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Framley Parsonage (Oxford World's Classics)…
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Framley Parsonage (Oxford World's Classics) (original: 1861; edição: 2014)

de Anthony Trollope (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
1,617428,029 (4.02)5 / 277
"Framley Parsonage, " the fourth book in the Barchester series, was perhaps the book that finally sealed Anthony Trollope's reputation as a novelist of the first order. Mark Robarts is a clergyman with ambitions beyond his small country parish of Framley. In a naive attempt to mix in influential circles, he agrees to guarantee a bill for a large sum of money for the disreputable local Member of Parliament, while being helped in his career in the Church by the same hand. But the unscrupulous politician reneges on his financial obligations, and Mark must face the consequences this debt may bring to his family.… (mais)
Membro:MichaelDennis
Título:Framley Parsonage (Oxford World's Classics)
Autores:Anthony Trollope (Autor)
Informação:Oxford University Press (2014), Edition: Critical ed., 528 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca, Para ler
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

Framley Parsonage de Anthony Trollope (Author) (1861)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 42 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Yay! Back to my favorite characters from Barchester, the Proudies and the Grantlys! I also enjoyed learning more about Mr. Crawley and his family. Because Dr. Arabin's friendship with Mr. Crawley was originally alluded to in "Barchester Towers" it was also nice to see its backstory fleshed out. Unfortunately, Mr. Crawley and Dr. Arabin did not remain friends after Dr. Arabin got a promotion and became wealthy (as described in "Barchester Towers").

So now I want two things from the remaining books in the series: for Mrs. Proudie to get her comeuppance (unless Griselda Grantly's marquisal marriage actually going through is supposed to be just that) and for Mr. Crawley and Dr. Arabin to reconcile.

And the Duke of Omnium - oh my! A "fabricator of evil" and described more particularly, and deliciously, as "a Whig, he was a bachelor, he was a gambler, he was immoral in every way, he was a man of no church principle, a corrupter of youth, a sworn foe of young wives, a swallower up of small men's patrimonies; a man whom mothers feared for their sons, and sisters for their brothers; and worse again, whom fathers had cause to fear for their daughters, and brothers for their sisters;—a man who, with his belongings, dwelt, and must dwell, poles asunder from Lady Lufton and her belongings!"

And this, "But now all things were going wrong, and Lady Lufton would find herself in close contiguity to the nearest representative of Satanic agency, which, according to her ideas, was allowed to walk this nether English world of ours. Would she scream? or indignantly retreat out of the house?—or would she proudly raise her head, and with outstretched hand and audible voice, boldly defy the devil and all his works? In thinking of these things as the duke approached Miss Dunstable almost lost her presence of mind."

If I had a complaint it would be that most of the Parliamentary portions seemed somewhat out of place and could have been by and large omitted from the book with no damage to the story.

I love Trollope's characters - they seem so real and multifaceted, and for the most part they have understandable and reasonable motives for behaving the way they do. I can well believe what some have said about Trollope - that while he was always capable of remembering his characters were of his own invention, he could simultaneously see them as real people whose lives he had just happened to take an interest in.

Other good quotes:

"A burden that will crush a single pair of shoulders will, when equally divided—when shared by two, each of whom is willing to take the heavier part—become light as a feather. Is not that sharing of the mind's burdens one of the chief purposes for which a man wants a wife? For there is no folly so great as keeping one's sorrows hidden."

"Supplehouse was to be there, and Harold Smith, who now hated his enemy with a hatred surpassing that of women—or even of politicians."

And I learned a new word:

Rhadamanthine - showing stern and inflexible judgement.
( )
  Jennifer708 | Mar 23, 2020 |
Yay! Back to my favorite characters from Barchester, the Proudies and the Grantlys! I also enjoyed learning more about Mr. Crawley and his family. Because Dr. Arabin's friendship with Mr. Crawley was originally alluded to in "Barchester Towers" it was also nice to see its backstory fleshed out. Unfortunately, Mr. Crawley and Dr. Arabin did not remain friends after Dr. Arabin got a promotion and became wealthy (as described in "Barchester Towers").

So now I want two things from the remaining books in the series: for Mrs. Proudie to get her comeuppance (unless Griselda Grantly's marquisal marriage actually going through is supposed to be just that) and for Mr. Crawley and Dr. Arabin to reconcile.

And the Duke of Omnium - oh my! A "fabricator of evil" and described more particularly, and deliciously, as "a Whig, he was a bachelor, he was a gambler, he was immoral in every way, he was a man of no church principle, a corrupter of youth, a sworn foe of young wives, a swallower up of small men's patrimonies; a man whom mothers feared for their sons, and sisters for their brothers; and worse again, whom fathers had cause to fear for their daughters, and brothers for their sisters;—a man who, with his belongings, dwelt, and must dwell, poles asunder from Lady Lufton and her belongings!"

And this, "But now all things were going wrong, and Lady Lufton would find herself in close contiguity to the nearest representative of Satanic agency, which, according to her ideas, was allowed to walk this nether English world of ours. Would she scream? or indignantly retreat out of the house?—or would she proudly raise her head, and with outstretched hand and audible voice, boldly defy the devil and all his works? In thinking of these things as the duke approached Miss Dunstable almost lost her presence of mind."

If I had a complaint it would be that most of the Parliamentary portions seemed somewhat out of place and could have been by and large omitted from the book with no damage to the story.

I love Trollope's characters - they seem so real and multifaceted, and for the most part they have understandable and reasonable motives for behaving the way they do. I can well believe what some have said about Trollope - that while he was always capable of remembering his characters were of his own invention, he could simultaneously see them as real people whose lives he had just happened to take an interest in.

Other good quotes:

"A burden that will crush a single pair of shoulders will, when equally divided—when shared by two, each of whom is willing to take the heavier part—become light as a feather. Is not that sharing of the mind's burdens one of the chief purposes for which a man wants a wife? For there is no folly so great as keeping one's sorrows hidden."

"Supplehouse was to be there, and Harold Smith, who now hated his enemy with a hatred surpassing that of women—or even of politicians."

And I learned a new word:

Rhadamanthine - showing stern and inflexible judgement.
( )
  Jennifer708 | Mar 23, 2020 |
As usual Trollope's fourth novel in the Barsetshire Chronicle is laden with characters. One of the first people readers meet is Mark Robarts, a vicar with ambitions to further his career. The gist of the story is that Robarts loans Nathaniel Sowerby money even though Robarts realizes Sowerby is an unsavory character, always gambling and up to no good. Of course there is some good old fashioned courting of the ladies going on that complicates the story.
Trollope explores human emotions such as humiliation (Robarts not being able to afford to give a loan but does it anyway), romance (between Mark's sister, Lucy, and Lord Lufton), greed (inappropriate relationships because of lower class status) and affection (bailing a friend out of a sticky situation). The subplot of Lucy and Lord Lufton is my favorite. Lady Lufton doesn't think Lucy is good enough for her son (what mother does?). ( )
  SeriousGrace | Jul 29, 2019 |
Another lovely romance that follows similar lines to Doctor Thorne and also revisits some beloved characters from earlier in the Chronicles and marries them off beautifully too. I get a bit lost in all the politics and I'm not entirely sure what the Duke of Omnium is supposed to have done to earn so much opprobrium, but it all rattles along with good things happening to mostly good people and mostly bad people ending up with less, so who could possibly complain? Trollope's still a Jew-hating asshat, but everything else is delicious. ( )
  asxz | Mar 13, 2019 |
'Framley Parsonage' is not the continuation of the story of 'Doctor Thorne' the way that 'Barchester Towers' was of 'The Warden', but they have a good deal in common more than characters and setting.

Mark Robarts is a clergyman, not yet thirty, who has benefited from the patronage of his friend's mother, Lady Lufton. She chose him a devoted and capable wife and granted him the comfortable living of Framley at £800 a year. He lives perhaps too respectably, with a large household and a pony-chaise - things on the edge of propriety for a gentlemen of his standing and only just within his means. He has ambitions to move into even higher circles, even at the expense of his patroness' good opinion. With good intentions, he naively signs a note for dissolute politician Mr. Sowersby. The debt falls on Mark and he has to deal with the consequences towards not only his reputation but the happiness and security of his family. This conflict Mark's refusal to so anything at all about it makes up about a third of the novel, at least. It is frustrating and tedious. Thankfully, there are other people to follow.

Mark's sister, Lucy, comes to stay at the parsonage after the death of their father. She is a bright girl, but shy and without many of the higher refinements and accomplishments of other genteel women. Slowly, Lucy and young Lord Lufton form a mutual attachment. This further aggravates Lady Lufton, who would have her son marry a girl of her own choosing. Lucy, much like Mary Thorne in Doctor Thorne acts precisely within appropriate boundaries, but also speaks her mind and her conduct does much towards securing her own happiness. Lord Lufton, too, while not being entirely gallant, is not waiting on outside windfalls to accomplish his objectives, as Frank Gresham did. Trollope handles this conflict skillfully, one understands and sympathizes with Lady Lufton and her reasons in a way one couldn't Lady Arabella's. Arabella was a hostile hypocrite and the relationship of her and her family was incomprehensible outside the needs of the plot. In this novel Trollope got it right. The Luftons and the Robarts do argue and have fundamental disagreements, but they do so in a way that is compatible with their being friends and family.

The Robarts are acquainted with the Greshams, which brings the indomitable Miss Dunstable into play. She is still pursued by all manner of fortune-hunters, including Mr. Sowersby, but she is more than a match for them. Miss Dunstable persists in beating society at its own game. Her triumph was my favorite part of the novel. There are other subplots of course. The Grantlys, the Proudies, the Arabins and others all have their chance. Even the devious Mr. Sowersby and his shallow sister and his political friends have a chance to present themselves in a way that is understandable and entertaining. All of it adds to a richly layered novel about morality, convention, marriage and politics. Trollope has his characters act and behave in a way that is stylized and exaggerated enough for a novel, but still within the bounds of realism.

Next I go to 'The Small House at Allington' ( )
  ManWithAnAgenda | Feb 18, 2019 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (13 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Trollope, AnthonyAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Carter, PipNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Miles, PeterIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Mullin, KatherineIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
O'Gorman, FrancisIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Skilton, DavidIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Steed, MaggieNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Vance, SimonNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
West, TimothyNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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"Framley Parsonage, " the fourth book in the Barchester series, was perhaps the book that finally sealed Anthony Trollope's reputation as a novelist of the first order. Mark Robarts is a clergyman with ambitions beyond his small country parish of Framley. In a naive attempt to mix in influential circles, he agrees to guarantee a bill for a large sum of money for the disreputable local Member of Parliament, while being helped in his career in the Church by the same hand. But the unscrupulous politician reneges on his financial obligations, and Mark must face the consequences this debt may bring to his family.

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2 edições deste livro foram publicadas por Penguin Australia.

Edições: 0140432132, 0141199768

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