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Er ist wieder da: Der Roman de Timur Vermes
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Er ist wieder da: Der Roman (original: 2012; edição: 2012)

de Timur Vermes (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,3978010,010 (3.43)58
He's back. Berlin, Summer 2011. Adolf Hitler wakes up on a patch of ground, alive and well. Things have changed - no Eva Braun, no Nazi party, no war. Hitler barely recognizes his beloved Fatherland, filled with immigrants and run by a woman. And he's fhrious. People certainly recognize him, albeit as a flawless impersonator who refuses to break character. The unthinkable, the inevitable happens, and the ranting Hitler goes viral, becomes a Youtube star, gets his own T.V. show, and people begin to listen. But the Fhrer has another programme with even greater ambition - to set the country he finds a shambles back to rights.… (mais)
Membro:GrahamMc
Título:Er ist wieder da: Der Roman
Autores:Timur Vermes (Autor)
Informação:Eichborn (2012), Edition: 21. Aufl. 2012, 400 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:to-read

Detalhes da Obra

Look Who's Back de Timur Vermes (2012)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 80 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Vermes misses a good opportunity to offer us a really good book.

He seems to know his character's background and he presents us a monomaniac, unable to learn and adapt Hitler, a person unable to accept or even approach ideas, concepts and values different than his. IMHO the way Vermes builds and represents Hitler is the only tolerable thing in his book, with the exception of a few scenes (like the one where Hitler visits the HQ of NPD, the German extreme-right political party).

The book succeeds in making some well aimed political remarks, but at the end I was left with the impression that the writer didn't really want to risk rocking the boat.

With the rising of the extreme-right all over Europe once more, this book could play the role of an alarming wake up call for everyone. Instead of that we get an often silly Hitler, to the verge of stupidity, turning him to a harmless and vain figure. Despite the fact that I agree with some of Hitler's features, I refuse to diminish Nazism to an obsolete, dead relic of the mid 20th century.

It is a huge mistake to underestimate fascism's brutal, inhuman political beliefs, allowing it to reemerge taking advantage once more of these difficult and turbulent times in conjunction with our nonchalance and indifference.

"Look who's back", could be an authentic and serious (despite its funny approach) warning to all of us.
Unfortunately, it isn't. ( )
  Stamat | Apr 20, 2021 |
Hilarious; exactly my sense of humor. It's mean and biting in the Swiftian sense. I've read a lot of novels - mostly sci-fi and fantasy - that tried to argue that many or most people would become Nazis if it "happened again." This book is the most convincing once I've read. ( )
  poirotketchup | Mar 18, 2021 |
Is it morally acceptable to feature Hitler as the rather likeable protagonist of a comic novel? Is it in good taste to turn a mass murderer into a figure of fun? These questions naturally come to mind when faced with Timur Vermes's first novel. The premise is simple - Hitler inexplicably wakes up in modern day Berlin and, mistaken for an uncannily brilliant method actor, lands a programme on national tv. Much of the resulting humour is, predictably, based on the reverse anachronisms raised by the Rip-van-Winkle situation. Hitler is astounded by the technological advances such as the "mouse device", the "internetwork" and the "Vikipedia", which he believes is named after the "intrepid explorer Teutons of old". He is flummoxed by the sight of "madwomen" walking their dogs and cleaning up after them,cannot understand why his goth scretary does not wear wholesome, colourful clothing and is impressed that Herr Starbuck has apparently taken over all the coffee houses in Berlin.

Vermes makes the most out of these scenes, but he is most incisive when he uses his character to satirize modern-day society, politics and media. On the whole, an entertaining and occasionally thought-provoking read. What is pleasantly surprising is that although the humour is probably quite culture and language-specific, the English translation is zesty, flowing and idiomatic. Kudos to Jamie Bulloch for this. ( )
  JosephCamilleri | Mar 5, 2021 |
Meine Schwester hat das Buch auf Niederländisch gelesen, fand es aber nicht so gut, eher anstrengend. Aber wenn es sich um eine historische Figur handelt, ist es besser, meiner Meinung nach, es in der originellen Sprache zu lesen.

Deswegen will ich das Buch auch mal auf Deutsch lesen, aber irgendwie ist das Hörbuch schon eine sehr angenehme Alternative. Christoph Maria Herbst kenne ich gar nicht, aber ich glaube, man hätte keinen besseren Sprecher finden können. Er macht die Geschichte lebendiger, vor allem wenn eine Figur wie Hitler sich im Jahr 2011 befindet, und gedanklich noch im Jahr 1945 ist. Er wird konfrontiert mit dem modernen Fernsehen, der Werbung, der Beschäftigung (z.B. Hartz IV), dem Überfluss von Papieren, Internet (Google, E-Mail, Wikipedia, ...), usw. In Kürze: mit der Wirklichtkeit. Ein Aufeinanderprallen der Kulturen, kann man sagen.

Herr Herbst macht das Hören wirklich spaßhaft. Emotion, Humor, verschiedene Stimmen (von Hitler und den anderen Personagen), ... er ist ein Meister! Wirklich klasse!

Aber, wie gesagt, will ich auf jeden Fall das Buch selbst lesen. Auch um die Geschichte besser zu verstehen, denn das Hörbuch muss man - äh, ich - eigentlich mehrmals hören. ;-) Hauptsächlich weil Deutsch nicht meine Muttersprache ist. ( )
  TechThing | Jan 22, 2021 |
I previously "read" (listened to) the audio version of this book, which you can read here. [a:Christoph Maria Herbst|3115563|Christoph Maria Herbst|https://d.gr-assets.com/authors/1389275680p2/3115563.jpg] did an awesome job in bringing Hitler alive. But I had also promised myself to read (!) the book, because it's a different way of experiencing the story.

Timur Vermes has a very fluent style, making this book a page-turner. You do need a more than average knowledge of German, also to "decode" the Berlin and Munich dialects that are used at some points in the book.

In short: Hitler awakens on a deserted site in Berlin, thinking WW2 is still going on, even though it's summer 2011. When he sees some kids playing football/soccer, he is confronted with modern society and how kids talk these days. He manages to go into town and get confirmation of the current era he's in. Since the war has been over for so long, many people are convinced that Hitler died back then and that the man standing in front of them is a comedian. But he's not left alone, he gets help with "new" clothes, the cleaning of his uniform and eventually a job!

Two men (Sawatzki and Sensenbrink) offer him a job in their production firm, which has its own tv channel. Hitler also discovers that modern society is mixed, that several shops and firms of his time don't exist anymore. Even the show in which he is a guest is run by someone with a Turkish background, who strongly opposes Hitler's views and behaviour. Not in the least, because the audience apparently very much likes what der Adolf says.

In fact, Hitler's image rises to new heights, thanks to modern technology like the internet, Youtube, and so on. Obviously, even this is foreign territory for Hitler: ICT. He gets his own computer, smartphone, and so on. At first, he's wary of it all, but then he realizes the potential of these products. Back in the day, news was delivered via the radio. Since Hitler's mind-state is still in the period of WW2, he finds it strange that television has become so popular; at the same time he imagines what he could have done when television would have been so big in his earlier days.

It's funny here that, when Hitler's e-mail account needs to be set up, his birth date has to be entered. So he says: "20. April 1889." To which his secretary, still not realizing it's really Hitler and her not paying attention to the 18 in 1889, replies: "Hitler89 ist ooch weg. Hitler 204 - nee, mit Ihrem Namen kommen wa nicht weita."

Of course, the press (in this case, the newspaper Bild) tries to find out about Hitler, about his true identity and name by spreading lies or filtering their articles. Still no one believes it's really him, despite his way of speaking, his views on immigrants, his knowledge of the countries he invaded and how he did it, etc... But Hitler (always in collaboration with his colleagues at Flashlight, the production firm) decide to fight back. One of the ways is an own website, dedicated to Hitler. People can see video clips, go into discussion with Hitler, and more.

In any case, Hitler is hot in Germany, almost everywhere he comes, even at the annual Oktoberfest in Munich. He was invited there, but was advised to come at a later hour, to avoid the masses. Upon arrival, he witnesses how the masses indeed get drunk until they collapse, how the revert to primal behaviour. However, he also sees how the more adult people see Oktoberfest as a means to rekindle their former youth, though not in a successful way (in Hitler's eyes).

Hitler is not hot in all of Germany, though. There comes a time when talking your way out of the situation (as he did very often to convince people they were "wrong" and he was "right", or, in one word: manipulation) isn't going to cut it. And avoiding the blows isn't something Hitler had thought about. He ends up in hospital and all of a sudden then, almost every political party wants to offer him a place (for a short or long[er] period of time). He considers these offers, then thinks back of his former political career and how he helped himself to rise on the political ladder. His political views have, despite his experiencing of the modern world, not changed in the least. He's still convinced of purifying Germany, of re-establishing order (the sort he was used to when he was younger), of rebuilding his empire. The only difference is: He has access to modern means, means that can more easily influence people. His TV shows and website certainly contributed to building the foundations for a new political career, and most people aren't aware of this.

Extrapolate this to our society today and it proves to be a very dangerous happening (see Putin [Russia], Erdoğan [Turkey], the EU countries unable to find a solution for the refugee crisis and thus some countries closing their borders, the situation in Belgium [right-wing government], ...).

This book is not only satire (it's hilarious to see the contrast between Hitler's "old-fashioned" thinking and reactions, and how so much has changed over the years), it also (rightly) criticizes the way the media works these days (twisting the facts, focusing on sensationalism, ...), how much bureaucracy there is (filling out of hundreds of documents for every silly request, by manner of speech).

For those who(se family members, friends, ...) have experienced Hitler's acts, I can understand they won't find this book funny, just like, in the book, his secretary's (ms Krömeier) grand-mother, whose family members were killed in the gas chambers.

What I didn't know, is that Hitler apparently was a vegetarian and not so much a fan of alcohol (he did drink it, though in small quantities), more so of still water.

In short: The audio version was hilarious, and Herbst's voice added to that very much, but the book wasn't less funny. On the contrary, it allowed me to "read" the book in a different way, to understand certain details a bit better. Hitler is two-faced here: He's funny, or more specifically because of the contrast between Hitler's view on life and modern society's view, but he remains a vicious character, who should not be underestimated. He still tries to finish what he started. Recommended reading (and listening :-) ), certainly the German version to avoid things getting lost in translation, as it apparently happened in the Dutch version. ( )
  TechThing | Jan 22, 2021 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (18 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Timur Vermesautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Andersson, KarinTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Bulloch, JamieTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gabelli, FrancescaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Nes, Liesbeth vanTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Slobodan DamnjanovićTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Wiebel, JohannesDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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He's back. Berlin, Summer 2011. Adolf Hitler wakes up on a patch of ground, alive and well. Things have changed - no Eva Braun, no Nazi party, no war. Hitler barely recognizes his beloved Fatherland, filled with immigrants and run by a woman. And he's fhrious. People certainly recognize him, albeit as a flawless impersonator who refuses to break character. The unthinkable, the inevitable happens, and the ranting Hitler goes viral, becomes a Youtube star, gets his own T.V. show, and people begin to listen. But the Fhrer has another programme with even greater ambition - to set the country he finds a shambles back to rights.

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