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Contagious: Why Things Catch On de Jonah…
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Contagious: Why Things Catch On (edição: 2016)

de Jonah Berger (Autor)

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7713621,420 (3.84)9
Wharton professor Jonah Berger draws on his research to explain the six steps that make products or ideas contagious.
Membro:itime2
Título:Contagious: Why Things Catch On
Autores:Jonah Berger (Autor)
Informação:Simon & Schuster (2016), Edition: Reprint, 256 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Contagious: Why Things Catch On de Jonah Berger

Adicionado recentemente porrick_saenz, the.paschal, nicoletommy, sunshine608, JonahK, zzEllis, joffcrabtree, paven, Sarah220, biblioteca privada

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» Veja também 9 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 36 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Light read. ( )
  Happenence | Oct 2, 2020 |
How does marketing work in an era where things go viral on the Internet and social media dominates our national discourse? Jonah Berger, a professor at the Wharton School of Business, has an understanding of how it can work and a philosophy of how you can use it to promote your work. Using terms like “social currency” and established concepts like social status, he describes how online marketing can work in a way that is inexpensive but effective. He does so in a manner that outperforms perhaps any other author on the subject.

Berger attempts to provide a coherent and comprehensive theoretical treatment. He defines several essential and mutually exclusive qualities of communication that might effectively communicate with potential customers. In the last chapter, he brings these qualities together to show why certain online communications work or didn’t work. He provides illustrations from history (or more accurately, builds his theory from historical examples). These stories not only convey his point; they also provide a context and a story that persuades the reader that he knows what he’s talking about.

This work will certainly appeal to marketers and to communicators, but it can also appeal to people (like me) who are interested in how the computer and the Internet are transforming the way we live. This book could not have been written in the early 1990s, but is essentially a foundation of marketing theory today. Berger teaches us that theory should not lag behind practice too much. He gives us a first draft of what that theory might look like. In so doing, he teaches us how we can draw a good audience for the work that is our lives.

( )
  scottjpearson | Jan 25, 2020 |
How does marketing work in an era where things go viral on the Internet and social media dominates our national discourse? Jonah Berger, a professor at the Wharton School of Business, has an understanding of how it can work and a philosophy of how you can use it to promote your work. Using terms like “social currency” and established concepts like social status, he describes how online marketing can work in a way that is inexpensive but effective. He does so in a manner that outperforms perhaps any other author on the subject.

Berger attempts to provide a coherent and comprehensive theoretical treatment. He defines several essential and mutually exclusive qualities of communication that might effectively communicate with potential customers. In the last chapter, he brings these qualities together to show why certain online communications work or didn’t work. He provides illustrations from history (or more accurately, builds his theory from historical examples). These stories not only convey his point; they also provide a context and a story that persuades the reader that he knows what he’s talking about.

This work will certainly appeal to marketers and to communicators, but it can also appeal to people (like me) who are interested in how the computer and the Internet are transforming the way we live. This book could not have been written in the early 1990s, but is essentially a foundation of marketing theory today. Berger teaches us that theory should not lag behind practice too much. He gives us a first draft of what that theory might look like. In so doing, he teaches us how we can draw a good audience for the work that is our lives.

( )
  scottjpearson | Jan 25, 2020 |
I cringe at this book. The author keeps mentioning that this book is the key to making viral videos or messages. His confidence is astonishing.

Having read through the book, I would say the tips he offered are decent and this will help in marketing product. His main points are social currency, triggers, high and low arousal emotions, make things public, practicality and stories ( )
  Wendy_Wang | Sep 28, 2019 |
A bit boring and repetitive ( )
  lucaconti | Jan 24, 2019 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 36 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Author and Wharton marketing professor Jonah Berger argues that, contrary to popular belief, advertising isn’t what makes something popular, but rather the secret science behind word-of-mouth and social transmission of ideas. This book provides a set of actionable techniques for helping information spread, perfect for any PR pro hoping their story will catch on.
adicionado por tim.taylor | editarRagan, Jessica Lawlor (Oct 1, 2018)
 
Mr. Berger seems intent here on giving readers advice about how to create viral products — he is, after all, a professor of marketing — and he’s unfortunately adopted a ham-handed PowerPoint approach to selling his arguments. He cites studies with dubious metrics (how, for example, do you score newspaper articles “based on how much awe they evoked”); repeats things over and over, as if sheer repetition would create a kind of stickiness; and uses awful, gobbledygook terms like "self-sharing," "inner remarkability" and "the urgency factor."
adicionado por lorax | editarNew York Times, Michiko Kakutani (Feb 25, 2012)
 
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