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What Einstein Told His Barber

de Robert Wolke

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MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
5221446,985 (3.55)5
Science. Nonfiction. Humor (Nonfiction.) What makes ice cubes cloudy? How do shark attacks make airplanes safer? Can a person traveling in a car at the speed of sound still hear the radio? Moreover, would they want to. . . ?Do you often find yourself pondering life's little conundrums? Have you ever wondered why the ocean is blue? Or why birds don't get electrocuted when perching on high-voltage power lines? Robert L. Wolke, a professor emeritus of chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh and acclaimed author of What Einstein Didn't Know, understands the need to . . . well, understand. Now he provides more amusing explanations of such everyday phenomena as gravity (If you're in a falling elevator, will jumping at the last instant save your life?) and acoustics (Why does a whip make such a loud cracking noise?), along with amazing facts, belly-up-to-the-bar bets, and mind-blowing reality bites all with his trademark wit and wisdom.If you shoot a bullet into the air, can it kill somebody when it comes down? You can find out about all this and more in an astonishing compendium of the proverbial mind-boggling mysteries of the physical world we inhabit.Arranged in a question-and-answer format, What Einstein Told His Barber is for anyone who ever pondered such things as why colors fade in sunlight, what happens to the rubber from worn-out tires, what makes red-hot objects glow red, and other scientific curiosities.… (mais)
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    A Short History of Nearly Everything de Bill Bryson (Sandydog1)
    Sandydog1: Much more historical and comprehensive and much better-written.
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» Veja também 5 menções

Inglês (12)  Espanhol (1)  Francês (1)  Todos os idiomas (14)
Mostrando 1-5 de 14 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Un buen libro para saber un poco más de cosas cotidianas, contado de forma amena e incluso divertida. Los gags de humor son muy entretenidos. ( )
  EstanisGM | Apr 16, 2023 |
To anyone who's delaying the reading this book because of the fear that it might be too complex, too "Einsteinian", don't worry about it. On the contrary, "What Einstein Told His Barber" is nothing more than a series of short, east to comprehend discussions and explanations of things we all experience in our world everyday. (See the book jacket for examples of items discussed by the author). Some items may be familiar to the reader, other items may clarify some long since forgotten points learned in high school physics class, some will correct those age-old (and erroneous) commonly held beliefs, and others will simply be new ways of looking at things never before considered. It's all presented in a mildly amusing, simple to understand, layman's terms, and all-in-all, an interesting read on a rainy day.
( )
  rsutto22 | Jul 15, 2021 |
It's a fun read with good language. And, some parts of it are truly interesting. The reason why it gets only 2 stars is it has many mistakes here and there. For instance, the speed of light being told as 3 million kilometer per second everywhere was really bugging me throughout the book. There were many similar mistakes for values written in the metric system. Other than that the book was fine. ( )
  pinaki.s | Jul 12, 2021 |
don't get this in e-audio format, you'll be frustrated that you can't skip over all the stuff you already know/don't care about. ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
Explicaciones científicas a dudas del día a día sobre cómo son las cosas y por qué suceden. Libro para releer, consultar y utilizar como propuesta de lecturas concretas. ( )
  Luarnafraga | May 10, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 14 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
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» Adicionar outros autores (2 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Robert Wolkeautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Lanza, LorenzaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Ramonet, JulienTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Reuter, HelmutTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Vicentini, PatriziaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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Science. Nonfiction. Humor (Nonfiction.) What makes ice cubes cloudy? How do shark attacks make airplanes safer? Can a person traveling in a car at the speed of sound still hear the radio? Moreover, would they want to. . . ?Do you often find yourself pondering life's little conundrums? Have you ever wondered why the ocean is blue? Or why birds don't get electrocuted when perching on high-voltage power lines? Robert L. Wolke, a professor emeritus of chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh and acclaimed author of What Einstein Didn't Know, understands the need to . . . well, understand. Now he provides more amusing explanations of such everyday phenomena as gravity (If you're in a falling elevator, will jumping at the last instant save your life?) and acoustics (Why does a whip make such a loud cracking noise?), along with amazing facts, belly-up-to-the-bar bets, and mind-blowing reality bites all with his trademark wit and wisdom.If you shoot a bullet into the air, can it kill somebody when it comes down? You can find out about all this and more in an astonishing compendium of the proverbial mind-boggling mysteries of the physical world we inhabit.Arranged in a question-and-answer format, What Einstein Told His Barber is for anyone who ever pondered such things as why colors fade in sunlight, what happens to the rubber from worn-out tires, what makes red-hot objects glow red, and other scientific curiosities.

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500Natural sciences and mathematics General Science General Science

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