Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Master Of The Senate: The Years of Lyndon…
Carregando...

Master Of The Senate: The Years of Lyndon Johnson (original: 2002; edição: 2003)

de Robert A. Caro (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,876286,567 (4.6)99
Master of the Senate, Book Three of The Years of Lyndon Johnson, carries Johnson's story through one of its most remarkable periods: his twelve years, from 1949 to 1960, in the United States Senate. At the heart of the book is its unprecedented revelation of how legislative power works in America, how the Senate works, and how Johnson, in his ascent to the presidency, mastered the Senate as no political leader before him had ever done.   It was during these years that all Johnson's experience--from his Texas Hill Country boyhood to his passionate representation in Congress of his hardscrabble constituents to his tireless construction of a political machine--came to fruition. Caro introduces the story with a dramatic account of the Senate itself: how Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, and John C. Calhoun had made it the center of governmental energy, the forum in which the great issues of the country were thrashed out. And how, by the time Johnson arrived, it had dwindled into a body that merely responded to executive initiatives, all but impervious to the forces of change. Caro anatomizes the genius for political strategy and tactics by which, in an institution that had made the seniority system all-powerful for a century and more, Johnson became Majority Leader after only a single term-the youngest and greatest Senate Leader in our history; how he manipulated the Senate's hallowed rules and customs and the weaknesses and strengths of his colleagues to change the "unchangeable" Senate from a loose confederation of sovereign senators to a whirring legislative machine under his own iron-fisted control.   Caro demonstrates how Johnson's political genius enabled him to reconcile the unreconcilable: to retain the support of the southerners who controlled the Senate while earning the trust--or at least the cooperation--of the liberals, led by Paul Douglas and Hubert Humphrey, without whom he could not achieve his goal of winning the presidency. He shows the dark side of Johnson's ambition: how he proved his loyalty to the great oil barons who had financed his rise to power by ruthlessly destroying the career of the New Dealer who was in charge of regulating them, Federal Power Commission Chairman Leland Olds. And we watch him achieve the impossible: convincing southerners that although he was firmly in their camp as the anointed successor to their leader, Richard Russell, it was essential that they allow him to make some progress toward civil rights. In a breathtaking tour de force, Caro details Johnson's amazing triumph in maneuvering to passage the first civil rights legislation since 1875.   Master of the Senate, told with an abundance of rich detail that could only have come from Caro's peerless research, is both a galvanizing portrait of the man himself--the titan of Capital Hill, volcanic, mesmerizing--and a definitive and revelatory study of the workings and personal and legislative power.… (mais)
Membro:trotta
Título:Master Of The Senate: The Years of Lyndon Johnson
Autores:Robert A. Caro (Autor)
Informação:Vintage (2003), Edition: Vintage Books ed., 1232 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

Master of the Senate de Robert A. Caro (2002)

Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 99 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 28 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
When does a biography become a work of art? First -- indispensably -- when its scholarship, accuracy and factual density create a sense of confidence in its veracity. Next, when it thoughtfully draws together and juxtaposes themes and narratives of the times, lives, trends in which its subject is embedded. Ultimately, when it illuminates understanding of a culture, of an historic institution like the Senate, of human psychology and the mysteries of political leadership by a deeply flawed, yet compelling, human being. And, finally, when all these are done with superb skill, objectivity and insight. This book has them all, and elevates biography to the highest ranks of literature.

Like other great works of history, this book tells us much about the past, and about the present. For instance, its account of the history and impacts of the filibuster could not be more timely. And it serves as a chastening counterweight to our tendency to make snap judgments, to deem a leader a hero or a snake, without awaiting or understanding the deeper perspectives of context and time.

The paradox of Caro is that he is both mercilessly penetrating about his subject, and yet deeply respectful in presenting LBJ as a whole human being and a remarkably powerful personality. Because Caro succeeds in this dual evocation, Master of the Senate delivers, richly, and uplifts our understanding and appreciation of American political life. ( )
  oatleyr | Aug 22, 2020 |
Obviously, it took me a long time to finish this book. I have it in both hardcover and audio formats,and started reading it in print, but "read" most of it in audio and primarily while walking my dog or, sometimes, washing dishes. I learned so much from this book, as it explains the Senate's role in American politics leading up to Johnson's Senate years, with special emphasis on Sen. Richard Russell, one of LBJ's mentors. Johnson was elected to the Senate the year I was born and left it when I was in 7th grade and just beginning to be really aware of politics. So the years Master of the Senate covers are part of my own history, but mostly because many of the leading characters were still in politics when I began following it (Hubert Humphrey, Mike Mansfield, Sam Rayburn, et al.) They include the Korean War in which my father served, and the beginnings of the Civil Rights Movement which played such a large part as the context of my high school and college years.

The most fascinating part of Master of the Senate to me was Caro's explanation of LBJ's lifelong tension between a very real compassion for the oppressed in our country (because he was a Texan, to him these were primarily African-Americans and Mexican-Americans) and his desperate need for power. He wanted very much to have the Democratic nomination for President in both 1956 and 1960, but realized that to get it he would have to rise above the Southern racism that virtually all Southern politicians adhered to in those days. His chance came with the 1957 Civil Rights Act, an Eisenhower Administration bill sponsored by Republicans. (Yes, things have changed a lot since then.) Although the bill was stripped of several of its original provisions, the voting rights section was retained, and as Majority Leader of the Senate, Johnson is due much of the credit for its passage. At this juncture in his life, his compassion and his ambition worked together.

The story of Lyndon Johnson is one of the great tragedies of American history. To go from passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and a landslide victory in the '64 election to being the subject of chants like "Hey, Hey, LBJ, How many kids did you kill today?" and the cheers on my college campus when he announced he wouldn't be running in the 1968 election, followed by his death only four years later, is almost a textbook definition of tragedy; and hubris LBJ certainly had. I'm beginning to think that one of the reasons for his fall was that, if Caro hasn't left anything out (and it's hard to believe he has), LBJ was not that interested in foreign policy until he became President. Caro mentions in Master of the Senate, almost as an aside, a conversation that took place while Johnson was on a Senate junket to Paris -- which he had "reluctantly" been persuaded to participate in. Reluctantly! Paris! The Korean War and Sputnik seem to have been the only events that turned him from his focus on domestic affairs, and his main interest in them appeared to be holding hearings on preparedness in the first case and the "missile gap" in the second. This could not have served him well in the quagmire of Vietnam. (My take on it, and I'm open to correction.)

I'm going to catch up on some other reading for a while, but I already have an audio file of Passage to Power, the next volume in The Years of Lyndon Johnson. I consider this one of the greatest works of history and biography that I have come across and I urge everyone who can to read it. ( )
  auntieknickers | Aug 21, 2020 |
In 1949, Lyndon Johnson joined the United States Senate, an institution radically different from the one in 2020. Robert Caro describes the U.S. Senate as the battlefield that the Confederacy had actually won. It was the stronghold of the South, a blockade in the road to social justice. The rules of the Senate were such that a minority coalition of Southern Senators could block or filibuster the passage of any bill that advanced the progress of civil rights, nerving as “the South’s unending revenge upon the North for Gettysburg.”

Simply put, the Senate did not work- until Johnson took control of it. Lyndon Johnson became the master of an institution that had never before had a master- all within his first term. He did this by identifying where the power was held and aggressively sought to claim it. He took on unpopular leadership roles and transformed them to suit himself. His journey was never about getting his own agenda passed. It was always just about advancing the career of Senator Lyndon B. Johnson. This books explains in detail exactly what and why Johnson accomplished. The man was a psychopathic racist but he is ultimately responsible for the civil rights bill that no one else could pass. ( )
  ARIZ12 | Jul 31, 2020 |
The third volume of Robert Caro's epic biography of Lyndon Johnson covers what would prove to be the pivotal years in his ascent to the presidency -- his years in the United States Senate. Here he sets out to achieve three goals: to show how Johnson exercised power, to chronicle how Johnson positioned himself to run for the presidency, and to explain the conundrum of Johnson's personality. In the first two goals Caro's book is an unqualified success, as Caro explains how Johnson transformed the post of Senate Majority Leader into a position of power for the first time and used the higher profile the office provided to run for the White House. It is the third goal that is the most challenging, however, and here Caro's success is more qualified. He goes far in reconciling the conflict between a man who demonstrated such cruelty in his personal life and use of political power yet whose compassion for the poor and disadvantaged brought about a fundamental transformation of the nation, yet perhaps in the end the conundrum that makes Lyndon Johnson so fascinating is ultimately irreconcilable. For anyone seeking to understand that conundrum, however, Caro's book is indispensable, and is must-reading for anyone interested in his fascinating, complex, and historic subject. ( )
  MacDad | Mar 27, 2020 |
Detailed years of Johnson in Senate. Chased a lot of rabbits in his writing but a good biographical record.
  pwaldrep | Mar 14, 2019 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 28 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
adicionado por danielx | editarThe Atlantic Monthly, Ronald Steel (Apr 13, 2012)
 
It makes a wonderful, a glorious tale. The book reads like a Trollope novel, but not even Trollope explored the ambitions and the gullibilities of men as deliciously as Robert Caro does. I laughed often as I read. And even though I knew what the outcome of a particular episode would be, I followed Caro's account of it with excitement. I went back over chapters to make sure I had not missed a word.
 
In the 1957 civil rights battle, ambition and compassion were finally mixed in the perfect combination for Lyndon Johnson and the country. The same can be said for Robert A. Caro, whose chronicle of Lyndon B. Johnson's outsize life has finally, too, been told with perfect balance.
adicionado por Shortride | editarThe New York Times, Jill Abramson (Apr 24, 2002)
 
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
I do understand power, whatever else may be said about me.  I know where to look for it, and how to use it.
- Lyndon Baines Johnson
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For Ina, always
and for Bob Gottlieb
Thirty years.  Four books.  Thanks.
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Introduction) The room on the first floor of the Barbourville County Courthouse in the little town of Eufala, Alabama, was normally the County Clerk's Office, but after it had closed for the day on August 2, 1957, it was being used by the county's Board of Registrars, the body that registered citizens so they could vote in elections - not that the Board was going to register any of the three persons who were applying that day, for the skin of these applicants was black.
The Chamber of the United States Senate was a long, cavernous space - over a hundred feet long.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico
Master of the Senate, Book Three of The Years of Lyndon Johnson, carries Johnson's story through one of its most remarkable periods: his twelve years, from 1949 to 1960, in the United States Senate. At the heart of the book is its unprecedented revelation of how legislative power works in America, how the Senate works, and how Johnson, in his ascent to the presidency, mastered the Senate as no political leader before him had ever done.   It was during these years that all Johnson's experience--from his Texas Hill Country boyhood to his passionate representation in Congress of his hardscrabble constituents to his tireless construction of a political machine--came to fruition. Caro introduces the story with a dramatic account of the Senate itself: how Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, and John C. Calhoun had made it the center of governmental energy, the forum in which the great issues of the country were thrashed out. And how, by the time Johnson arrived, it had dwindled into a body that merely responded to executive initiatives, all but impervious to the forces of change. Caro anatomizes the genius for political strategy and tactics by which, in an institution that had made the seniority system all-powerful for a century and more, Johnson became Majority Leader after only a single term-the youngest and greatest Senate Leader in our history; how he manipulated the Senate's hallowed rules and customs and the weaknesses and strengths of his colleagues to change the "unchangeable" Senate from a loose confederation of sovereign senators to a whirring legislative machine under his own iron-fisted control.   Caro demonstrates how Johnson's political genius enabled him to reconcile the unreconcilable: to retain the support of the southerners who controlled the Senate while earning the trust--or at least the cooperation--of the liberals, led by Paul Douglas and Hubert Humphrey, without whom he could not achieve his goal of winning the presidency. He shows the dark side of Johnson's ambition: how he proved his loyalty to the great oil barons who had financed his rise to power by ruthlessly destroying the career of the New Dealer who was in charge of regulating them, Federal Power Commission Chairman Leland Olds. And we watch him achieve the impossible: convincing southerners that although he was firmly in their camp as the anointed successor to their leader, Richard Russell, it was essential that they allow him to make some progress toward civil rights. In a breathtaking tour de force, Caro details Johnson's amazing triumph in maneuvering to passage the first civil rights legislation since 1875.   Master of the Senate, told with an abundance of rich detail that could only have come from Caro's peerless research, is both a galvanizing portrait of the man himself--the titan of Capital Hill, volcanic, mesmerizing--and a definitive and revelatory study of the workings and personal and legislative power.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (4.6)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 16
3.5 8
4 55
4.5 15
5 195

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 157,744,661 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível