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The Norse Myths (Pantheon Fairy Tale and…
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The Norse Myths (Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library) (original: 1980; edição: 1981)

de Kevin Crossley-Holland

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1,848186,697 (4.02)6
The extraordinary Scandinavian myth cycle is one of the most enduring, exciting, dramatic and compelling of the world's great stories. A series of intertwined tales which together form a strange and fantastical world teeming with gods and goddesses, heroes and monsters, battles and couplings, the Norse myths are as exciting to read as they are of vast cultural and historical importance. Taking us from the creation of the world through the building of Asgard's Wall to the final end in Ragnorak, and featuring the exploits and adventures of such legendary figures as Odin, Thor and Loki, The Penguin Book of the Norse Mythsbrings alive the passion, cruelty and heroism of these unforgettable stories.… (mais)
Membro:dualravens
Título:The Norse Myths (Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library)
Autores:Kevin Crossley-Holland
Informação:Pantheon (1981), Paperback, 320 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

The Norse Myths de Kevin Crossley-Holland (1980)

  1. 10
    Norse Myths (Children's Adaptation) de Kevin Crossley-Holland (Michael.Rimmer)
  2. 00
    Mythology de Edith Hamilton (RickyHaas)
    RickyHaas: Both books center on mythology (obviously). The Norse Myths is more focused on a specific mythology. Whereas Mythology is a broader scope with a heavier focus on Greek/Roman Mythology.
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I bought this collection of myths to expand my (small) collection of books about the Vikings. Having read a few books on the subject (incl. the [b:The Prose Edda|24658|The Prose Edda|Snorri Sturluson|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1388200536s/24658.jpg|1198450] by [a:Snorri Sturluson|13879|Snorri Sturluson|https://d.gr-assets.com/authors/1208866690p2/13879.jpg]), I thought it would be fun reading again about the myths and what not of this era.

Kevin Crossley-Holland made a selection of myths, basing himself on various sagas and books written by various authors. In the large introduction he gives a detailed explanation of the Norse pantheon, the cosmology, the nine worlds, and so on.

Then comes the selection of 32 myths, which are placed in a chronological order: "(...) this collection which forms a complete cycle, beginning with the creation and ending with the destruction of the nine worlds, (...)". And you can read about Loki's mischiefs, his deceiving of the other gods, how Thor and Odin aren't exactly all that peaceful, how others are. There are also several stories about theft, love, murder, death, ... The gods sure were a peaceful lot. *cough*

For each myth, Kevin wrote an extensive note on:
- where he found it (sources: sagas and other books)
- how each myth compares to other versions (being either more complete or even shorter)
- comparisons with other nations' myths (India, Iran, etc...) and how sometimes the similarities can't be a coincidence. So, not all myths are 100% original. Or even written in Iceland. Likewise when comparing religions and its figures/characters, when there are similar figures/gods in other religions. Which leads to the question: why bother fighting/quarrelling about it, even waging war for it?

The glossary holds a list of names of the gods, giants, dwarfs, realms, etc... with their main function/responsibility/meaning.

And of course, there's, at the end, a list of books the author consulted (at least, he wrote that not all the books in this list were used), divided into different categories. ( )
  TechThing | Jan 22, 2021 |
I own the Folio Society edition, which I read and will re-read. This edition is part of Penguin's Pantheon series, and is worth keeping for the black-and-white illustrations. The Folio's illustrations are good, yes: but it's worth retaining this copy for an illustration of the Norse cosmos alone (I do wonder how it compares to other renderings), and the remaining illustrations all differ from the Folio edition's. (A pity the illustrator is uncredited, even on Penguin's website.)

The text appears to be very similar if not identical to the Folio Society edition.
  elenchus | Aug 29, 2019 |
All parts are eminently useful: Crossley-Holland's retellings adopt a pleasing tone, his selection never neglecting the big three (Odin, Loki, Thor) but attentive to less popular characters so as to serve up a rounded portrait of the myths. The introduction is meatier than expected, the notes detailed as to sources as well as Crossley-Holland's decisions regarding what to keep, what to change, how best to adapt contradictory or mutually exclusive versions. Anglo-Saxon words, he notes, are preferred to others of Greek or Latinate origin. Crossley-Holland conveys his enthusiasm as well as his admiration for the myths here, as well as for those who told them.

This was an ideal return to the stories, my appetite for the myths themselves whetted by Davidson's survey. No question but that I'll revisit these, and the edition is a fine one in both design and illustrations. Lydbury's headpieces are as detailed and varied as her larger woodcuts, incorporating Norse motifs such as wildlife and nautical knots, armour and landscape.

//

Vikings defined as Danes, Swedes, Norwegians living between 780-1070 AD, who in part due to overcrowding + primogeniture were compelled to adventure South, East, and West, with resulting profound cultural influences. The Norse settled Iceland, where many of these myths ultimately were written down. (Are there no other Icelanders than those descended from Vikings? Greenland?)

A key characteristic of Icelandic culture (unfamiliar to me): always a republic, no tradition of kingdoms and monarchy. Yet the Danes were steeped in it, The Song of Rig emphasizes this, and the Swedes and Norwegians also have strong lines of royalty. If Iceland settled by Scandinavians organised under royalty, interesting that royalty rejected in Iceland. Political parallels with USA, have these been noted before? But of course a different scale, at least ultimately, perhaps as clear an example of modernity's influence as any.

Loki's character arc interesting: here he is always the "boon companion" to Thor and Odin (and H), but in the myths told here he also evolves from trickster to evil nemesis. Does that character arc mirror a transformation found within the larger Norse chronology, or merely emerge as selected and arranged here? And assuming it is found in Loki's character generally, what does it portend: a cultural shift or religious theme, or merely reflecting a preference of audiences who wanted Loki to get more fiercely and intensely and unapologetically Loki, and not be merely a figure of fun? ( )
1 vote elenchus | Feb 25, 2017 |
We are all familiar with the Norse Gods, whether we know it or not. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday are named after three of them, the Vikings occupied large parts of England and their culture was assimilated into ours. But even so, the Greek Myths seem to be held in higher esteem for the simple reason that the Victorians looked to the classical world for inspiration rather than the rather bloodier tales of our Norse neighbours.

The Norse belief that only through fame in this life would your name live on is reflected in these lusty and violent tales. The Gods are forever fighting the Giants or the Dwarfs, carousing, eating drinking and living life to the full. These are tales of Thor and his mighty Hammer Mjollnir, Odin the Allfather, one-handed Tyr, Sif of the Golden Hair and the Trickster Loki, possibly the most interesting character here.

As the tales progress (and chronology is a problem here, as in all folk-tales, with some events being mentioned before the actual tale is told) Loki moves from being a mischievous trickster to something altogether more evil and vicious. His involvement in the Death of Balder leads to the final destruction of the Gods and Asgard in the tale known as Ragnarok.

Crossley-Holland tells these tales simply and directly, using the Norse sagas as his basis and while some of the poetry and elegance is inevitably lost in translation, the book is eminently readable and a great introduction to a mythology that was still believed in by certain parts of the world into the 13th Century.

Notes on the legends are grouped together at the back of the book, quite sensibly as this doesn't interrupt the flow of the stories and one can choose to read them or not, depending on your interest. ( )
1 vote David.Manns | Nov 28, 2016 |
Great introduction to Norse mythology. The myths are all short and quick so the book is very easy to get through. I must admit that I did not bother trying too hard on reading many of the names aloud. ( )
  Sareene | Oct 23, 2016 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Kevin Crossley-Hollandautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Firmin, HannahArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Lydbury, JaneIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Fearlessness is better than a faint-heart for any
man who puts his nose out of doors. The length of
my life and the day of my death were fated long ago.

Anonymous lines from For Scirnis
We make trifles of terrors, ensconcing ourselves
into seeming knowledge, when we should submit
ourselves to an unknown fear.

William Shakespeare
I think Scandinavian Paganism, to us here, is more interesting than any other. It is, for one thing, the latest; it continued in these regions of Europe till the eleventh century; 800 years ago the Norwegians were still worshippers of Odin. It is interesting also as the creed of our fathers; the men whose blood still runs in our veins, whom doubtless we still resemble in so many ways.

Thomas Carlyle
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for my mother
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[Acknowledgments] What we write is partly chosen for us, partly of our own choosing; and however rapidly it may be committed to paper, a book may be a very long time in the making.
[Introduction] The dramatic entry in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle for 793 reads:
In this year dire portents appeared over Northumbria and sorely frightened the people.
Burning ice, biting flame; that is how life began.
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The extraordinary Scandinavian myth cycle is one of the most enduring, exciting, dramatic and compelling of the world's great stories. A series of intertwined tales which together form a strange and fantastical world teeming with gods and goddesses, heroes and monsters, battles and couplings, the Norse myths are as exciting to read as they are of vast cultural and historical importance. Taking us from the creation of the world through the building of Asgard's Wall to the final end in Ragnorak, and featuring the exploits and adventures of such legendary figures as Odin, Thor and Loki, The Penguin Book of the Norse Mythsbrings alive the passion, cruelty and heroism of these unforgettable stories.

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