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Ancillary Justice

de Ann Leckie

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

Séries: Imperial Radch (1)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
4,2742961,993 (4)1 / 523
Now isolated in a single frail human body, Breq, an artificial intelligence that used to control of a massive starship and its crew of soldiers, tries to adjust to her new humanity while seeking vengeance and answers to her questions.
Adicionado recentemente porbiblioteca privada, sarahlh, riddyk, Hellmarch, phildini, RJV2337, nelsonpray, yuguuk, flowerysong, wetdryvac
  1. 91
    The Left Hand of Darkness de Ursula K. Le Guin (lquilter)
    lquilter: Fans of either Le Guin's Left Hand of Darkness or Leckie's Ancillary Justice should enjoy the other. In common, the pacing, character-centered perspective obscuring aspects of the universe, political machinations, far-future setting, and treatment of ethics; also interesting for its simultaneous foregrounding and backgrounding of gender.… (mais)
  2. 40
    Ghost Spin de Chris Moriarty (libron)
    libron: Ancillary Justice is great - but for a nuanced, riveting treatment of AI, Moriarty has her beat, hands down. I hope to see more rigorous explorations in future of what Leckie has limned in her first outing.
  3. 40
    All Systems Red de Martha Wells (chlorine)
    chlorine: Main protagonists are at least somewhat AI, and both books have a neutral take on gender.
  4. 30
    Foreigner de C. J. Cherryh (sandstone78)
    sandstone78: Leckie has said that Cherryh's Foreigner books were a big influence on Ancillary Justice and sequels
  5. 30
    A Memory Called Empire de Arkady Martine (g33kgrrl)
    g33kgrrl: Both books feature complex, political space sci-fi with amazing characters and world-building.
  6. 41
    Embassytown de China Miéville (electronicmemory)
  7. 30
    Ring of Swords de Eleanor Arnason (libron)
    libron: Arnason's depiction of an alternative (alien) gender/social structure is awesome. I hope Leckie can flesh her own ideas out further beyond pronoun ambiguity in forthcoming books.
  8. 20
    A Matter of Oaths de Helen S. Wright (sandstone78)
    sandstone78: Some of the dynamics in Leckie's Ancillary Justice remind me of the much more obscure single-volume space opera Wright's A Matter of Oaths about two warring immortal emperors and a protagonist with a mysterious connection to them- if you like one, you may like the other.… (mais)
  9. 20
    Fool's War de Sarah Zettel (Dilara86)
    Dilara86: Sentient AIs and spaceships
  10. 20
    A Fire upon the Deep de Vernor Vinge (electronicmemory)
  11. 31
    The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet de Becky Chambers (souloftherose)
    souloftherose: Both are optimistic space operas that focus on the characters and their relationships.
  12. 20
    The Ship Who Sang de Anne McCaffrey (RidgewayGirl)
    RidgewayGirl: Utterly different in tone, this also features the "mind" of a ship and the people she interacts with.
  13. 00
    Hexwood de Diana Wynne Jones (CelestiaJK)
    CelestiaJK: Both have interesting AI themes and a great understanding of human nature.
  14. 00
    Worlds of Exile and Illusion: Three Complete Novels of the Hainish Series in One Volume--Rocannon's World; Planet of Exile; City of Illusions de Ursula K. Le Guin (sturlington)
  15. 00
    Ninefox Gambit de Yoon Ha Lee (souloftherose)
  16. 00
    Leviathan Wakes de James S. A. Corey (g33kgrrl)
  17. 00
    The Lazarus War: Artefact de Jamie Sawyer (dClauzel)
  18. 00
    Lock In de John Scalzi (sturlington)
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» Veja também 523 menções

Inglês (293)  Francês (1)  Holandês (1)  Todos os idiomas (295)
Mostrando 1-5 de 295 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
One of the more painful things i have read, and that includes much that hurt. very well worth it. Gains strength on the re-read, too. ( )
  wetdryvac | Mar 2, 2021 |
Full disclosure: I received a free review copy of this book from Net Galley.

Ancillary Justice is science fiction crammed full to the brim with wild ideas. The main character, Breq, is an “ancillary soldier” cut off from her ship for almost twenty years, but she isn’t exactly human, at least not by the standards of her society, the Radch. The Radch, it seems, were aggressive about expansion over thousands of years. As part of that expansion they captured entire civilizations and turned the leftover bodies into these ancillaries – soldiers that shared a mind with their ships, that were effectively as much a part of their ships as any piece of the hull. Corpse soldiers, to quote a slang term.

Breq, who comes from a ship called the Justice of Toren, has spent the past twenty years tirelessly working towards revenge against Anaander Mianaai, Lord of the Radch, who shares one similarity with Breq and other ancillaries: she has thousands of bodies under her control. This, naturally, complicates Breq’s plan for revenge. In the current day scenes, Breq searches for an artifact that will help her carry out her plans while also caring for a petulant drug-addicted former solider who once served on her ship. These alternate with flashbacks to Breq’s time spent as an ancillary soldier on the last planet annexed by the Radch.

Leckie does a great job of slowly revealing more and more about Breq’s past and the nature of the tragedy that befell her ship. She also takes fairly simple building blocks and turns them into fascinating philosophical mind-benders. What, after all, does it mean for Breq’s I to mean the ship Justice of Toren but also all the hundreds of ancillary soldiers in her hold? The narrative is simultaneously first-person and omniscient, jumping from place to place as the ship’s many perspectives build to a greater whole.

Leckie also sets up the Radch society as one that does not distinguish between the genders when speaking. In practice, this means that everyone in the book is ”she” regardless of gender. Further complicating matters for Breq is the fact that she has a hard time distinguishing gender traits when in other societies, and tends to use incorrectly gendered pronouns. At first I found this a bit confusing, but once I got used to it, I found myself not really worrying about the gender of characters. Leckie drops hints here and there as to the actual gender of certain characters, but in practice it doesn’t actually matter.

The scope of Ancillary Justice feels simultaneously personal and global; Breq’s actions are deeply rooted in events from her past, but the result of her fight against the Lord of the Radch could have far-reaching repercussions. The world-building is pitch-perfect, and never feels heavy-handed or overwhelming. As soon as I finished this book, I checked to see if Leckie has any plans to continue writing in this world, and she does – apparently this is the first book in a loose trilogy. That said, it feels like Breq’s quest is contained; the end does set up possible future stories, but I couldn’t begin to guess where else Leckie might take the world of the Radch. However, I find that exciting.

I think my favorite part of this book was the way that Leckie took so many truly alien elements and made them feel natural and believable. The characters are human, but a type of human thousands of years removed from our society, and changed in many strange ways. We don’t ever meet any non-human characters, but they lurk just at the edge of the story, menacing and dangerous.

I can’t wait for the next book in this series, and I’ll definitely be checking out Leckie’s short stories as soon as possible. ( )
  unsquare | Feb 16, 2021 |
It took about 70 pages for Ancillary Justice to start making any kind of sense to me, but by the time it did, I was hooked. I loved Justice of Toren, One Esk, and Breq as different characters who are also the same character. I loved how the narrative can make us care about people and also show us that they are deeply wrong, all while never preaching or being ham-fisted with morals. I especially loved the cultural differences between the Radch, other human cultures, and the few aliens we see—you get the sense that the author knows much more than she’s telling you, but also that Justice of Toren would be happy to show you all that she knows if it were possible to talk to her. I also loved the exploration of gender, class, culture, religion, and family through the lenses of different cultures—and there are points where, even though this is a far-future space empire very far removed from our own world, where you can intimately relate. There’s a sense of kinship, as well as obvious and intentional disconnects from what we (humanity) eventually become.

In short, I really loved it, but the time it took to start coming together really frustrated me. It is due to how interesting the first 70 pages were in their own right that I didn’t give up. I was invested in finding out where it went and how it ended up playing out. ( )
  acardon | Feb 5, 2021 |
Ancilary Justice è prima di tutto una riflessione sul potere e sulle sue contraddizioni, poi una riflessione sul concetto di identità e, infine il ritratto di un bellissimo personaggio: Breq, un frammento della coscienza di una grande astronave millenaria, la Justice di Toren, intrappolato in un unico corpo, dopo la distruzione del vascello in cui risiedeva il centro della sua mente (lascio al lettore il piacere di scoprire cosa siano questi corpi e cosa questi comportino). Chi ha causato la distruzione di Justice di Toren? Cosa sta succedendo veramente nel Grande impero Raadchai? Una vicenda ricca tanto di colpi di scena quanto di spunti di riflessione come solo un grande romanzo di fantascienza riesce ad essere.
( )
  JoeProtagoras | Jan 28, 2021 |
This book sucked me in and took all my attention until I had finished. It was a difficult book, mostly because of its unique concept but also because the narration isn't at all chronological. So it took a lot of attention to follow it, but I felt it deserved that attention. It was that good.

I don't want to say anything else about it because it feels anything at all might spoil the joy of figuring the concept out as you go. Suffice it to say it's morally and emotionally and philosophically complex. It's like Margaret Atwood meets Isaac Asimov. And the writing itself is beautiful. If you don't mind a challenge, you won't be sorry. ( )
  jennelikejennay | Dec 31, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 295 (seguinte | mostrar todas)

» Adicionar outros autores (18 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Ann Leckieautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Andoh, AdjoaNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Benshoff, KirkDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Harris, JohnArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Kempen, BernhardTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Nunez, BillyArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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Now isolated in a single frail human body, Breq, an artificial intelligence that used to control of a massive starship and its crew of soldiers, tries to adjust to her new humanity while seeking vengeance and answers to her questions.

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