Página inicialGruposDiscussãoExplorarZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

The Wandering Earth: Classic Science Fiction…
Carregando...

The Wandering Earth: Classic Science Fiction Collection (edição: 2013)

de Cixin Liu (Autor), Kim Fout (Editor), Verbena C. W. (Editor), Holger Nahm (Tradutor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
257782,229 (3.87)11
Welcome Page -- About The Wandering Earth -- Contents -- The Wandering Earth -- Chapter 1: The Reining Age -- Chapter 2: The Exodial Age -- Chapter 3: Rebellion -- Chapter 4: The Wandering Age -- Mountain -- Chapter 1: Where There's a Mountain -- Chapter 2: Words on the Mountaintop -- Chapter 3: Bubble World -- Chapter 4: Redshift -- Chapter 5: Gravity -- Chapter 6: World's Core -- Chapter 7: The War of the Strata -- Chapter 8: Under the Ocean -- Chapter 9: To the Stars -- Chapter 10: Of The Universality of Mountains -- Of Ants and Dinosaurs -- Preface -- Chapter 1: The Information Age Chapter 2: The Strike of the Ants -- Chapter 3: The Last War -- Chapter 4: Thunder Grains -- Chapter 5: Leviathan and Luna -- Chapter 6: The Destruction of the Dinosaur World -- Chapter 7: The Ultimate Deterrent -- Chapter 8: The Battle of the Signal Stations -- Chapter 9: The Long Night -- Sun of China -- Preface -- Chapter 1: First Goal in Life: Drink some water that is not bitter -- Make some money -- Chapter 2: Second Goal in Life: Go to the city with more lights and sweeter water -- Make more money -- Chapter 3: Third Goal in Life: Go to a bigger city -- See the bigger world Earn more money -- Chapter 4: Fourth Goal in Life: Become a Beijinger -- Chapter 5: Fifth Goal in Life: Fly to the China Sun and clean it -- Chapter 6: Mirror Farmers -- Chapter 7: Sixth Goal in Life: Sail the sea of stars -- Draw humanity's gaze back toward the deeps of space -- The Wages of Humanity -- Curse 5.0 -- The Micro-Age -- Chapter 1: Return -- Chapter 2: The Monument -- Chapter 3: The Capital -- Chapter 4: Micro-Humanity -- Chapter 5: The Banquet -- Chapter 6: Rebirth -- Devourer -- Chapter 1: The Crystal from Eridanus -- Chapter 2: Emissary Fangs -- Chapter 3: Ants Chapter 4: Acceleration -- Chapter 5: The Lunar Refuge -- Chapter 6: Planting the Bombs -- Chapter 7: Humanity's First and Last Space War -- Chapter 8: Epilogue: The Return -- Taking Care of Gods -- Chapter 1 -- Chapter 2 -- Chapter 3 -- Chapter 4 -- Chapter 5 -- Chapter 6 -- Chapter 7 -- Chapter 8 -- With Her Eyes -- Preface -- Chapter 1: The Taklamakan -- Chapter 2: Setting Sun VI -- Chapter 3: The World, Clear as Crystal -- The Longest Fall -- Preface -- Chapter 1: A New Solid State -- Chapter 2: Rude Awakening -- Chapter 3: The Antarctic Doorstep -- Chapter 4: The Gates of Hell Chapter 5: The Greatest Tunnel -- Chapter 6: Disasters and Catastrophes -- Chapter 7: The Death of Shen Yuan -- Chapter 8: Antarctica -- Epilogue: Earth Cannon -- Preview -- About Cixin Liu -- About The Three-Body Problem Series -- An Invitation from the Publisher -- Copyright Eleven short stories from China's greatest SF writer… (mais)
Membro:iaross
Título:The Wandering Earth: Classic Science Fiction Collection
Autores:Cixin Liu (Autor)
Outros autores:Kim Fout (Editor), Verbena C. W. (Editor), Holger Nahm (Tradutor)
Informação:CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (2013), Edition: 1, 482 pages
Coleções:Para ler
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Work Information

The Wandering Earth: Classic Science Fiction Collection de Cixin Liu (Author)

Nenhum(a)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 11 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 7 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
While Liu's grand hit, the Remembrance of Earth's Past, is on my wish-list, I've been reluctant to read it, as it appears to be heavy on the hard science. So, I went for this collection of short-stories, which is always an easier way to get to know an author's work. What also helped, was the fact that the Waterstones shop was selling it at half-price.

And one must not have read the aforementioned trilogy to enjoy or understand the stories in 'The Wandering Earth', which is of course good news. All of the stories are quite accessible, although I don't know if that's because of Liu's writing-style or the translators' way of working.

These ten stories were translated by various translators, not just the famous [a:Ken Liu|2917920|Ken Liu|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1400610835p2/2917920.jpg]. This too, aside from the themes (trans-humanism, religion, sociology, politics, re-inventing life on Earth, influence/impact of technology on daily life, ...), gives this collection a varied offering.

While there were really no bad stories, not all could convince me. However, the majority certainly was fine and more than fine, much recommended, even.

Even if you are reluctant to read Liu's novels, you can't go wrong with a short-story collection like this one here, which shows why Liu has won the China Galaxy Science Fiction Award so many times. Now that's I've read these stories, my interest in the aforementioned trilogy has increased. However, my TBR-pile is still huge enough, choices have to be made continuously.

Contents:
* The Wandering Earth
* Mountain
* Sun of China
* For the Benefit of Mankind
* Curse 5.0
* The Micro-Era
* Devourer
* Taking Care of God
* With Her Eyes
* Cannonball ( )
  TechThing | Jan 22, 2021 |
A set of sci-fi short stories by this Chinese author. Very interesting to look at the main tropes of classic sci-fi from a very different perspective. I particularly enjoyed Curse 5.0 and Cannonball. ( )
  sarahemmm | Aug 2, 2020 |
Cixin Liu’s The Wandering Earth collects ten short stories from the Hugo and Nebula Award winning author. The titular first story begins four hundred years in the future, where the world’s scientists have discovered that the sun will soon use up its supply of hydrogen and begin fusing helium, expanding into a red giant in the process. To save the planet, the nations of the world build massive engines to push Earth on a 2500-year journey to Alpha Centauri, the closest star system. Liu uses this premise to imagine how society would change if every human were motivated only to preserve the species on a generations-long perilous journey. The story was successful enough that Frant Gwo adapted it as a 2019 science fiction film, though Gwo primarily focused on Liu’s premise while telling his own story.

The second short story, “Mountain,” recalls the work of Arthur C. Clarke as Liu uses the encounter between a human and an alien intelligence to posit how a society of artificial lifeforms might arise and how both their society and their environment could differ from ours. In “Sun of China,” Liu explores the possibilities of space industry and how it both democratizes space travel and can improve conditions on Earth. Liu further shows that such business would make near-Earth orbit profitable, but a lack of inherent profit might dissuade human exploration further into the solar system. In an unfortunately dated moment, Liu portrays a centenarian Stephen Hawking retiring to near-Earth orbit, though events in the real world have outpaced Liu’s storytelling ability with Hawking recently dying aged seventy-six (pg. 139). Despite this, what Hawking represents to the story still makes an impact and the narrative offers a good legacy for the late scientist. “For the Benefit of Mankind” is a futuristic crime noir story set against the backdrop of a conquered Earth and social inequality.

In “Curse 5.0,” Cixin Liu tells a story set in the future about a computer virus run rampant in an increasingly-digitized world. In a particularly nice touch, he includes a lucky vagrant version of himself in the future. “The Micro-Era” recalls the best of pulp sci-fi with the last survivor on an ark ship returning to Earth thousands of years after a cataclysm only to discover that humanity has shrunk to microscopic level and lives in domed cities to survive the nearly-uninhabitable conditions. “Devourer” is another first contact story, with the appearance of a crystal seemingly portending destruction for the Earth. “Taking Care of God” focuses on the aliens who created humanity returning to ask for our care in their dotage. The twist is that the alien species looks like little old men with white beards and canes. In “With Her Eyes,” Liu tells the story of a pair of cybernetic eyes and their owner seeking to fulfill the wishes of the previous owner. Finally, “Cannonball” focuses on a man awakening from cryogenic sleep to find his world changed.

Liu’s writing closely resembles that of Asimov or Clarke, examining big ideas in the style of someone recounting momentous events. Like those authors, however, he relies extensively upon exposition, often to the detriment of fully-developed characters. His human characters exist mostly to forward the big ideas Liu wishes to explore. For those used to this style of science-fiction, he is a valuable addition to the genre. Newcomers or those more familiar with contemporary styles may find it alienating. ( )
  DarthDeverell | Apr 13, 2019 |
1. Die wandernde Erde (41 Seiten)

Wissenschaftler sagen voraus, dass die Sonne in das Stadium eines Roten Riesen übergehen wird. Die Menschheit setzt daraufhin alle Hebel in Bewegung, um die Erde von der Sonne wegzutransportieren. Zuerst halten sie die Erde an. Danach manövrieren sie sie auf eine Laufbahn um die Sonne, um die Erde stark genug zu beschleunigen, um der Anziehungskraft der Sonne entfliehen und unser Sonnensystem verlassen zu können. Beschrieben wird alles aus Sicht eines nicht näher benannten Ich-Erzählers, von seiner Kindheit bis ins hohe Alter. Die Menschen leben unterirdisch, besuchen die Oberfläche nur zu bestimmten Zeiten. Am Ende bringen sie ihre Anführer um, weil die angeblich das Sterben der Sonne falsch vorhergesagt haben, nur um dann doch Recht zu behalten. So richtig kann ich diese Geschichte nicht einordnen. Weder die Gesellschaft noch so richtig das Leben unter der Erdoberfläche werden wirklich näher beleuchtet. Alles wird nur so grob angerissen. Hm, ich bin eher enttäuscht.

2. Gipfelstürmer (37 Seiten)

Zwei Marinesoldaten unterhalten sich an Bord ihres Schiffes auf hoher See über Berge, als ein Alienraumschiff sich der Erde nähert und sich in einen synchronen Orbit einparkt. Seine Gravitation reißt ein Loch in die Atmosphäre und erzeugt auf dem Ozean eine riesige stillstehende Welle, die höher ist als der Mount Everest. Feng Fan, begeisterter Bergsteiger, beschließt von Bord zu gehen und diese Welle zu erklimmen. Oben angekommen nehmen die Aliens mit ihm Kontakt auf und erzählen ihm die Geschichte ihres Volkes. In dieser Erzählung spielt Liu mit vielen wissenschaftlichen Theorien, was das ganze eher anstrengend als unterhaltsam macht. So richtig hat sich mir der Sinn dieser Erzählung nicht erschlossen.

3. Das Ende der Kreidezeit (42 Seiten)

Das Ende der Kreidezeit erzählt die Geschichte vom Aussterben der Dinosaurier und gehört zur Kurzgeschichte Der Weltenzerstörer. Dabei entwickeln sich die Ameisen und die Dinosaurier in Symbiose und errichten eine gigantische Zivilisation. Während die Dinosaurier alles in großem Maßstabe erledigen, benötigen sie für die feineren Dinge die Hilfe der Ameisen. Am Ende beschließen die Ameisen jedoch in Streik zu treten, auf den die Dinosaurier mit Krieg reagieren und einige Ameisenstädte vernichten. Die Ameisen planen daraufhin die komplette Auslöschung aller Dinosaurier, ignorieren dabei aber die Wechselwirkungen ihrer Symbiose mit den Dinos und hören auch nicht auf warnende Stimmen. Es kommt wie es kommen muss und die Dinosaurier werden ausgelöscht während die große Zivilisation der Ameisen untergeht und sich zurückentwickelt. Diese Geschichte hat mir sehr gut gefallen. Auch wenn im Schlusswort zwei Ameisen darüber philosphieren, ob es jemals wieder eine Spezies geben wird, die sich so entwickeln wird wie die Dinosaurier, so sind die warnenden Worte in dieser Erzählung leider sehr sehr nahe an der Realität.

4. Die Sonne Chinas (40 Seiten)

Shuiwa, ein junger Mann kommt aus dem Dorf in die Großstadt. Er hat sein Dorf hinter sich gelassen, weil das Leben dort hart und voller Entbehrungen ist. Er schafft es bis nach Peking, wo er Fensterputzer für Wolkenkratzer wird. Gleichzeitig ist ein Freund, mit dem er nach Peking gekommen ist, Leiter eines Projekts namens Die Sonne Chinas, eine große Solarkonstruktion in einem geosynchronen Orbit, das durch Eingriffe in das Wetter in sehr trocknen Gebieten Chinas mehr Regen bringen soll. Da die Solarpanelfläche verschmutzt, soll Shuiwa zusammen mit seinen Kollegen ins Weltall fliegen und die Panels putzen. Es entbrandet eine riesige Diskussion darüber, dass einfache Menschen ohne einen Universitätsabschluss ins All fliegen sollen. Dabei ist es eben genau die praktische Erfahrung und die Anpassungsfähigkeit dieser Spinnenmenschen genannten Scheibenputzer, die sie für diese Arbeit qualifiziert. Und so fliegt Shuiwa ins All und von einem einfachen Bauernjungen werden er und seine Kollegen zu Ikonen einer neuen Ära.

Diese Geschichte hat mir sehr gut gefallen.

5. Um die Götter muss man sich kümmern (35 Seiten)

Zwei Milliarden Götter landen auf der Erde. Sie sind alt und gebrechlich und stehen kurz vorm Sterben. Sie haben in weiser Voraussicht um ihre eigene Sterblichkeit das Leben auf der Erde geschaffen, um hier ihre letzten Tage zu verbringen. Sie bieten ihr gesamtes Wissen und ihre gesamte Technologie im Austausch dafür, dass sie auf der Erde bleiben können. Jeder Gott bei einer Familie.

Diese Geschichte hat mich unsagbar berührt und dient als gute Fabel dafür, wie schlecht wir mit den alten Menschen unserer Gesellschaft umgehen. Wie wir sie als Last empfinden und sie respektlos behandeln. Kein echtes Scifi, aber eine schöne Erzählung, die zum Nachdenken anregt, auch wenn die Moral der Geschichte am Ende doch eine ganz andere ist.

6. Fluch 5.0 (23 Seiten)

Eine junge Frau programmiert einen Computervirus, den Fluch 1.0, um sich an einem Mann zu rächen. In der Geschichte geht es um die Evolution dieses Virus bis hin zur vollständigen Vernichtung der Menschheit. Parallel dazu folgen wir den scheiternden Karrieren der beiden Autoren Cixin Liu und Pan Dajiao (Pan Haitian?). Liu wird dabei als Hard-SF-Schreiberling bezeichnet, was ich persönlich nicht unbedingt nachvollziehen kann. Besonders nicht, wenn man die einzelnen Erzählungen dieses Bandes miteinander vergleicht. Die Warnung davor, die gesamte Menschheit zu vernetzen und zu sehr von Computern abhängig zu machen, wüsste ich wesentlich mehr zu schätzen, wäre die Geschichte nicht gespickt gewesen mit echt dämlichen frauenfeindlichen Kommentaren. Falls jemand meine Augäpfel findet, die hätte ich gern wieder. Die sind mir vor lauter Augenverdrehen rausgefallen.

7. Das Mikrozeitalter (26 Seiten)

Die Fortsetzung zur Geschichte Die wandernde Erde. Der Vorreiter kehrt als einziger Überlebender einer Raumschiffarche zur Erde zurück, wo mittlerweile 25000 Jahre vergangen sind. Ignorieren wir mal die Sache mit der Lichtgeschwindigkeit, so hat mir diese Geschichte echt gut gefallen. Die Idee, mit der Liu hier spielt hinsichtlich der Evolution der Menschheit zu intelligenten Mikroorganismen, denen es an nichts fehlt, fand ich echt gut. Bis jetzt die Erzählung im Buch, die mir am besten gefallen hat.

8. Weltenzerstörer (36 Seiten)

Der Weltenzerstörer wurde bereits letztes Jahr einzeln herausgegeben und von mir hier besprochen.

9. Die Versorgung der Menschheit (47 Seiten)

In dieser Erzählung werden die Ereignisse aus der Geschichte Um die Götter muss man sich kümmern fortgeführt. Der Leser folgt der Geschichte durch die Augen von Glattrohr, einem Auftragsmörder. Er wird von den 13 reichsten Menschen der Erde aufgefordert, drei der ärmsten Menschen zu töten. Dabei analysiert er die Auswirkungen der Kluft zwischen arm und reich. Hier ist sicherlich eine Fabel mit einer Warnung verborgen, aber so richtig erschlossen hat sich mir diese Geschichte nicht.

10. Durch die Erde zum Mond (40 Seiten)

Durch die Erde zum Mond gehört zur Kurzgeschichte Mit ihren Augen. Die Menschheit baut einen riesigen Tunnel von China in die Antarktis, nachdem sie einen neuen Festkörperzustand entdeckt hat. Diese Erzählung ist stark angelehnt an Jules Vernes Geschichte Von der Erde zum Mond, in welcher Menschen mit einer riesigen Kanone ins Weltall geschossen werden. Es liest sich ziemlich schräg, muss ich gestehen.

11. Mit ihren Augen (17 Seiten)

Ein Astronaut begibt sich für einen Kurzurlaub zur Erde. Dabei nimmt er eine sensorische Brille mit, die seine Eindrücke und Empfindungen an eine junge Frau weiterleitet, die nicht selbst auf der Erde sein kann. Die Geschichte ist recht philosophisch angehaut, allerdings bedient sich Liu hier des Manic Pixie Dream Girl in Form der jungen Frau, die dem männlichen Protagonisten die Augen öffnet für die Schönheiten der Welt und der einfachen Dinge. Selbst der Twist über die junge Frau konnte aus dieser kurzen Geschichte nichts besonderes machen, auch wenn es sich ganz nett liest.

Fazit:
Die wandernde Erde liefert 11 Erzählungen ganz unterschiedlicher Coleur von Cixin Liu. Ein Rezensent auf GoodReads schrieb in einem seiner Updates, dass er dieses Buch einfach unter dem Gesichtspunkt des Ultraunrealismus liest und dem muss ich beipflichten. Die Erzählungen sind ganz klar phantastisch, könnten aber kaum weiter von echter Science Fiction entfernt sein. Die einzelnen Erzählungen haben mir ganz unterschiedlich gefallen, wobei ich Das Mikrozeitalter besonders gut fand. Vielleicht fehlte mir bei der ein oder anderen Geschichte tatsächlich der Bezug zu Chinas Kultur. Leseempfehlung für Liu-Fans, aber eher nix für Menschen, die sich mit seinen anderen Werken eher schwer getan haben. ( )
  Powerschnute | Mar 21, 2019 |
I recently read Cixin Liu’s science fiction Three Body Problem trilogy, and was pretty much blown away. The second book in the series, The Dark Forest, may be the finest science fiction work I have ever read (and I’ve read hundreds). I was anxious to read more of his work and purchased this collection of short stories as soon as I found it.

This collection contains a few very good stories (Of Ants and Dinosaurs was magnificent), and several that were nothing to write home about. Overall, it was a good read, just not up to the level of the trilogy. ( )
  santhony | Aug 7, 2018 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 7 (seguinte | mostrar todas)

» Adicionar outros autores (19 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Liu, CixinAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Altayó, JavierTraductorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Martiniere, StephanArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
CDD/MDS canônico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

Welcome Page -- About The Wandering Earth -- Contents -- The Wandering Earth -- Chapter 1: The Reining Age -- Chapter 2: The Exodial Age -- Chapter 3: Rebellion -- Chapter 4: The Wandering Age -- Mountain -- Chapter 1: Where There's a Mountain -- Chapter 2: Words on the Mountaintop -- Chapter 3: Bubble World -- Chapter 4: Redshift -- Chapter 5: Gravity -- Chapter 6: World's Core -- Chapter 7: The War of the Strata -- Chapter 8: Under the Ocean -- Chapter 9: To the Stars -- Chapter 10: Of The Universality of Mountains -- Of Ants and Dinosaurs -- Preface -- Chapter 1: The Information Age Chapter 2: The Strike of the Ants -- Chapter 3: The Last War -- Chapter 4: Thunder Grains -- Chapter 5: Leviathan and Luna -- Chapter 6: The Destruction of the Dinosaur World -- Chapter 7: The Ultimate Deterrent -- Chapter 8: The Battle of the Signal Stations -- Chapter 9: The Long Night -- Sun of China -- Preface -- Chapter 1: First Goal in Life: Drink some water that is not bitter -- Make some money -- Chapter 2: Second Goal in Life: Go to the city with more lights and sweeter water -- Make more money -- Chapter 3: Third Goal in Life: Go to a bigger city -- See the bigger world Earn more money -- Chapter 4: Fourth Goal in Life: Become a Beijinger -- Chapter 5: Fifth Goal in Life: Fly to the China Sun and clean it -- Chapter 6: Mirror Farmers -- Chapter 7: Sixth Goal in Life: Sail the sea of stars -- Draw humanity's gaze back toward the deeps of space -- The Wages of Humanity -- Curse 5.0 -- The Micro-Age -- Chapter 1: Return -- Chapter 2: The Monument -- Chapter 3: The Capital -- Chapter 4: Micro-Humanity -- Chapter 5: The Banquet -- Chapter 6: Rebirth -- Devourer -- Chapter 1: The Crystal from Eridanus -- Chapter 2: Emissary Fangs -- Chapter 3: Ants Chapter 4: Acceleration -- Chapter 5: The Lunar Refuge -- Chapter 6: Planting the Bombs -- Chapter 7: Humanity's First and Last Space War -- Chapter 8: Epilogue: The Return -- Taking Care of Gods -- Chapter 1 -- Chapter 2 -- Chapter 3 -- Chapter 4 -- Chapter 5 -- Chapter 6 -- Chapter 7 -- Chapter 8 -- With Her Eyes -- Preface -- Chapter 1: The Taklamakan -- Chapter 2: Setting Sun VI -- Chapter 3: The World, Clear as Crystal -- The Longest Fall -- Preface -- Chapter 1: A New Solid State -- Chapter 2: Rude Awakening -- Chapter 3: The Antarctic Doorstep -- Chapter 4: The Gates of Hell Chapter 5: The Greatest Tunnel -- Chapter 6: Disasters and Catastrophes -- Chapter 7: The Death of Shen Yuan -- Chapter 8: Antarctica -- Epilogue: Earth Cannon -- Preview -- About Cixin Liu -- About The Three-Body Problem Series -- An Invitation from the Publisher -- Copyright Eleven short stories from China's greatest SF writer

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (3.87)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 3
2.5 1
3 7
3.5 6
4 21
4.5 4
5 11

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 164,478,790 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível