Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

ZEALOT: The Life and Times of Jesus of…
Carregando...

ZEALOT: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth (original: 2013; edição: 2013)

de Reza Aslan (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
2,9961354,636 (3.88)2 / 164
Biography & Autobiography. Politics. Religion & Spirituality. Nonfiction. HTML:#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A lucid, intelligent page-turner (Los Angeles Times) that challenges long-held assumptions about Jesus, from the host of Believer
 
Two thousand years ago, an itinerant Jewish preacher walked across the Galilee, gathering followers to establish what he called the Kingdom of God. The revolutionary movement he launched was so threatening to the established order that he was executed as a state criminal. Within decades after his death, his followers would call him God.
 
Sifting through centuries of mythmaking, Reza Aslan sheds new light on one of historys most enigmatic figures by examining Jesus through the lens of the tumultuous era in which he lived. Balancing the Jesus of the Gospels against the historical sources, Aslan describes a man full of conviction and passion, yet rife with contradiction. He explores the reasons the early Christian church preferred to promulgate an image of Jesus as a peaceful spiritual teacher rather than a politically conscious revolutionary. And he grapples with the riddle of how Jesus understood himself, the mystery that is at the heart of all subsequent claims about his divinity.
 
Zealot yields a fresh perspective on one of the greatest stories ever told even as it affirms the radical and transformative nature of Jesus life and mission.
 
Praise for Zealot
 
Riveting . . . Aslan synthesizes Scripture and scholarship to create an original account.The New Yorker
 
Fascinatingly and convincingly drawn . . . Aslan may come as close as one can to respecting those who revere Jesus as the peace-loving, turn-the-other-cheek, true son of God depicted in modern Christianity, even as he knocks down that image.The Seattle Times
 
[Aslans] literary talent is as essential to the effect of Zealot as are his scholarly and journalistic chops. . . . A vivid, persuasive portrait.Salon
 
This tough-minded, deeply political book does full justice to the real Jesus, and honors him in the process.San Francisco Chronicle
 
A special and revealing work, one that believer and skeptic alike will find surprising, engaging, and original.Jon Meacham, Pulitzer Prizewinning author of Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power
 
Compulsively readable . . . This superb work is highly recommended.Publishers Weekly (starred review).
… (mais)
Membro:richjones
Título:ZEALOT: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth
Autores:Reza Aslan (Autor)
Informação:Random House (2013), Edition: Illustrated, 296 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Informações da Obra

Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth de Reza Aslan (2013)

Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Grupo TópicoMensagensÚltima Mensagem 
 Christianity: Zealot33 por ler / 33nathanielcampbell, Fevereiro 2014

» Veja também 164 menções

Inglês (134)  Alemão (1)  Todos os idiomas (135)
Mostrando 1-5 de 135 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Probably a fairly accurate description of how Christianity got started. Didn't really do much for me one way or the other. ( )
  Abcdarian | May 18, 2024 |
Fascinating. ( )
  autumndragyn | Nov 23, 2023 |
A very interesting, surprisingly fast read, Aslan presents an incredibly concise yet readable synthesis of his original research. My knowledge of this period in history was deepened and extended, a few misconceptions picked up in high school and that had crept in from common culture were corrected, which is no small matter to be grateful for. It was fascinating to learn about the historical Jesus through what is known about how the people of Nazareth lived at the time and the complex political relationship between Rome and the tolerated, multi-faceted and conflicted Jewish society in the surrounding area.

I struggled over whether or not to give this book a 3 or a 4, just because I got a bit confused with some time frames and background context until the second part of the book. But, the illuminating juxtaposition of biblical passages and historical facts about society at that time bumped it up for me. ( )
  lschiff | Sep 24, 2023 |
Reza Aslan claims early in this book that the sacrifices in the first century Temple in Jerusalem smelled horrible. It turns out that animal sacrifice - which was practiced by most of the ancient religions and was not one of the things about ancient Judaism that seemed strange to pagans - always was meant to smell good. There would be the smell of cooked meat and when it burned, heavy incense was added to ensure that the smoke smelled good. After all, it was meant for God to enjoy, and one does not send stinky smoke to God.

Much of what Aslan says is just plain factually wrong. As R.B. Sheridan said: 1CThe honorable gentleman relies upon his imagination for his facts. 1D The book 19s Introduction starts with Jesus of Nazareth 19s arrival in first century Palestine: 1CThe itinerant preacher wandering from village to village clamoring about the end of the world 26 was a common sight in Jesus 19s time 26. 1D And 1Ccountless prophets, preachers, and messiahs tramped through the Holy Land delivering messages of God 19s imminent judgment. 1D

Aslan says that the sight of these itinerant preachers was so common 1Cthat it had become a kind of caricature among the Roman elite. In a farcical passage about just such a figure, the Greek philosopher Celsus imagines a Jewish holy man roaming the Galilean countryside, shouting to no one in particular: 18I am God, or the servant of God, or a divine spirit. But I am coming, for the world is already in the throes of destruction. And you will soon see me coming with the power of heaven 19. 1D

This passage fails to support the contention that first century 1CRoman elites 1D were contemptuous of messianism because it quotes a the late second century Greek named Celsus who lived well after Christianity had become a wide-spread and influential movement. Celsus while given to attacking Christianity in particular, was in this instance attacking all prophet-types and not necessarily Jewish ones and certainly not specifically Galileans! Trying to imply that Celsus was a sort of contemporary of Jesus rather than someone who knew of (and hotly opposed) the Christian faith as it was constituted in the second century after Jesus is plain intellectual dishonesty on the author 19s part. The material in Aslan 19s quotation marks was not actually a quote from Celsus; rather it is more of Aslan 19s creative writing, as if to say: this is sort of what Celsus said.

Aslan 19s contention that the kind of claim for divinity that was made on Jesus 19s behalf by his followers during the century after his crucifixion was commonplace in Jesus 19s time and place is untrue. Aslan is trying to muddy the waters by suggesting that others within the Jewish tradition made such claims of divinity for themselves. No, they often claimed messiahship and/or prophethood, but identification with God, no.

One doesn 19t get far into this book without finding other problems. Aslan says that Josephus 19s phrase 1Cthe one they call messiah 1D was 1Cclearly meant to express derision 1D except that not all scholars would agree that this is 1Cclear 1D; in fact, Aslan contradicts himself by suggesting that 1Ca specific appellation 1D was simply necessary in the context so that Josephus 19s readers would know whom he was talking about.

The meaning of 1Cmessiah 1D was originally that of a king chosen by God, like David who is always the model of the Messiah. (The gospels of Matthew and Luke take pains to link Jesus to David genealogically.) But the term 1Cmessiah 1D has gotten stretched to mean many different things from earthly king to spiritual leader/priest to only begotten son of God. Aslan does not let his readers understand this range of meaning so much as he confuses these different meanings.

Add to dishonesty the author 19s scholarly sloppiness, for example, in saying that the word 1Cgospel 1D is 1CGreek for 18good news 19. 1D Actually, 1Cgospel 1D is ENGLISH for 1Cgood news 1D (a wonderful example of how speakers of Old English translated Christian terms into Anglo-Saxon ones). The Greek for 1Cgood news 1D is 1CEuangelion, 1D which is the basis of the English word 1Cevangelist. 1D

Unlike other critics of Aslan, who come from more of a position of Christian apologetics, I have less disagreement with many the author 19s specific contentions such as that Jesus probably did not consider himself to be God and that he had what might be called a radical agenda, but I think that Aslan 19s notion that Jesus was a zealot or violent revolutionary does not fit the historical record. Rather, like most scholars and laymen who have studied Jesus over the past two thousand years, Aslan has remade Jesus in Aslan 19s own image. To understand Aslan 19s Jesus, one must look to Aslan 19s relationship with Islam (renewed) in general and jihad in particular. He has made it a theme of his work to downplay the role of violent jihad in Islam, but in this book he suggests that an analogue to violent jihad can be seen in first century Palestine and Jesus can be seen as one of its advocates.

Aslan seems not to be up on the latest research. He goes along with the myth, recently debunked by Prof. Bart Ehrman, that 1Cpseudepigrapha 1D or writings that are attributed to someone who was not the real author are not to be considered forgeries and that the practice was an accepted convention in ancient times. Ehrman has shown that falsely attributed works were always considered 1Cbastards 1D if it could be proven that they were not really authored by the name on the title page, and argues persuasively that the point of the pseudepigraphical writings in the New Testament was precisely to fool readers into thinking that the real author 19s views were endorsed by the putative author. (For example, the epistles attributed to Peter were obviously written by two different authors with conflicting points of view.) Indeed, contrary to Aslan 19s subsequent claim that crucifixion was reserved for crimes against the state, crucifixion could sometimes be the punishment for other crimes including forgery 14a crime that must have been recognized to have deserved such an extreme punishment.

Much of what Aslan has to say, though he has his own spin and admits that other scholars would disagree with this or that argument he makes, has already been said, and said much more carefully and credibly, by other scholars such as Ehrman (who actually does have a doctorate in New Testament studies instead of just claiming to have one). The difference seems to be that Ehrman only has to make his case fit his reconstruction of history as it was, while Aslan must make history fit not only the past but the present history of the Middle East, as Aslan sees it, through present day ideological spectacles. ( )
  MilesFowler | Jul 16, 2023 |
This book provides a fresh perspective on one of the greatest stories ever told: Jesus, within the context of the times in which he lived.
  MenoraChurch | Apr 27, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 135 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
There is a sense in which each "biographer" of Jesus of Nazareth is like my young son: once I finish the work then I will know what the subject looks like. Reza Aslan is no different. He is an Iranian-American writer and scholar of religions and is a contributing editor for The Daily Beast. He is best known as the author of No God but God: The Origin, Evolution, and Future of Islam, which has been translated into thirteen languages and named by Blackwell as one of the 100 most important books of the last decade. His new book is Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth. In a recent interview with The Nation Aslan is asked, Your Jesus is "the man who defied the will of the most powerful empire the world had ever known--and lost." Sounds a bit like Bradley Manning.He answers:



I think you could make a lot of comparisons in that regard. The historical Jesus took on the powers that be on behalf of the poor and the dispossessed, the outcast and the marginalized; he sacrificed himself for a group that most Romans--and the Jewish elite--didn't consider to be real people, much less people worthy of salvation.



Most of his approach is evident in that answer. Jesus, he argues, was outcast and marginalized, probably illiterate, and filled with zeal for the Jewish religion he was born into. He reminds us that the gospels were written after 70 CE, an important date because that is when the Romans returned and destroyed Jerusalem, burning the temple to the ground. The Romans slaughtered thousands of Jews, exiled the rest, and made Judaism a "pariah religion". [Read the interview here.]
adicionado por delan | editarmetapsychology, Bob Lane (Sep 23, 2013)
 
Zealot reflects wide reading in the secondary literature that has emerged in the scholarly study of the historical Jesus. In that sense, as one colleague of mine puts it, Aslan is a reader rather than a researcher. Aslan’s reconstruction of the life of Jesus invests a surprisingly literalist faith in some parts of the gospel narratives. For example, he argues, against the scholarly consensus, that the so-called “messianic secret” in the Gospel of Mark (a text written four decades after the death of Jesus) reflects an actual political strategy of the historical Jesus rather than a literary device by which the author of that text made sense of conflicting bits of received tradition. His readings of the canonical gospels give little attention to the fact that the writers of these texts were engaged in a complex intertextual practice with the Hebrew scriptures in Greek, that these writers were interested in demonstrating that Jesus fulfilled prophecies written centuries earlier—in short, that the gospel writers were writers with (sometimes modest, sometimes expansive) literary aspirations and particular theological axes to grind. Biblical scholars have, over many decades, sought to develop methods of textual analysis to tease out these various interests and threads.

But Aslan does not claim to be engaged in literary analysis but in history-writing. One might then expect his reconstruction of the world of Jesus of Nazareth to display a deep understanding of second-temple Judaism. Yet, his historical reconstruction is partial in both senses of the term.
...
Simply put, Zealot does not break new ground in the history of early Christianity. It isn’t clear that any book framed as a “the life and times of Jesus of Nazareth” could, in fact, do so. Indeed, if it had not been thrust into the limelight by an aggressive marketing plan, the painfully offensive Fox News interview, and Aslan’s own considerable gifts for self-promotion, Zealot would likely have simply been shelved next to myriad other examples of its genre, and everyone could get back to their lives. As it is, the whole spectacle has been painful to watch. And as it is with so many spectacles, perhaps the best advice one might take is this: Nothing to see here, people. Move along.
adicionado por jimroberts | editarThe Nation, Elizabeth Castelli (Aug 9, 2013)
 
Zealot likewise fits the temper of our times neatly -- too neatly. Aslan's controversial Fox News interview, about whether his Islamic background allows him to write an objective historical account of Jesus, obscures the real problem: the hubris of the professional provocateur.

Aslan has advanced his career -- he is a professor of creative writing, not a historian -- with self-serving criticism of the "demonization" of Islam under the Bush administration. Having fled Iran in 1979 for the United States, he interprets the 9/11 attacks as a clarion call to Muslims in the Middle East to overthrow oppressive regimes. Thus, the Arab Spring is seen as the happy fruit of that horrific event: an unequivocal march toward political freedom. "Across the board," he told Mother Jones, "what has happened is that the regimes in the region now understand that they can no longer just ignore the will of the people." (Aslan has less to say about the pernicious influence of radical Islamist jihad in directing the "will of the people" in Egypt, Syria, Libya and beyond.)
adicionado por jimroberts | editarHuffington Post, Joseph Loconte (Aug 6, 2013)
 
“Zealot” shares some of the best traits of popular writing on scholarly subjects: it moves at a good pace; it explains complicated issues as simply as possible; it even provides notes for checking its claims.

But the book also suffers from common problems in popularization, like proposing outdated and simplistic theories for phenomena now seen as more complex. Mr. Aslan depicts earliest Christianity as surviving in two streams after Jesus: a Hellenistic movement headed by Paul, and a Jewish version headed by James. This dualism repeats 19th-century German scholarship. Nowadays, most scholars believe that the Christian movement was much more diverse, even from its very beginnings.

Mr. Aslan also proposes outdated views when he insists that the idea of a “divine messiah” or a “god-man” would have been “anathema” to the Judaism of the time, or when he writes that it would have been “almost unthinkable” for a 30-year-old Jewish man to be unmarried. Studies of the past few decades — including “King and Messiah as Son of God” (Adela Yarbro Collins and John J. Collins) and my own “Sex and the Single Savior: Gender and Sexuality in Biblical Interpretation” — have overturned these once commonplace assumptions.

There are several other errors, though most are minor.
 
Scholars and believers alike tend to contrast sharply the founders of Christianity and Islam: Jesus the apolitical man of peace who turns the other cheek; and Muhammad the politician, jurist and general who takes much of the Arabian Peninsula by force. In “Zealot,” Reza Aslan blurs this distinction, depicting Jesus as a “politically conscious Jewish revolutionary” whose kingdom is decidedly of this world.
...

In short, Jesus was a frustrated Muhammad — a man who, like Islam’s founder, came to revolutionize the world by force yet, unlike Muhammad, failed. This makes for a good read. It might even make for a good movie. Just don’t tell me it’s true.
 

» Adicionar outros autores (14 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Reza Aslanautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Bordwin, GabrielleDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Burokas, Mariusautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Cima da Conegliano, Giovanni BattistaArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Conegliano, GiovanniArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Cunningham, CarolineDesignerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Dedekind, Henningautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Eklöf, MargaretaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
黃煜文Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Fezehai, MalinAuthor photoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Fiszbein Brandenburg, María RosaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Fizsbein, Vardaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Galli, S.Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Greco, ElArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Hartman Maestro, LauraMapsautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Juraschitz, Norbertautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Lappalainen, Ottoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Maestro, Laura HartmanIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Nunn, JamesDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Pfeiffer, Thomasautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Reggiani, S.Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Schuler, Karinautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Suano, MarleneTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Taiuti, L.Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Do not think that I have come to bring peace on earth. I have not come to bring peace, but the sword.
Matthew 10:34
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For my wife, Jessica Jackley, and the entire Jackley clan,

whose love and acceptance have taught me more about Jesus

than all my years of research and study.
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Author's Note: When I was fifteen years old, I found Jesus.

Introduction: It is a miracle that we know anything at all about the man called Jesus of Nazareth.

Prologue: The war with Rome begins not with a clang of swords but with the lick of a dagger drawn from an assassin's cloak.

Chapter One: Who killed Jonathan son of Ananus as he strode across the Temple Mount in the year 56 C.E.?
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Today, I can confidently say that two decades of rigorous academic research into the origins of Christianity has made me a more genuinely committed disciple of Jesus of Nazareth than I ever was of Jesus Christ.
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico
LCC Canônico
Biography & Autobiography. Politics. Religion & Spirituality. Nonfiction. HTML:#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A lucid, intelligent page-turner (Los Angeles Times) that challenges long-held assumptions about Jesus, from the host of Believer
 
Two thousand years ago, an itinerant Jewish preacher walked across the Galilee, gathering followers to establish what he called the Kingdom of God. The revolutionary movement he launched was so threatening to the established order that he was executed as a state criminal. Within decades after his death, his followers would call him God.
 
Sifting through centuries of mythmaking, Reza Aslan sheds new light on one of historys most enigmatic figures by examining Jesus through the lens of the tumultuous era in which he lived. Balancing the Jesus of the Gospels against the historical sources, Aslan describes a man full of conviction and passion, yet rife with contradiction. He explores the reasons the early Christian church preferred to promulgate an image of Jesus as a peaceful spiritual teacher rather than a politically conscious revolutionary. And he grapples with the riddle of how Jesus understood himself, the mystery that is at the heart of all subsequent claims about his divinity.
 
Zealot yields a fresh perspective on one of the greatest stories ever told even as it affirms the radical and transformative nature of Jesus life and mission.
 
Praise for Zealot
 
Riveting . . . Aslan synthesizes Scripture and scholarship to create an original account.The New Yorker
 
Fascinatingly and convincingly drawn . . . Aslan may come as close as one can to respecting those who revere Jesus as the peace-loving, turn-the-other-cheek, true son of God depicted in modern Christianity, even as he knocks down that image.The Seattle Times
 
[Aslans] literary talent is as essential to the effect of Zealot as are his scholarly and journalistic chops. . . . A vivid, persuasive portrait.Salon
 
This tough-minded, deeply political book does full justice to the real Jesus, and honors him in the process.San Francisco Chronicle
 
A special and revealing work, one that believer and skeptic alike will find surprising, engaging, and original.Jon Meacham, Pulitzer Prizewinning author of Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power
 
Compulsively readable . . . This superb work is highly recommended.Publishers Weekly (starred review).

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Revisores inicias do LibraryThing

O livro de Reza Aslan, Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth, estava disponível em LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (3.88)
0.5
1 12
1.5
2 28
2.5 5
3 110
3.5 32
4 293
4.5 25
5 137

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 206,038,929 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível