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At the mountains of madness de H. P.…
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At the mountains of madness (original: 1936; edição: 2005)

de H. P. Lovecraft

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9983915,800 (3.75)6
Introduction by China Miéville Long acknowledged as a master of nightmarish visions, H. P. Lovecraft established the genuineness and dignity of his own pioneering fiction in 1931 with his quintessential work of supernatural horror, At the Mountains of Madness. The deliberately told and increasingly chilling recollection of an Antarctic expedition’s uncanny discoveries–and their encounter with untold menace in the ruins of a lost civilization–is a milestone of macabre literature. This exclusive new edition, presents Lovecraft’s masterpiece in fully restored form, and includes his acclaimed scholarly essay “Supernatural Horror in Literature.” This is essential reading for every devotee of classic terror.… (mais)
Membro:hexedclarity
Título:At the mountains of madness
Autores:H. P. Lovecraft
Informação:New York : Modern Library, 2005.
Coleções:Sua biblioteca, Para ler
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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At the Mountains of Madness: The Definitive Edition de H. P. Lovecraft (1936)

Adicionado recentemente porbiblioteca privada, TobinElliott, sigshane, wanderlustlover, jlabarge, ALLTHEBOOKS, martin.hex.sirois
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This review isn't necessarily for the edition with the Mieville intro. This is for an audiobook version I found online (god knows I'll never do that again...you'll know why by the end of the review). I've only had passing acquaintance with Lovecraft, so I've decided to go through as much of his stuff as I can. Now, while this story draws on or name checks a ton of Lovecraft's previous monsters and tropes, and from everything I can see, is hailed as a classic of the genre. Only...virtually nothing happens. It's a guided tour, an article that would be read in Architectural Digest From Hell. It got to the point that I stated, loudly and repeatedly, "Enough already!" everytime I was treated to yet another measurement or longitude/latitude. And, though some may find this mean, I have to mention that the audio version I listened to actually added an element of hilarity. Imagine hearing, right off the top, "At The Mountains Of Madness, by H. P. Wovecwaft, wed fow you by Mowgan Scowpion." Seriously, if you have a speech impediment, recording audiobooks is not a good career choice. When I heard "Had the subtewwanean watews fwozen at wast (Had the subterranean waters frozen at last)?" I couldn't help the tears of laughter. Not exactly what you want when you're reading a "horror classic." A surreal experience.
So bad it's almost good. ( )
  TobinElliott | Sep 3, 2021 |
I got about a 1/3rd of the way through this before I lost my mind. Not because of cthulhu horrors, but because the way its written drove me crazy. I swear HP spent 3-4 pages describing a building, and like he just used a thesaurus for every neat word he could think of and crammed it into the sentence. It was mind numbingly bored. I was too confused, bored, and distracted to be scared. I do not recommend this, sadly. I read that some people love it, I am not one of those people.
  bhiggs | Jul 30, 2021 |
This is really a great place to end my current reading of HP Lovecraft. Here we get the story of an Antarctic expedition that goes off the rails in the most Lovecraftian way possible. They find not only the madness inducing beasties but a whole civilization thereof from billions of years ago.

Overall, Mountains of Madness plays directly to Lovecraft's strengths: the world building. There isn't much in the way of plot or character (although more than in some of his stories). Instead what we get is a mix of history spanning literally billions of years with the human narrators exploring the ruins.

Regardless of how much less sense this alternate history makes sense in modern times with what we've seen of the world, it's fascinating to read from the lens of a world that hasn't seen quite as much. In particular, it's an interesting culmination of Lovecraft's works, seeing hints of how the Old Ones interacted with other beings we've seen in his other stories.

This is probably one of my favorite of Lovecraft's works thus far and I think a good place to move on for the time being. I still have Dexter Ward to read at some point... but that can wait. ( )
  jpv0 | Jul 21, 2021 |
Despite our speed, they were very slow in gaining prominence; hence we knew that they must be infinitely far off, and visible only because of their abnormal height. Little by little, however, they rose grimly into the western sky; allowing us to distinguish various bare, bleak, blackish summits, and to catch the curious sense of phantasy which they inspired as seen in the reddish antarctic light against the provocative background of iridescent ice-dust clouds. In the whole spectacle there was a persistent, pervasive hint of stupendous secrecy and potential revelation; as if these stark, nightmare spires marked the pylons of a frightful gateway into forbidden spheres of dream, and complex gulfs of remote time, space, and ultra-dimensionality. I could not help feeling that they were evil things—mountains of madness whose farther slopes looked out over some accursed ultimate abyss.

It is maybe the perfect encapsulation of my frustration with Lovecraft that he kept typing for one more useless sentence after that delicious description. The man was an awful writer. And this story does suffer from all his tics: The use of his own Mythos as a crutch. Latching onto other authors and artists instead of telling his own story. The word 'Cyclopean', which I would pay money to never see in print again (but hey I have more Lovecraft to read so not happening). And we've gone from never seeing the horror to plopping really unlikely xenothropological treatises on their homes and gardens into the middle of the action. Not to mention garish, hard to visualize but so very exact descriptions of alien biology. And yet. Yet. Here, in the midst of this unlikely wander across Antarctica, right in the height of an actually really nail biting passage, something truly transcendent happens. Something that rose up out of Lovecraft's whole edifice of works so far and simply took my breath away. Lovecraft, who hated everything that is not white and patrician and New English, who could hardly stand to look at people who are not exactly like himself, allows his protagonist one moment of perfect empathy with the Other. (Mind you, I don't know if this moment will have the same impact for someone who hasn't just slogged through the three quarters of the man's work that was written before this story, but I suspect it will still work.) This, along with the protagonist's genuine love for his companions, and the especially poignant portraits of Lake and Danforth, combine to lift this short work into something almost sublime. I really don't recommend you read much Lovecraft, but this one is worth your time. I'm off to look for a good audio performance. I read the last couple of sections aloud and it really enhanced the experience, I think.

(Freebie: Since I already had to look it up, here is one of the paintings Lovecraft thought everyone ought to see:)


"Crossroad of Christ and Buddha" by Nicholas Roerich

Reviewed September 16, 2017. ( )
  amyotheramy | May 11, 2021 |
I'm torn- do I give it a 5 for depicting the details of a bizarre and foreign civilization whose existence renders humanity as nothing more than a insignificant modern blip, or a 1 for having that civilization be such a heavy-handed racist metaphor? ( )
  waveBidder | Dec 14, 2020 |
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This is the Modern Library edition which contains an introduction by China Miéville, "At the Mountains of Madness," and Lovecraft's essay "Supernatural Horror in Literature." Please do not combine with other collections.
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Introduction by China Miéville Long acknowledged as a master of nightmarish visions, H. P. Lovecraft established the genuineness and dignity of his own pioneering fiction in 1931 with his quintessential work of supernatural horror, At the Mountains of Madness. The deliberately told and increasingly chilling recollection of an Antarctic expedition’s uncanny discoveries–and their encounter with untold menace in the ruins of a lost civilization–is a milestone of macabre literature. This exclusive new edition, presents Lovecraft’s masterpiece in fully restored form, and includes his acclaimed scholarly essay “Supernatural Horror in Literature.” This is essential reading for every devotee of classic terror.

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