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Dear Mr. Knightley (2013)

de Katherine Reay

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5374846,114 (3.67)15
When an anonymous benefactor offers to put Samantha Moore through school, with the stipulation that she write frequent letters to him on her progress, Sam finds safety in the letters as her program and her peers force her to confront her past.
  1. 00
    Harvey & Eck de Erin O'Brien (JenniferRobb)
    JenniferRobb: both are written with the characters communicating via letters
  2. 00
    Authentically, Izzy de Pepper Basham (Usuário anônimo)
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Mostrando 1-5 de 48 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Since reading Eligible I'm interested in these Austen adjacent novels. I found this one in a daily book email and reviews were very good.

I liked the style of a story told through letters and the basic plot was ok but several things -- almost everything in the last chapters of the book -- annoyed me so much that it diminished everything for me. ( )
  hmonkeyreads | Jan 25, 2024 |
If I had known this was a Christian romance novel, I probably would not have checked it out. Christian romance is really not my thing. The big Christian elements in this novel don't pop up until around halfway through the book. They are:

1. waiting until marriage to have sex
2. God helps those who help themselves
3. the forgiveness of certain trespasses

All three of these themes were explored in ways that made me cringe. The protagonist is rewarded for her abstinence (and it's pointed out that others are punished in various ways for having sex before marriage). Similarly, she is rewarded for hard work with tremendously (read: unbelievably) good luck bestowed on her by a nice Christian couple (where were the nice Christian couples when she was a child in the foster system suffering abuse?). And in the end, she forgives someone for something I found 100% unforgivable and super creepy.

Even putting the uncomfortable moralizing of this novel aside, I never bought the premise. Sam is writing letters to an anonymous benefactor about her life. Sure, ok, I'm with you so far. Then she starts including super intimate details about her personal life. About how her boyfriend kisses her and her lack of sexual experience. These are really not the things a graduate student should share to secure her grant funding. Again, super creepy.

I read this because my library system has a program called 10 to Try where you read books in certain categories. This was meant to fulfill the epistolary novel category. I should have re-read [b:The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society|39832183|The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society|Mary Ann Shaffer|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1529026760l/39832183._SY75_.jpg|2754161]. ( )
  LibrarianDest | Jan 3, 2024 |
Not sure how religion took over in the end. ( )
  cathy.lemann | Mar 21, 2023 |
A contemporary retelling of Daddy-Long-Legs. Samantha Moore is offered a grant to get a masters in journalism on the condition that she keep writing to her anonymous benefactor.

This was unexpectedly compelling and I finished the audiobook in a couple of days.I like stories about universities and making friends. I like literary quotations. I like the way epistolary letters require some reading between the lines -- Sam’s letters give the sense that she’s being fully open, but she’s still writing for a specific audience, and it’s plausible that there are details she omits, or wording she might use in real life (or in her head) but wouldn’t write to the man paying her tuition.

And I liked how, when certain things come to light, those are acknowledged as problematic and Sam is supported.

I just thought Sam should have been allowed to be angry about a few more things. I was irate on her behalf. It’s dawned on me that I’ve reacted to Sam like she’s a real person. My criticism, both the noteworthy ones and the smaller quibbles, are mainly about times when I think others are being unfair or they have misunderstood Sam or they should support her differently. I haven’t really thought about the book as a story.

One of my criticisms was about the way Sam is pushed into studying journalism. Yes, she does have a choice, but it felt coercive and I was annoyed that that aspect wasn't addressed further. (I remain unconvinced that journalism is inherently a better use of Sam’s talents or a more reliable path to employment)

There are various characters’ who see Sam’s tendency to quote as a sign she’s not being genuine or living in the real world, and while it’s believable that people might think so, I was annoyed that the book narrative seemed to agree with them. I understand having quotes just pop into one’s head. It’s just the way some people’s brains work! Admittedly I don’t quote at people the way Sam sometimes does, but neither have I had Sam's upbringing -- I think she has very understandable reasons for using the words which pop into her head as a shield or a coping mechanism.

I found my first copy of Pride and Prejudice on the 'L' when I was nine. I loved Austen's world. It was safe and I could breathe. By the time I looked up, the book was disintegrating from wear and I had barely registered two foster placement switches. My “inability to relate” caused a few headaches at the Department of Children and Family Services. And that’s never changed. ( )
  Herenya | Sep 24, 2022 |
I wasn’t expecting to be hit so squarely in the feels with this one. I don’t usually cry reading books but I cried twice. It tugged on my heartstrings. I felt like I was Sam Moore, I felt her every emotion, her struggles to connect, and her deep longing to be loved. I couldn’t be more thrilled to give this book 5/5 stars. If I could give it more stars I would. ( )
  natmo | Jun 1, 2022 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 48 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
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Katherine Reayautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Huber, HillaryNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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To Matthew, Elizabeth, and Mary Margaret--for your unfailing love and support. And to Mason--who gave me the idea in the first place.
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Dear sir, It has been a year since I turned down your generous offer.
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When an anonymous benefactor offers to put Samantha Moore through school, with the stipulation that she write frequent letters to him on her progress, Sam finds safety in the letters as her program and her peers force her to confront her past.

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Katherine Reay é um Autor LibraryThing, um autor que lista a sua biblioteca pessoal na LibraryThing.

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813.6Literature English (North America) American fiction 21st Century

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Média: (3.67)
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