Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

The Medusa and the Snail de Lewis Thomas
Carregando...

The Medusa and the Snail (original: 1979; edição: 1979)

de Lewis Thomas

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
937716,536 (3.97)25
Lewis Thomas's fascinating observations of the quirkiness of the world's lifeforms cause the listener to ponder simultaneously a tiny organism and the workings of the cosmos. In one chapter he examines the medusa jellyfish and a sea slug, mutually parasitic and dependent on one another. Lewis says, "They remind me of the whole earth at once."… (mais)
Membro:tonypet
Título:The Medusa and the Snail
Autores:Lewis Thomas
Informação:Viking Adult (1979), Hardcover, 175 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher de Lewis Thomas (1979)

Adicionado recentemente porCliffisland, racergirl76, chaimkut, spicelib, tymyrick, bwa32
Bibliotecas HistóricasEdward St. John Gorey , Walker Percy
Nenhum(a)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 25 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 7 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
A rather scattered collection of essays, with no real connecting thread except "Lewis Thomas' thoughts". Not even biology, there's a few about astronomy and cosmology, some about basic (as opposed to applied) science, some about medicine (which is biology, sort of). One was weird and wonderful - it reminded me very much of (a long-time favorite) Italo Calvino's Cosmicomics. Same sort of science-based surreal fantasy - in this case, spinning the world around his pencil-point, and apologizing to the astronomers and the like who had to deal with this temporarily altered structure of the universe. Some of the later essays were making good points, about how what medicine really needs at this point (that point - written in the 80s) is not medical studies but basic science about the structure of bodies/cells/viruses/DNA/the brain/etc - and the surprises there will lead to real cures later on. However, I'd gotten so annoyed with him at that point that I was only reluctantly agreeing. In the essays earlier in the book, he repeatedly tossed off an assertion ("I see no reason why there should not be genes for usefulness"), then used that assertion as support for his argument in the next essay ("We have genes for usefulness, and that is as close as I can imagine as a goal for the world" (Gaia - world as organism - which is a pretty weird argument by itself without trying to find a purpose for it)). He also shows his medical background pretty heavily - when he mentions any medical matter, he gets very technical. Not pneumonia, not the pneumonia bacteria, but "pneumonicocci". I understood, more or less, but the precision there stood out against the vagueness of most of his statements, especially the linguistic ones. I need to remember that despite the fascinating subjects he says his books are about, I really don't like Lewis Thomas as a writer. Oh, and the story of the medusa (jellyfish) and the snail is, again, tossed off in a couple paragraphs. It's an interesting story of co-parasitism and symbiosis - but there's no _point_ to the story and nothing really known about it (do some of the jellyfish not get snails, and if so what happens to them? Do some of the snails not get in the jellyfish, and ditto? How does the symbiosis help either creature - what's the advantage? If you don't care about these questions, why write about the combination at all?). Bah. I think I'll get a Stephen Jay Gould for a table book for a while - I know his essays won't leave me hanging like this. ( )
1 vote jjmcgaffey | Dec 28, 2012 |
This is an interesting book to read. I enjoyed Lewis Thomas's essays, and I found them witty and informative. ( )
  robrod1 | Dec 18, 2012 |
This is a collection of essays from a marine biologist. Some of it was interesting, such as the Medusa and the Snail he discovered in a symbiotic relationship off the coast of Greece. Not really my cup of tea. ( )
  Diwanna | Aug 2, 2010 |
This is a collection of essays concerned with science, (mainly biology and medicine), and linguistics. The author is an expert in several areas, and writes in a very entertaining way about interesting things. The essays aren't that long, two to four pages mainly, but he discusses things rigorously, making observations that are not only valid today (the book was written 30 years ago), but acute or amusing too. The topics won't all be of interest to the layman, nor will they all be completely comprehensible to the average reader due to the odd specialised word, but someone not educated in science should be able to understand the majority of it. One of the best aspects of the book is how the authors expertise in science is mixed with literary and artistic appreciation and skill. So many science experts completely miss the point in scientific matters, as well as being dry and boring, whereas Thomas doesn't make either of these mistakes. I've become a fan, and I'm going to find some more of his books. ( )
5 vote P_S_Patrick | May 9, 2009 |
Quick, humorous, and profound read. Consists of multiple short essays that keep the book moving. Many ideas regarding the philosophical and societal implication of biology and medicine.
  develynlibrary | Dec 17, 2008 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 7 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For
Beryl,
with love
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
We've never been so self-conscious about our selves as we seem to be these days.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

Lewis Thomas's fascinating observations of the quirkiness of the world's lifeforms cause the listener to ponder simultaneously a tiny organism and the workings of the cosmos. In one chapter he examines the medusa jellyfish and a sea slug, mutually parasitic and dependent on one another. Lewis says, "They remind me of the whole earth at once."

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.97)
0.5
1
1.5
2 5
2.5 4
3 17
3.5 5
4 37
4.5 7
5 29

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 156,992,890 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível