of earthquakes, droughts, and internal rebellions at the time before the arrival of the Sea People. The combination of the multiple catastrophes could have lead to the collapse.

The book is sprawling in both time in place as Cline sums up several centuries of history leading up to the collapse of several civilizations including the Greeks, Myceneans, Minoans, Hittites, Assyrians, Cypriots, Canaanites, and Egyptians. Along the way Cline explores the historic origins of the famed stories of Exodus and the Trojan War. Cline is good at explaining what we can learn from written records and archaeological finds, and how both of these have to be interpreted. He's also good at noting that there typically isn't enough evidence to know what happened precisely and how historians develop theories based on the facts we know.

Other interesting facts I learned from this book:

  • Hatshepsut, who ruled as Pharaoh upon the death of her husband, wore a Pharaonic false beard and men's clothing and was addressed as "His Majesty."

  • Kings of different nations who were not related used kinship terms like "father" and "son" when addressing one another, creating an artificial family relationship.

  • a new type of glue was invented for archaeologists recovering copper ingots from the Uluburun shipwreck to allow them to bring the artifacts up in one piece.

( )
1 vote Othemts | Jun 28, 2021 |
The Late Bronze Age Collapse is uncomfortable to read about, at least for me. Over the span of a few decades, civilizations around the whole Eastern Mediterranean, one of the most pleasant locations on earth, disintegrated in fire and bloodshed, and no one really knows why. The destruction was so total in many places that even the memories of these disasters are faded, because no one was left alive to write about them, save for in a few places like Egypt which somehow escaped. That's the last time, to the best of our understanding, when a large cluster of civilizations collapsed to leave barely ruins behind, and though I've read competing theories about exactly how the entire eastern Mediterranean transformed into ghosts - most notably, Robert Drews' theory of warfare shifts in The End of the Bronze Age - Cline's synthesis of what's known about that time period combines archeology, demography, analysis of trade routes, recent translations, and some good old-fashioned speculation to offer about as good an overview of the mysterious Sea Peoples and their role in what was essentially the end of the world as you're likely to find. ( )
  aaronarnold | May 11, 2021 |
Don't let the title fool you -- civilization didn't actually collapse in 1177. Rather, several cities and city-states faced disasters of an unknown type at unknown dates for unknown reasons. The book is interesting as an overview of the Late Bronze Age collapse, but it doesn't tell much of a story. Despite the poppy title and cover, it's definitely better for grad students than for neophytes to the time period. ( )
  poirotketchup | Mar 18, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 36 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
This book by Eric Cline is the first in the series Turning Points in Ancient History edited by Barry Strauss. In the words of Strauss, this series “looks at a crucial event or key moment in the ancient world”, and the series seems targeted—judging from this first book—at a broad audience of both students and experts in the field. Cline’s book takes as its crucial event the battle between Ramses III of Egypt and the so-called Sea Peoples in 1177 B.C., a point in history that marked the end of the Late Bronze Age in the Eastern Mediterranean. Cline is careful not to suggest that this battle alone was responsible for the wave of destructions dated to the beginning of the twelfth-century; rather, he treats this battle as a point of departure for addressing a variety of calamities—both natural and anthropogenic—that affected much of the Eastern Mediterranean and brought an end to the Late Bronze Age.
 

» Adicionar outros autores (3 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Cline, Eric H.autor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Belza, CeciliaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Strauss, BarryPrefácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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"In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium B.C., which had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia, suddenly ceased to exist, along with writing systems, technology, and monumental architecture. But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown. How did it happen? In this major new account of the causes of this "First Dark Ages," Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries. A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age--and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece"--

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