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Across that bridge : a vision for change and…
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Across that bridge : a vision for change and the future of America (edição: 2017)

de John Lewis

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11810178,689 (4.56)3
Winner of the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work/Biography. In Across That Bridge, Congressman John Lewis draws from his experience as a prominent leader of the Civil Rights Movement to offer timeless wisdom, poignant recollections, and powerful principles for anyone interested in challenging injustices and inspiring real change toward a freer, more peaceful society. The Civil Rights Movement gave rise to the protest culture we know today, and the experiences of leaders like Congressman Lewis, a close confidant to Martin Luther King, Jr., have never been more relevant. Despite more than forty arrests, physical attacks, and serious injuries, John Lewis has remained a devoted advocate of the discipline and philosophy of nonviolence. Now, in an era in which the protest culture he helped forge has resurfaced as a force for change, Lewis' insights have never been more relevant. In this heartfelt book, Lewis explores the contributions that each generation must make to achieve change.… (mais)
Membro:First-Church-Akron
Título:Across that bridge : a vision for change and the future of America
Autores:John Lewis
Informação:New York : Hachette Books, 2017.
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Across That Bridge: A Vision for Change and the Future of America de John Lewis

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This is a very inspiring book. If you are at all interested in why the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960's worked, and how you can leverage the lessons learned there to make your own activism work, this is really a book you need to read.

For myself, I appreciated it as much for the history lesson as the inspiration. There was so much that was glossed over in school, and it was really great to get an insider's view of what was going on during that time. ( )
  ca.bookwyrm | Feb 15, 2021 |
I was astounded by John Lewis’ patience, faith, and perseverance despite every hurdle you can imagine. My favorite parts were when he shared about his personal experiences. Much of what he said was general advice, but his memories of walking the bridge, interacting with a man who had beaten him and later apologized, hearing King’s speeches for the first time, were the most powerful for me.

“It is only through examining history that you become aware of where you stand within the continuum of change.”

“The human heart is the most important frontier to conquer in the struggle for human dignity.” ( )
  bookworm12 | Feb 2, 2021 |
Across That Bridge: A Vision for Change and the Future of America by John Lewis is such an impressive book, it’s the book you would expect a man with the integrity and strength of John Lewis to have written. He did it with his communications director, Brenda Jones, who he always praised highly. His chapter headings are Faith, Patience, Study, Truth, Act, Peace, Love, and Reconciliation. He expanded on these themes beautifully.

He mentioned his early practice of preaching to the chickens—the story that everyone loves to pass on—but he also wrote about hiding under the porch until the last minute, and then running to catch the school bus, all to avoid picking cotton and other crops with his family. It was more than a kid skipping out on farm work, John Lewis was sure from an early age that education was the key to his future. Though his parents weren’t happy with him not helping them, how could they punish a boy driven to learn?

His writing in this book is very honest and human, and it showed so clearly how his belief in love and nonviolence burned brightly in him. His belief in religion and his fellow man’s inner goodness drove him all through his life of giving and service. The story of his life was one of bravery, but those chapter titles are more than just words at the head of a book’s chapters, they define this man, as he tried to pass on some of his knowledge.

The book includes the story of a man who came to John 48 years after he had severely beaten John and a fellow Freedom Rider bloody and broken in Rock Hill, South Carolina, back in 1961. When he told John that he was sorry and asked for forgiveness, every person who knows anything about John Lewis, knew his answer that day. It hard to even comprehend nowadays just what John Lewis and so many others went through in their long, long nonviolent struggle. Just the term, nonviolent struggle, seems like such a strange term to use to describe a struggle that saw some die, and countless other savagely beaten. But it was only one side that ever used any violence, because nonviolence demands so much from its practitioners, no matter how vicious someone hurts you, your self-discipline never allows you to strike back.

He wrote how much planning the movement leaders did to strategize, raise funds, coordinate so many different people, speak with the press, coordinate and organize with other groups and organizations, because it was never simply about hopping on a bus or marching somewhere. Lewis is a humble and kind man, but never mistake that for a weakness, his strength of character and belief humbled most who knew him, and eventually impressed even some who opposed him.

He spoke of later walking the corridors of power in Washington with the congresspeople who would sometimes vehemently oppose him on legislation, but John always had a ready “Hi, brother,” or “Hi, sister,” and a kind word for them.

Throughout the book he speaks of the admiration he held for the giants of the American Civil Rights movement, as well as those from other nonviolent movements in the world. He wasn’t simply dropping names when he quoted and thanked those he worked closely beside of, or those who he revered distantly. The quotes from people such as: Martin Luther King Jr., James Lawson, Robert Kennedy, Nelson Mandela, Mohandas Gandhi, Mother Teresa, Buddha, Pema Chödrön, Thoreau, and some African proverbs are throughout the book—and these words and people aptly defined his life.

This book originally came out in 2012 and though Jon Meacham’s large book on John, His Truth Is Marching On: John Lewis and the Power of Hope, has just been released (a book I’m sure to be reading soon), all readers with any interest in John Lewis should treat themselves with this inspiring book of the man’s own words. I’m not the kind of person who uses the word inspiring often, but it’s the absolutely perfect word to describe this book and its author. If I could, I would write the man a letter of thanks. Humble people of this importance don’t often walk this planet. Inspiring. ( )
  jphamilton | Aug 30, 2020 |
Library ( )
  LindaFSHemp | Aug 8, 2020 |
Across That Bridge - John Lewis
Audio performance by Keith David
5 stars

“ Even I, who has looked down the barrel of a gun with only my faith to defend me, would say there is a unique hostility in these times that almost seems worse to me than what we experienced in the 1960s.”

History, sermon, inspiration. This was easily the best 5 and a half listening hours that I’ve spent in a long time. Despite that pessimistic comment from the book’s introduction, the overall message was hopeful. There were no platitudes. Lewis is realistic and practical in his beliefs and his advice. I’m grateful and humbled. ( )
  msjudy | Aug 1, 2020 |
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Winner of the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work/Biography. In Across That Bridge, Congressman John Lewis draws from his experience as a prominent leader of the Civil Rights Movement to offer timeless wisdom, poignant recollections, and powerful principles for anyone interested in challenging injustices and inspiring real change toward a freer, more peaceful society. The Civil Rights Movement gave rise to the protest culture we know today, and the experiences of leaders like Congressman Lewis, a close confidant to Martin Luther King, Jr., have never been more relevant. Despite more than forty arrests, physical attacks, and serious injuries, John Lewis has remained a devoted advocate of the discipline and philosophy of nonviolence. Now, in an era in which the protest culture he helped forge has resurfaced as a force for change, Lewis' insights have never been more relevant. In this heartfelt book, Lewis explores the contributions that each generation must make to achieve change.

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