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1914. De la paz a la guerra de Margaret…
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1914. De la paz a la guerra (edição: 2014)

de Margaret MacMillan, José Adrián Vitier (Tradutor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
9163317,108 (4.24)100
Presents a narrative portrait of Europe in the years leading up to World War I that illuminates the political, cultural, and economic factors and contributing personalities that shaped major events.
Membro:raperper
Título:1914. De la paz a la guerra
Autores:Margaret MacMillan
Outros autores:José Adrián Vitier (Tradutor)
Informação:Turner (2014), Kindle Edition, 864 páginas
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:History, Politics, 2014

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The War That Ended Peace: The Road to 1914 de Margaret MacMillan

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Mostrando 1-5 de 33 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
A very interesting read with a ton of information. At times, though, it felt like a Wikipedia expedition, i.e. clicking around and getting distracted often. The narrative flow never really captured me, but I did feel compelled to finish it. I’m looking forward to seeing her other book on the same subject, Paris 1919. I’ve heard excellent reviews of that book. ( )
  drew_asson | Dec 3, 2020 |
The book starts out by saying that the causes of the great war, which we now call World War one have been and will continue to be debated by historians. Some of us view it in a much simpler light. To us the cause of the war is easily stated in more general terms. Pride, and greed stood out clearly as I read the book as causes of this war.

It is an amazing portrait of the bluffing, misreading of character, disagreements, deception and misunderstanding of events that led to the start of the war. I was also amazed at the number of European squabbles in the decade (and a half) that this book covers.

Margaret MacMillan continually emphasized that so called ‘defensive alliances’ are perceived by others as threats, and thus increased the likelihood of war. The cross-linked alliances made it so that when any went to war others would be dragged in.

In the summer of 1914, by design or accident, or hubris, many of the principal parties were out as the Serbia vs Austria-Hungarian crisis escalated. Germany jammed radio communications between Paris and the yacht.

This is a very Euro-centric history. The Otoman empire was often mentioned, but there was nothing about them expect for European desires to snatch their lands as the Otoman empire had become weak. All of the history in this book comes from the perspective of the European states, mostly England, Germany, France, and Russia.

I kept calling this book “Prelude to War”, because it covered from the Paris exposition of 1900 to 1914, when mobilization started. I will strive to remember the correct name of the book. ( )
  bread2u | Jul 1, 2020 |
The War That Ended The Peace:The Road to 1914 by Margaret MacMillan is the history that lead to the first world war and started the twentieth century. MacMillan originally from Toronto, Canada is a historian and professor at Oxford University, where she also earned her PhD. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, an Honorary Fellow at St. Anthony’s College, and Senior Fellow At Massey College. She is the author of several book including: Nixon and Mao: The Week that Changed the World, The Uses and Abuses of History, and Women of the Raj.

World War I is the beginning of the twentieth century. It is the starting point of everything the twentieth century became; all the major events can be traced back to it: WWII, Communism, mechanized warfare, air power, arms races, and a bipolar world. People always ask what started the war? A Serbian radical? Alliances? MacMillan poses a different question: What ended the Peace? Europe was enjoying a time of prosperity, growth, and most importantly peace. Why would war break out?

Two issues of the many brought out in the book struck me as something I never put much thought in to before. First, the issue of defensive alliances. Entangling alliances is often cited as a reason for the war. France had a secret alliance with Russia to respond if either was attacked. Germany and Austria-Hungary had the same type of treaty. England enjoyed Splendid Isolation, playing the role of a balancing power in the alliance game. Alliances did drag all the players into war. Like dominoes knocking dominoes over, they all fell. It was not so much alliances that caused the problem as MacMillan points out. NATO helped keep the peace for for almost half a century. It was the players more so than the alliances. NATO was not worried that Italy would unilaterally act and attack Czechoslovakia and likewise there was no fear in the Warsaw Pact that East Germany would unilaterally attack West Germany. The players were responsible. The West under pressure to keep peace by democratically elected governments and the East from, perhaps, the recognition that war would only hurt. The players were not as responsible in 1914; responsible defensive alliances work.

Secondly, one of the key points of the modern Liberal Theory of international relations is that increased trade creates strong alliances: trading partners do not go to war against each other. Increased trade does seem to create prosperity. Before the start of the war prosperity was growing inside the great powers. Trade between Germany and England more than doubled in the pre-war years. Trade, however, did little to prevent war in Europe.

The War That Ended the Peace is an extremely detailed study of the years leading to the Great War. MacMillan does an excellent job detailing the events and the people. Her work is very well documented. The book will take the reader down the road that started with the promise of the 1900 Paris Exposition and the ends with war and how that seemed impossible. A must read for any WWI historian. MacMillan really examines the important question, not what started the war, but rather what ended the peace. ( )
  evil_cyclist | Mar 16, 2020 |
Excellent review of the path to WWI. More to come as I binge on books about this period of incredibly poor and deadly stewardship by Europe's masters. Interesting note: JFK was inspired to reject the aggressive advice of his generals during the Cuban Missile Crisis by his reading of Barbara Tuchman's [b: The Guns of August|11366|The Guns of August|Barbara W. Tuchman|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1431760956s/11366.jpg|1884932] about the start of the Great War. ( )
  Robert_Musil | Dec 15, 2019 |
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There have been as many plagues as wars in history; yet always wars and plagues take people equally by surprise. - Albert Camus, The Plague
Nothing that ever happened, nothing that was ever even willed, planned or envisaged, could seem irrelevant. War is not an accident: it is an outcome. One cannot look back too far to ask, of what? - Elizabeth Bowen, Bowen's Court
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To my mother, Eluned MacMillan
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On April 14, 1900, Emile Loubet, the President of France, talked approvingly about justice and human kindness as he opened the Paris Universal Exposition.
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Presents a narrative portrait of Europe in the years leading up to World War I that illuminates the political, cultural, and economic factors and contributing personalities that shaped major events.

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