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Two Cheers for Anarchism: Six Easy Pieces on…
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Two Cheers for Anarchism: Six Easy Pieces on Autonomy, Dignity, and… (edição: 2012)

de James C. Scott (Autor)

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James Scott taught us what's wrong with seeing like a state. Now, in his most accessible and personal book to date, the acclaimed social scientist makes the case for seeing like an anarchist. Inspired by the core anarchist faith in the possibilities of voluntary cooperation without hierarchy, Two Cheers for Anarchism is an engaging, high-spirited, and often very funny defense of an anarchist way of seeing--one that provides a unique and powerful perspective on everything from everyday social and political interactions to mass protests and revolutions. Through a wide-ranging series of memorable anecdotes and examples, the book describes an anarchist sensibility that celebrates the local knowledge, common sense, and creativity of ordinary people. The result is a kind of handbook on constructive anarchism that challenges us to radically reconsider the value of hierarchy in public and private life, from schools and workplaces to retirement homes and government itself. Beginning with what Scott calls "the law of anarchist calisthenics," an argument for law-breaking inspired by an East German pedestrian crossing, each chapter opens with a story that captures an essential anarchist truth. In the course of telling these stories, Scott touches on a wide variety of subjects: public disorder and riots, desertion, poaching, vernacular knowledge, assembly-line production, globalization, the petty bourgeoisie, school testing, playgrounds, and the practice of historical explanation. Far from a dogmatic manifesto, Two Cheers for Anarchism celebrates the anarchist confidence in the inventiveness and judgment of people who are free to exercise their creative and moral capacities.… (mais)
Membro:yrthroat
Título:Two Cheers for Anarchism: Six Easy Pieces on Autonomy, Dignity, and Meaningful Work and Play
Autores:James C. Scott (Autor)
Informação:Princeton University Press (2012), Edition: 9/14/12, 200 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Etiquetas:to-read

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Two Cheers for Anarchism: Six Easy Pieces on Autonomy, Dignity, and Meaningful Work and Play de James C. Scott

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Was the author trying to say something? ( )
  Paul_S | Dec 23, 2020 |
scott's account of the way social control operates relies on a pretty solid and unoriginal marxist critique of the capitalist state (e.g. bowles and gintis' correspondence theory is elaborated on at great length). where this book shines is his account of his own theories: "infrapolitics" (the way that subaltern groups have got what they wanted not through democratic institutional engines but through small acts of resistance) and his belief that the petty bourgeoisie represents a space outside the greater machinations of the state. i wish more space had been dedicated to them because reading his thoughts about education was genuinely a slog. ( )
  livingtoast | Jan 23, 2019 |
There's nothing radical in this book, Scott just puts everything in perspective, and suddenly being an Anarchist is about radical change, just common sense. ( )
  simonspacecadet | Jul 29, 2018 |
A short, nuanced text on the uses and possibilities of insubordination, dissent and mutualism. Scott's sympathies tend toward cooperative rather than individualist anarchism, and he is careful to acknowledge the paradoxical relationship between society and the individual.

Unlike the doctrinaire antistatist, Scott recognizes the interplay (if not outright interdependence) between public authority and liberty. For instance, he writes, the social capital and habits of mutuality that provide the foundation for the formal order of the state precede the state. The state cannot create and in fact undercuts such habits. Also, the interplay of order, authority and liberty is not necessarily a zero-sum game. If relative equality is a necessary condition of mutuality and freedom, how can it be guaranteed except through the state?

While the past three centuries have seen the apparent ‘triumph of standardized, official landscapes of control and appropriation over the vernacular order’—the homogenization of language, practices and pedagogies; algorithms of urban planning and manufacture—myriad forms of informal cooperation and coordination are nonetheless a regular experience of most people. Informal, transient networks of coordination without formal organization or hierarchy operate at the local village or neighborhood level all the time. Anarchistic mutuality as a mode of human experience operates side-by-side with and in spite of the dominant authoritarian trends. ‘The actual work process in any office, on any construction site, or on any factory floor cannot be adequately explained by the rules governing it; the work gets done only because of the effective informal understandings and improvisations outside those rules.’ Authority wobbles and leaks.

We are in an important sense subjects of a facade of power. 'The symbolic work of official power is intended to obscure the confusion, spontaneity, error and improvisation of political power as it is in fact exercised, beneath a smooth surface of deliberation and rationality.' In modern pluralist societies, the static concept of ‘efficiency’ is always contending with complexity, variety and mobility. Ultimately, the expansion of human freedom has not been the result of orderly, institutional procedures but of disorderly, unpredictable, spontaneous action cracking open the social order from below. It is entirely reasonable, says Scott, that this process of expanding freedom should be ongoing. Squat. Poach. Desert your post. Waste company time. Change your mind.

The chief virtues of the prudent anarchist, suggests Scott, are patience, and tolerance for the confusion and improvisation that accompanies social learning. Of course, we have no assurance that the citizenry will learn to favor liberty and voluntary cooperation over demagoguery or know-nothing obduracy, and developments in the present century suggest there is yet much to be wished for in that regard. Still, ... ( )
  HectorSwell | Dec 31, 2017 |
This is a bit different for a book about power. Scott argues that it’s mainly disorganized movements of pissed-off people that produce political change; leadership generally comes only afterwards, and often doesn’t have much of a clue what the ordinary people in the movement want. I’m in deep agreement with him that a radical wing is necessary for moderates to look worth compromising with, and I certainly understand his point that government power tends to accrete without additional payoff after an initial important intervention. But I wanted to be more hopeful after I finished than I was. ( )
  rivkat | Dec 23, 2016 |
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In Two Cheers for Anarchism, his intriguing but occasionally silly book, Mr. Scott doesn't pretend to abide by a utopian antigovernment philosophy or to renew the prescriptions of 19th-century Russian anarchists who wanted to overthrow the czarist state. Rather, he argues for a return to "mutuality" and organic human cooperativeness. The bulk of his book is thus dedicated to criticizing the niggling little tyrannies of everyday life in free-market democracies, from superstores that have replaced more humane mom-and-pop enterprises to the attempts of agribusiness to impose factory-like standardization on nature itself. As if to account for the bagginess of such a project, Mr. Scott divides his book into a series of essay fragments loosely bound together by themes rather than a linear thesis.
adicionado por sgump | editarWall Street Journal, Michael Weiss (Dec 5, 2012)
 
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James Scott taught us what's wrong with seeing like a state. Now, in his most accessible and personal book to date, the acclaimed social scientist makes the case for seeing like an anarchist. Inspired by the core anarchist faith in the possibilities of voluntary cooperation without hierarchy, Two Cheers for Anarchism is an engaging, high-spirited, and often very funny defense of an anarchist way of seeing--one that provides a unique and powerful perspective on everything from everyday social and political interactions to mass protests and revolutions. Through a wide-ranging series of memorable anecdotes and examples, the book describes an anarchist sensibility that celebrates the local knowledge, common sense, and creativity of ordinary people. The result is a kind of handbook on constructive anarchism that challenges us to radically reconsider the value of hierarchy in public and private life, from schools and workplaces to retirement homes and government itself. Beginning with what Scott calls "the law of anarchist calisthenics," an argument for law-breaking inspired by an East German pedestrian crossing, each chapter opens with a story that captures an essential anarchist truth. In the course of telling these stories, Scott touches on a wide variety of subjects: public disorder and riots, desertion, poaching, vernacular knowledge, assembly-line production, globalization, the petty bourgeoisie, school testing, playgrounds, and the practice of historical explanation. Far from a dogmatic manifesto, Two Cheers for Anarchism celebrates the anarchist confidence in the inventiveness and judgment of people who are free to exercise their creative and moral capacities.

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