Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

A Short Stay in Hell de Steven L. Peck
Carregando...

A Short Stay in Hell (original: 2012; edição: 2012)

de Steven L. Peck (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
24316112,620 (4.15)4
Literary Criticism. Nonfiction. An ordinary family man, geologist, and Mormon, Soren Johansson has always believed he'll be reunited with his loved ones after death in an eternal hereafter. Then, he dies. Soren wakes to find himself cast by a God he has never heard of into a Hell whose dimensions he can barely grasp: a vast library he can only escape from by finding the book that contains the story of his life.In this haunting existential novella, author, philosopher, and ecologist Steven L. Peck explores a subversive vision of eternity, taking the reader on a journey through the afterlife of a world where everything everyone believed in turns out to be wrong."Profound and disturbing, A SHORT STAY IN HELL is a perfect blend of science fiction, theology, and horror. A terrifying meditation on faith, human nature, and the relentless scope of eternity. It will haunt you, fittingly, for a very, very long time." Dan Wells, author of I AM NOT A SERIAL KILLER"An irresistible invention. Peck has somehow squeezed all of human experience, not to mention near-infinite expanses of space and time, into one miraculously slim novella. You won't be able to stop thinking about this book." Ken Jennings, author of BRAINIAC and MAPHEAD.… (mais)
Membro:cpcode
Título:A Short Stay in Hell
Autores:Steven L. Peck (Autor)
Informação:Strange Violin Editions (2012), Edition: Firsttion ed., 108 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:**1/2
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Informações da Obra

A Short Stay in Hell de Steven L. Peck (2012)

Nenhum(a)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 4 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 16 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
More a thought experiment than a story, Steven L. Peck's A Short Stay in Hell takes the premise of Borges' famous story 'The Library of Babel' – a near-infinite library that contains not only every book that ever existed, but every book that ever could exist (including ones of complete gibberish) – and takes it to its logical end. Calculating that this would mean more books on shelves than there are electrons in the universe (pg. 92), Peck goes a great job of extrapolating what a 'Hell' composed of such a scenario would actually mean for one sentenced to it. The infinite totalitarian bleakness of Peck's novella is hard to describe, and genuinely terrifying.

What makes it more terrifying is its sheer capriciousness; those sentenced to this Hell do not know why they have, what they did wrong, nor does the task in front of them seem negotiable. (In order to escape this Hell, they must find the 'book of their life' from amongst the shelves and submit it.) On this front, A Short Stay in Hell is more of a mixed bag.

On one hand, the capriciousness of the task gives a sense of terrifying futility to their lot, a dose of stark existentialism that is daunting for the reader to ponder. However, the hastiness of some of the premise undercuts this and raises more questions than the short book can satisfactorily answer. A demon (yes, the sort with horns) glibly consigns people to this peculiar fate because they didn't follow the one true faith, but the implication that Zoroastrianism is the one truth faith means just about everyone who dies is consigned to Hell's torture by default and through no fault of their own. The task of finding the book is, by any reasonable measure, impossible; early on, it is noted that given the dimensions of the library even writing down the floor number it is on would be a longer number than the book could hold (pg. 2). It leads to a question, why would a God submit his people to this torture?

Of course, the idea of a capricious, or mad, or unfeeling God is in itself terrifying, particularly when such a God has sentenced you to an impossible eternal task that you cannot escape. But sometimes the questions raised by Peck's book felt like loopholes or oversights in the thought experiment, rather than implications, and that is before we even get onto some of the arbitrary particulars left unanswered (such as why everyone in this Hell is a white American – something remarked upon so often I assumed there would be a reason for it – or why they need food, or why the library resets every night).

I suppose the fact that the reader can be left alternately perplexed, frustrated or disturbed by the arbitrariness shows that Peck's Hell is working. Nevertheless, I had expected more resolution, or at least more in-depth consideration of the implications of Peck's world. Given the nature of the concept, I half-expected the 'solution' to be to submit any book – any of the gibberish on Hell's shelves – through the slot provided, because although each book was meaningless, so too was a life (from this existential perspective), and consequently a meaningless sequence of babble would be analogous to the 'story of your life'.

However, Peck leaves all of this on the table. The relentless questions that bobble up, futilely, might not be narratively satisfying, but the realisation that "we can't make a difference – all meaning has been subtracted" (pg. 65) is shown in its totality here. Peck has created a genuine Hell, one that shows the various hells that can be found in infinity, in belief, in time, in people, even in love. It's a profoundly disturbing, mind-destroying scenario, and one can only hope that if there is a god or power at work in the world, it is not cruel enough to create such a place. Peck's Hell is palatable only when safely ringfenced as fiction. ( )
  MikeFutcher | Jul 6, 2024 |
4.5
Holy shit this is the bleakest book I have ever read and it makes me immensely grateful that I’m not living it. Goddamn terrifying. Turns reading books into hell.

https://youtube.com/@ChanelChapters ( )
  spiritedstardust | Jun 1, 2024 |
A compelling and short riff on the concept of the Library of Babel as put forward by Borges. A library is (near) infinite and contains every variation of every written work. It's hell, which is not eternal. You can get out if you find the book containing your life experiences. Milleniums pass. Stuff gets bleak. ( )
  Amateria66 | May 24, 2024 |
This little novel has been stuck in my head (and my heart) for months now. It presents questions about the sense and scale of time and size that I still cannot wrap my head around. It's about being wrong, cosmically wrong, and having to accept it. It's about love, too. And loss. It made me think of my girl and if I ever show you this review, Bethany, I would look for you in the stacks. Forever. ( )
  Wordslinger1919 | Jun 21, 2023 |
How does one even describe this novella of only 100 pages? At first I found it somewhat tedious, but that only seems right considering the events in the story. Slowly, I found I couldn’t put it down. As a lover of books, I thought eternity in a library doesn’t sound like such a bad thing… until I learned the truth of those books. Then the truth of love found and lost, which seemed even greater punishment. A truer horror was the inevitability of some human natures. Though a simple idea, here, the author proves hell doesn’t have to contain hellfire to be torturous. A horror novel? No. And certainly not horrific. But insidiously horrifying. ( )
  SharonMariaBidwell | Nov 15, 2022 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 16 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico
LCC Canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

Literary Criticism. Nonfiction. An ordinary family man, geologist, and Mormon, Soren Johansson has always believed he'll be reunited with his loved ones after death in an eternal hereafter. Then, he dies. Soren wakes to find himself cast by a God he has never heard of into a Hell whose dimensions he can barely grasp: a vast library he can only escape from by finding the book that contains the story of his life.In this haunting existential novella, author, philosopher, and ecologist Steven L. Peck explores a subversive vision of eternity, taking the reader on a journey through the afterlife of a world where everything everyone believed in turns out to be wrong."Profound and disturbing, A SHORT STAY IN HELL is a perfect blend of science fiction, theology, and horror. A terrifying meditation on faith, human nature, and the relentless scope of eternity. It will haunt you, fittingly, for a very, very long time." Dan Wells, author of I AM NOT A SERIAL KILLER"An irresistible invention. Peck has somehow squeezed all of human experience, not to mention near-infinite expanses of space and time, into one miraculously slim novella. You won't be able to stop thinking about this book." Ken Jennings, author of BRAINIAC and MAPHEAD.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (4.15)
0.5
1
1.5
2 4
2.5 1
3 9
3.5 2
4 24
4.5 2
5 29

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 208,287,490 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível