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A Tale for the Time Being

de Ruth Ozeki

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
4,4582522,600 (4.06)1 / 396
"A time being is someone who lives in time, and that means you, and me, and every one of us who is, or was, or ever will be." In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there's only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates' bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who's lived more than a century. A diary is Nao's only solace--and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox--possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao's drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future.… (mais)
  1. 21
    Life After Life de Kate Atkinson (bibliothequaire)
  2. 21
    To the Bright Edge of the World de Eowyn Ivey (pamelahuffman)
    pamelahuffman: In both books there are people in the present trying to make sense of journals and artifacts from the past. Loved both books.
  3. 00
    Hiroshima in the Morning de Rahna Reiko Rizzuto (susanbooks)
    susanbooks: Ozeki' s novel and Rizzuto's memoir are about daughters of Japanese mothers & American fathers who are trying to come to terms with world war 2 in the aftermath of 9/11. They're very different books, but both explore issues of mothering, memory, and loss.… (mais)
  4. 03
    1Q84 de Haruki Murakami (urban_lenny)
    urban_lenny: Similar concepts of multiple worlds
  5. 15
    Norwegian Wood de Haruki Murakami (tobiejonzarelli)
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Canada (21)
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Inglês (244)  Holandês (3)  Espanhol (2)  Dinamarquês (1)  Todos os idiomas (250)
Mostrando 1-5 de 250 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Ruth, living on an island in Canada, discovers a diary (written by Nau who lives in Japan), letters from WWII, and a watch inside a Hello Kitty lunchbox on the beach. They presumably made the Pacific crossing from Japan’s massive tsunami. Ruth, who is half Japanese is able to read the diary but not the letters. The diary, though, leads her to believe Nau and her father are intent on committing suicide. Ruth illogically thinks she can save them when in reality, given the time for the diary to cross the ocean, the deeds are probably already done. Everything about this situation though is unusual and time isn’t what we think it is. This is a very dark book and there are so many trigger warnings, I made a list:
Sexual Assault
Suicide
Harm to animals
9-11 jumper
Kamikazi pilot who doesn’t want to die
Prostitution
Tsunami
Radiation
Bullying is the one of the worst, and it makes the reader want to bail. However, it is resolved in the end with a most unique ending I may have ever read. I wish this book weren’t so dark. It really felt like the author was trying to make it as horrific as possible. So I had to take quite a long time to think on it before writing a review. Because of the ending, I recommend it. But beware of the darkness before the light. ( )
  KarenMonsen | Apr 14, 2024 |
Family Values
  BooksInMirror | Feb 19, 2024 |
Review Old Jiko style: Book is good. Book is bad. Same thing.

Overall, I really enjoyed this book. I loved the writing style and the mystery between Nao, Ruth and the Hello Kitty lunchbox. I adored Old Jiko and her words of wisdom. I was mostly interested in the stores of Haruki #1 and Haruki #2

It lost me a little bit towards the end with the quantum physics stuff and the receding ending to the story but I suppose the whole point was to make you consider the possibility of different worlds. I'm not sure that I believe!

Many readers may struggle with the focus on suicide, bullying and the dark side of Nao's life, but for me those sections helped provide necessary depth to the overall story. Those sections also made this a slow read for me....at times I had to force myself to go back because the story was sad and difficult for me even though I wanted to know what happened to our characters.

Overall I think it is well worth reading.



( )
  hmonkeyreads | Jan 25, 2024 |
Loved this message-in-a-bottle book! Told in two voices across a span of years, hinting that time is nonlinear and characters live in the moment when they are read. The author is a Zen Buddhist priest addressing the concepts of time, the life-giving power of words, quantum mechanics, multiple universes, and life as seen thru the eyes of a Japanese teen. ( )
  jemisonreads | Jan 22, 2024 |
A lovely, difficult book that will stay with me for a long time.

A Tale for the Time Being is a "You must change your life" kind of book. It's about time, death, consciousness, causality, and making meaning. It's also quirky and metafictional, but is nevertheless an accessible read, with likable characters and fairly linear storytelling.

Nao is a charming but depressed Japanese teenager dealing with brutal bullies, a suicidal father, and the aftershocks of family trauma from the Second World War. Nao keeps a diary that mysteriously ends up in the hands of Ruth, a fictionalized version of the author, who tries to track down Nao and reconstruct her life and fate. The novel dips its toe into the realms of speculative and surrealist fiction as it explores this relationship between reader and diarist.

A Tale for the Time Being feels like a catalog of strategies for responding to the impermanence and suffering of life: from suicide to making art to mindless Internet surfing to planting trees to the meditation practice of Nao's larger-than-life Buddhist nun great-grandmother. It's a book that goes deep, and at times it is an uncomfortable read. The forthright depictions of bullying, suicide, war, natural disaster, and sex work are never gratuitous, but they are graphic. That said, A Tale for the Time Being is absolutely a novel about hope. After Nao's spiral into darkness, subsequent moments of joy and rebirth feel earned.

If I didn't give this book five stars, it's only because it felt a little too linear, despite the meta, timey-wimey storytelling conceit. I wanted just a bit more ambiguity and weirdness, especially near the end.

Overall an excellent, profound read, and one that will hopefully inspire me to spend some time on my zafu this winter (I have a zafu and zabuton lovingly made by hippies in the Blue Ridge Mountains, so I truly have no excuse). ( )
  raschneid | Dec 19, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 250 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
In clever and deeply affecting ways, Ruth Ozeki’s luminous new novel explores notions of duality, causation, honour, and time. ... Though [the character] Ruth is clearly intended as a semi-autobiographical portrait of the author, it’s the character of Nao, in all her angsty adolescent dismissiveness, that Ozeki truly pulls off (here’s an author who should be writing YA novels).
adicionado por monnibo | editarQuill & Quire, Emily Donaldson (May 1, 2013)
 
A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki is expansive, provocative and sometimes rather confusing. But that’s okay. It’s supposed to be....It can leave you scratching your head – for starters, the main character of the novel seems to be Ruth Ozeki herself, or at least, a fairly obvious facsimile of her – but ultimately, the effect of such riddles is charming, earnest and very much a departure from your typical literary novel....Like them, Ozeki manages to turn existential conundrums into a playful, joyful and pleasantly mind-bending dialogue between reader and writer. Here’s hoping that this book will find its way to an audience just as excited to participate in it.
adicionado por zhejw | editarGlobe and Mail, Lucy Silag (Mar 29, 2013)
 
"A Tale for the Time Being"... is an exquisite novel: funny, tragic, hard-edged and ethereal at once.

[It's] heady stuff, but it hangs together for a couple of reasons — the exuberance of Ozeki's writing, the engaging nature of her characters and, not least, her scrupulous insistence that it doesn't have to hang together, that even as she ties up loose ends, others come unbound.
adicionado por zhejw | editarLos Angeles Times, David Ulin (Mar 21, 2013)
 
Seen from space, or from the vantage point of those conversant with Zen principles, A Tale for the Time Being is probably a deep and illuminating piece of work, with thoughtful things to say about the slipperiness of time. But for those positioned lower in the planet's stratosphere, Ozeki's novel often feels more like the great Pacific gyre it frequently evokes: a vast, churning basin of mental flotsam in which Schrödinger's cat, quantum mechanics, Japanese funeral rituals, crow species, fetish cafes, the anatomy of barnacles, 163 footnotes and six appendices all jostle for attention. It's an impressive amount of stuff.

One version of you might be intrigued. Another might pray it doesn't land on your shore.
adicionado por zhejw | editarThe Guardian, Liz Jensen (Mar 15, 2013)
 
If you’re a fan of the metaphysician Martin Heidegger, or the physicist Erwin Schrödinger, you will be pleased at the novel’s tip of the hat to their abstruse notions of time and sub-atomic space. There’s even an appendix to the novel explaining the “thought experiment” known to the world as “Schrödinger’s cat...But the novel suffers from a tinge of self satisfaction. It pits sensitive souls like the involuntary kamikaze pilot who loves French literature against brutal army officers, and it’s not a fair fight. The fight becomes Us — readers who derive spiritual sustenance from Marcel Proust, and appreciate “the value of kindness, of education, of independent thinking and liberal ideals” — versus Them, who are sheer brutes.
 

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Hi! My name is Nao, and I am a time being. Do you know what a time being is? Well, if you give me a moment, I will tell you.
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Een oude boeddha zei eens:

In de tijd, staan op de hoogste bergtop,
In de tijd, afdalen naar de bodem van de diepste zee,
In de tijd, een duivel met drie koppen en acht armen,
In de tijd, een vijf meter hoge boeddha van goud,
In de tijd, een monniksstaf of de vliegenmepper van een meester,
In de tijd, een pilaar of een lantaarn,
In de tijd, Jan en alleman,
In de tijd, de hele aarde en de eindeloze hemel.

- Dõgen Zenji, Bestaan in de tijd'
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"A time being is someone who lives in time, and that means you, and me, and every one of us who is, or was, or ever will be." In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there's only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates' bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who's lived more than a century. A diary is Nao's only solace--and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox--possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao's drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future.

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