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Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American…
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Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence (original: 2013; edição: 2013)

de Joseph J. Ellis (Autor)

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5391733,622 (4.01)22
Pulitzer-winning American historian Joseph Ellis tells an old story in a new way, with a freshness at once colorful and compelling. The summer months of 1776 witnessed the most consequential events in the story of our country's founding. While the thirteen colonies came together and agreed to secede from the British Empire, the British were dispatching the largest armada ever to cross the Atlantic to crush the rebellion in the cradle. The Continental Congress and the Continental Army were forced to make decisions on the run, improvising as history congealed around them. In a brilliant and seamless narrative, Ellis meticulously examines the most influential figures in this propitious moment, including George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, and Britain's Admiral Lord Richard and General William Howe. He weaves together the political and military experiences as two sides of a single story, and shows how events on one front influenced outcomes on the other.--From publisher description.… (mais)
Membro:poorrichard
Título:Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence
Autores:Joseph J. Ellis (Autor)
Informação:Knopf (2013), Edition: First Edition, 240 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Etiquetas:American history

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Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence de Joseph J. Ellis (Author) (2013)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 17 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
5700. Revolutionary Summer The Birth of American Independence, by Joseph J. Ellis (read 26 Jul 2020) This is a very readable account of the events of 1776. It shows that we were very lucky that the British did not eliminate the American army when it was in New York City. When the British failed to eliminate the American Army in 1776 the chance of the British winning the war greatly dwindled. ( )
  Schmerguls | Aug 18, 2020 |
A detailed explanation and analysis of roughly May to October, 1776. Ellis dives into the events to explain the sentiments of the Americans, the British, the military players and the principal politicians on both sides. This level of detail illuminates much of how and why the revolution started and prevailed, in a way a wider view leaves unexplained. Mr. Ellis writes with clarity, insight and comparison of known facts to make his point. Any student of American History should read this short but detailed compilation of fact. ( )
  DonaldPowell | Feb 5, 2019 |
Nice succinct telling of the "summer" of 1776, from May to October, of the immediate lead up to our declaration to the military trials in New York. ( )
  Jarratt | Jun 21, 2018 |
I'm slowly working my way through my library's Revolutionary War offerings, given my obsession with Hamilton. I had a difficult time with this audiobook, as the reader (who has won numerous awards) was hard for me to understand. His voice was so very deep that sometimes it was hard to listen to in a casual way; it tended to take a lot of effort to listen to sometimes. But that was the only drawback.

The book looks at the events during a few months of 1776, which was the end of the beginning of the patriot cause and the beginning of the end of England's war. What I really liked about this book was that, unlike others I've read, it focused on both the political and battle side of things at the same time, showing how the two intertwined. I got a better idea of how actions on one side led to actions on the other, how they fed off each other, and how different their objectives were. I had no idea about a lot of what went was discussed; textbooks in history class tended to concentrate on what happened and not why or how. I loved seeing the personal sides of many of these historical figures--Adams being tasked with overseeing an army with no military experience and while worrying about his family during a Smallpox Epidemic, George Washington trying desperately to make moves with an army that was just trying to figure out how to army, and the Howe brothers not having the benefit of looking back and seeing what moves they should have made at the time. What a strange culture these men all had to live and work in. Those in charge of the English forces had power but were also supposed to be peacekeepers. Those on the patriot side were supposed to be loyal to their king and could only get ahead by using tricks and tactics while still having to be honorable men. George Washington not wanting to retreat but not wanting his men to die was so powerful.

I also liked how honest the book was about public perception. The newspapers didn't always print accurate information (or any information). It was hard for people to show they believed in the cause, because they could be killed or imprisoned as traitors. And definitely parts of the American victory was due to luck as much as the many other factors. Many people thought of revolution as inevitable, but some didn't. In addition, I liked that this book started out with several notes about the culture, such as the code of honor men operated under. Without that understanding, many of the actions wouldn't have made sense to me with my modern mindset (and the benefit of hindsight). It also went into detail about why the patriots faced so many different difficulties--not being able to create an army the same way the British could, not having funds, not having support of the people they were fighting for, not being able to agree on what they were trying to build or how much power the new government could have over the new state governments. Given all the struggle, it's a wonder America even became America!

This was a great look back at the events that helped create and shape the Revolution. I really enjoyed it. ( )
  katekintail | Jul 9, 2016 |
What a wonderful way Pulitzer Prize-winner Ellis has of distilling complicated historical events and people into a readable narrative! I’ve read his His Excellency, George Washington, too, and for the first time truly appreciated our first President. Both books are relatively short—around 200 pages—so if you need a doorstop, you’ll have to look elsewhere.
In Revolutionary Summer, Ellis takes the reader through the events of 1776, both before and after the Declaration of Independence. He says most histories of that era concentrate either on the political machinations within Independence Hall or on the travails of George Washington leading the ragtag Continental Army. Ellis’s contention is that the two threads—military and political—are inextricably intertwined, and the fates of each depended on the other.
As an example, the individual colonies-cum-states put their local political autonomy (an early manifestation of “states’ rights”) above the needs of the combined entity that the delegates in Philadelphia were promoting. While they’d occasionally contribute a few ill-trained and ill-equipped militias to the cause, they wouldn’t necessarily respond to Washington’s pleas for more.
On the political side, says Ellis, “Virginia regarded itself as the most important player in this political crisis, and the Virginians sent their resolutions [regarding independence] to all the other colonies on the assumption that they set the standard for others to imitate.” This mindset accords perfectly with genealogical research I’ve done about my family, in which early Georgia settlers from Virginia generally held themselves in much higher esteem than the “uncouth and rowdy” settlers from the Carolinas (my people!).
On the military side, Ellis makes the interesting point that “both (the British and American) armies would have been better served if their respective commanders had exchanged places. For Howe, in targeting the territory rather than the Continental Army, pursued the cautious strategy when he should have been bold. And Washington, in his very decision to defend New York, pursued the bold strategy when he should have been cautious.”
This book is a highly readable refresher if you’ve neglected your American History since, say, 10th grade. The United States has a great historical legacy, but by and large greatness is not necessarily found in the teaching of history nor in its textbooks. Revolutionary Summer is a bracing corrective. ( )
  Vicki_Weisfeld | Feb 3, 2016 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 17 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
You don’t need to buy a movie ticket to see this summer’s biggest blockbuster.
adicionado por WeeklyAlibi | editarWeekly Alibi, Nora Hickey (Jul 4, 2013)
 
“Revolutionary Summer” achieves its major goal: to undermine the popular myth that the birth of the United States was an “Immaculate Conception,” a victory won by local militias rather than by “a standing army of regular soldiers.” Government mattered in 1776. Ellis outlines this argument through a series of individual sketches, many of them familiar to readers of his Pulitzer Prize-winning “Founding Brothers” and subtle biographies of Adams, Jefferson and Washington. No one is better at explicating the role of personal character in public life, particularly the ways in which a preoccupation with honor, or reputation, informed 18th-­century gentlemen’s approach to power.

“Revolutionary Summer,” however, purports to be a history of national origins, not a collective biography of men who apparently talked only to one another. Make no mistake: the founding fathers earned the fame they coveted by making consequential decisions. But in the summer of 1776 they were concerned about much more than the British Army. The War for Independence was also a civil war within the British Empire and an episode in a continuing conflict over the fate of North America. Ellis’s book is not wrong; it’s just incomplete and superficial.
adicionado por rsubber | editarNew York Times Book Review, Andrew Cayton (Web site pago) (Jun 30, 2013)
 
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(Preface) If you will grant a somewhat expansive definition of summer, then the summer of 1776 was the crescendo moment in American history.
By the spring of 1776, British and American troops had been killing each other at a robust rate for a full year.
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Is it not a saying of Moses, "Who am I, that I should go in and out before this great People?" When I consider the great events which are passed, and those greater which are rapidly advancing, and that I may have been instrumental in touching some Springs, and turning some small Wheels, which have had and will have such Effects, I feel an Awe upon my Mind, which is not easily described. - John Adams to Abigail Adams, May 17, 1776
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Pulitzer-winning American historian Joseph Ellis tells an old story in a new way, with a freshness at once colorful and compelling. The summer months of 1776 witnessed the most consequential events in the story of our country's founding. While the thirteen colonies came together and agreed to secede from the British Empire, the British were dispatching the largest armada ever to cross the Atlantic to crush the rebellion in the cradle. The Continental Congress and the Continental Army were forced to make decisions on the run, improvising as history congealed around them. In a brilliant and seamless narrative, Ellis meticulously examines the most influential figures in this propitious moment, including George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, and Britain's Admiral Lord Richard and General William Howe. He weaves together the political and military experiences as two sides of a single story, and shows how events on one front influenced outcomes on the other.--From publisher description.

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