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Salmon Fishing in the Yemen de Paul Torday
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Salmon Fishing in the Yemen (original: 2007; edição: 2008)

de Paul Torday (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,429729,527 (3.56)118
This is the story of Dr Alfred Jones, a fisheries scientist--for whom diary notable events include the acquisition of a new electric toothbrush and getting his article on caddis fly larvae published in "Trout and Salmon"--who finds himself reluctantly involved in a project to bring salmon fishing to the Highlands of the Yemen, a project that will change his life, and the course of British political history forever. With a wickedly wonderful cast of characters--including a visionary Sheikh, a weasely spin doctor, Fred's devilish wife and a few thousand transplanted salmon--"Salmon fishing in the Yemen" is a novel about hypocrisy and bureaucracy, dreams and deniability, and the transforming power of faith and love.… (mais)
Membro:MarkRSpear
Título:Salmon Fishing in the Yemen
Autores:Paul Torday (Autor)
Informação:Mariner Books (2008), Edition: First, 352 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Salmon Fishing in the Yemen de Paul Torday (2007)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 72 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
This was a recommendation from my mum as I had asked for some "light reading". I ended up enjoying it a lot more than I expected. Had honestly thought it was going to be some kind of romance, but instead I got a gentle comedy told through correspondence and interviews. I liked the format and enjoyed the story. Won't read it again but might watch the film. It was sweet. ( )
  RFellows | Apr 29, 2020 |
“Even if only one hundred fish run, if only one fish is ever caught, think what we will have achieved. Some men in my position, with great wealth and freedom to spend as they like, have built mosques. Some have built hospitals or schools. I, too, have built hospitals and schools and mosques. What difference does one more mosque or one more hospital make? I can worship God outside my tent on the sands as well as in a mosque. I want to present God with the opportunity to perform a miracle, a miracle that he will perform if he so wills it. Not you, not Dr. Alfred, not all the clever engineers and scientist we have employed. You and they have prepared the way, but whatever happens will be God’s will. You will have been present at the delivery of the miracle and you will have been of great assistance too me, but the miracle is God’s alone. When anyone sees a salmon swimming up the waters of the Wadi Aleyn, will they any longer be able to doubt the existence of God?” p196

When Dr. Alfred Jones of the British Department of Fisheries is approached by a Yemeni Sheikh about introducing salmon into the deserts of Yemen, he can do nothing but laugh it off as a joke.

But to the sheikh who wants it, it isn’t a joke. It's an opportunity to create a miracle, as well as introducing a sport that rich and poor, Muslim and Jew can enjoy together.

Dr Jones begins a serious engineering task to undertake the project.

The results are quite unexpected.

This epistolary novel has laughter, relationships, and a serious look at attempting the impossible. I found it strangely uplifting. It is one to read if you’re looking for something lighter yet inspirational in this time of trouble. ( )
  streamsong | Apr 20, 2020 |
A good story about the unrealistic project of creating a salon river in the desert country of Yemen.

Some good characters in here, from Arthur the fish scientist, the sheikh , Harriet, and the vile political types. The sheikh has a calm authority and a strong faith and believes that this project will bring the joy of salmon fishing to his country.

The project has support from the politicians and then doesn't, all of which adds to the drama that steadily builds. That with the sub plots of Arthur and Harriet means an emotional roller coaster on the way to the completion of the project.

Enjoyed this, and will be reading more of his books. ( )
  PDCRead | Apr 6, 2020 |
I read this after watching the movie (https://www.librarything.com/work/13014294). I confess I liked the movie better, but the story was still interesting. Not sorry I read it. The concept of building a place for salmon fishing in Yemen is a hilarious idea that draws people in when convinced by the Sheikh that it is important to believe in something. I am just unhappy about the ending of the book and the characters that were emphasized. I thought the movie characters were better. ( )
  krazy4katz | Jul 8, 2019 |
This was a book club selection and therefore a new author to me and I wasn’t disappointed! The first thing that I was drawn to with this book was the name of the book. The idea of Salmon Fishing in the Yemen was interesting and intriguing at the same time. I wasn’t really sure what to expect so I was excited to find out.

The book started off by introducing us to a Dr Alfred Jones who worked for the National Centre for Fisheries Excellence (NCFE) through the correspondence he had with the director of NCFE David Sugden and others. We also meet Alfred’s (Fred’s) wife Mary who is hard to read at the best of times and at others seems to really lack any ounce of humour. We see that her relationship with Fred deteriorates over the course of the story. Personally I was never enamoured with Mary but thought that Fred was an interesting character - an honest man yet sensible.

The story showcased how politics is very good at covering up things so as to save face when things look as though they’re about to go horribly wrong and therefore needs to be standing an appropriate distance from goings on. Conversely, this story showed how politically powers are very happy to be associated with a project when there’s a prospect that such an association would work in its favour. I really thought that it was a great comment on today’s political system even though it was the British government the story was focussed on. There were times when all one could do was laugh about what was going on.

This story was more than just a nice little story about Salmon Fishing in the Yemen. It was about faith, belief, and pushing the envelope within yourself. It was a very rich story which allowed the reader into a world that we would perhaps not understand in a normal situation. Highly recommend this author’s work.
( )
  zarasecker18 | Aug 22, 2018 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 72 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
The impossible title of this extraordinary book took me back to a moment nearly 20 years ago. I had walked for three days down Wadi Surdud, one of the great seasonal watercourses that cut their way towards the Red Sea through the western highlands of Yemen. The scenery was extravagant - deep chasms sculpted by floodwater, pinnacles where lightning licked at high-perched castles, the seats of South Arabian lairds. At last, the gradient decreased, and as I rounded a bend I saw in one of the occasional pools that lay in the wadi bed something I have never seen in Yemen before or since: a man fishing with rod and line. Not, of course, for salmon: this was the coarsest of coarse fishing, for minnow-sized awshaj - I think a type of barbel - with a stick for a rod and a grain of maize for bait. The incongruous scene remains in my memory, and always will. Yemen is a memorable country: "Not a day will pass in your life," wrote the Master of Belhaven, a laird from the distant north, "but you will remember some facet of that opal-land."

Here, as well as lairds and castles, we have mists and glens, kilts, dirks and the odd feud or two. But unlike in Scotland the rain is considerate, coming at known seasons and times of day. It is also somewhat sparing, and there are no natural lochs or permanent rivers, and certainly no salmon (except smoked, on HBM ambassador's canapés). So Paul Torday's debut novel is about an impossibility. It is also about belief in the impossible, and belief itself. And the remarkable thing is that a book about so deeply serious a matter can make you laugh, all the way to a last twist that's as sudden and shocking as a barbed hook.

As with all good comedy, there's a tragic underside, a story of love and loss and another of love that never was. And there is satire. Torday's aim is deadly; but then, his targets are big. Jay Vent, the British prime minister, has taken his country into wars in Iraq and Afghanistan (and elsewhere in the region: the story is set in the nearish future . . .) and has dug himself into the deepest of holes. So what does he do? Of course: he goes on digging. "We're pretty much committed to going down a particular road in the Middle East," says Vent, a graduate, like his real-life counterpart, of the White Queen's school of logic, "and it would be difficult to change that very much without people beginning to ask why we'd started down it in the first place." . . .

adicionado por PLReader | editarThe Guardian, Tim Mackintosh-Smith (Feb 24, 2007)
 
This is an odd artefact. It depicts an attempt to introduce salmon to rivers in the Yemeni Highlands via the largesse of a local sheikh and the expertise of a UK government agency.

The book - it can scarcely be described as a novel - is constructed from supposed diary entries, letters, emails, extracts from Hansard, fragments of autobiography, a TV game show script, transcripts of television and press interviews, Select Committee Report conclusions and interrogations of the various participants in this madcap scheme. All have differing viewpoints and narrators. As such the whole becomes diffuse and bitty.

While there is an overall narrative thread the disparate voices too often fail to suspend disbelief. Instead of being presented with a convincing rendering of a diary extract or interview transcript we are given novelistic embellishments. The diary extracts contain information that we as readers ought to have but a diarist would not find it necessary to include. In one of the interviews a respondent states a person spoke mildly when surely they would report only the relevant conversation’s content, in another there is an (uncredited) interruption which reads, “The witness became emotional after the consumption of custard creams and was incoherent. The interview was resumed after a break of four hours.” This authorial interpolation is, I suppose, intended humorously but is, instead, bathetic, if not pathetic. The Hansard extracts do not quite reflect accurately the format of Prime Minister’s Questions. While it might be said that this is a comic novel and some licence is allowable, to get details such as this last example wrong detracts from the intended effect. Infelicities such as those above totally fail to create the necessary degree of verisimilitude. The name dropping of real people as interviewers - Andrew Marr, Boris Johnson - while the politicians and aides are fictional (yet recognisable) is also a mistake.

The book is obviously meant to be a satire but its approach is so scattershot that it is difficult to tell exactly what or whom is the intended target. Is it the workings of bureaucracies, office politics, communications directors/spin doctors, career women, politicians, even Islamic terrorists? All are featured, but the focus never stays in one place for long. The only character who has any semblance of solidity is the supposedly mad sheikh; and he has no viewpoint narrative.

After the novel’s end we also have “Reading Group Notes” containing items “for discussion.” Some may find this condescending.

Salmon Fishing In The Yemen has its moments; but they are few.
adicionado por jackdeighton | editarA Son Of The Rock, Jack Deighton
 

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This book is dedicated to my wife Penelope, who can catch salmon in bright sunlight and at low water, to the friends I fish with on the Tyne and the Tay, and to the men and women of the Environment Agency, without whom there would be far fewer fish in our rivers.
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Dear Dr Jones, We have been referred to you by Peter Sullivan at the Foreign & Commonwealth Office (Directorate for Middle East and North Africa).
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This is the story of Dr Alfred Jones, a fisheries scientist--for whom diary notable events include the acquisition of a new electric toothbrush and getting his article on caddis fly larvae published in "Trout and Salmon"--who finds himself reluctantly involved in a project to bring salmon fishing to the Highlands of the Yemen, a project that will change his life, and the course of British political history forever. With a wickedly wonderful cast of characters--including a visionary Sheikh, a weasely spin doctor, Fred's devilish wife and a few thousand transplanted salmon--"Salmon fishing in the Yemen" is a novel about hypocrisy and bureaucracy, dreams and deniability, and the transforming power of faith and love.

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