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The Blind Giant: Being Human in a Digital World

de Nick Harkaway

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The digital age. An age of isolation, warped communication, disintegrating community. Where unfiltered and unregulated information pours relentlessly into our lives, destroying what it means to be human. Or an age of marvels. Where there is a world of wonder at our fingertips.
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A very interesting examination of how our dependence on computers and social media is changing society. Harkaway is ultimately optimistic about the effects of technology on society, although I think he has a little too much faith in humanity's ability to make good choices. This was a very interesting read, full of good food for thought, and it will be interesting to read it again in a few years and see how his predictions have played out. ( )
  Gwendydd | Apr 16, 2013 |
This is a measured and intelligent observation of computer technology and the effect it is having on all of us. As a writer of fiction, he is also savvy to temptation to fall for 'techo-doom' or 'techo-utopian' narratives. Food for thought. ( )
  xander_paul | Jan 24, 2013 |
The Blind Giant is Nick Harkaway’s first non-fiction book and it is one of the most thought provoking books I have ever read. As its title suggests it deals with the impact of digital technology on humans, both as individuals and groups of all sizes, couples, families, communities, nations, and beyond. It also discusses the choices open to us and makes the point that we are not innocents adrift in a sea of technology, but that we are complicit in the negative consequences of everything we allow to happen. This includes wars in Africa where armed groups clash for control of the mines producing minerals that are essential for the production of virtually all the mobile devices we take for granted in our everyday lives.

But this is no cold treatise containing a lifeless analysis of the mechanics of how modern technology, specifically the Internet, affects us all. It is a hearth-side conversation, probably with a pint of ale to hand, ranging in subject matter from the immediacy of on-line shopping to the toppling of governments in the Middle East.

The book is very up-to-date with inclusion of the social issues surrounding the London riots of 2011 and the Arab Spring that swept away governments in the Middle East, and the role played by the Internet in facilitating both the initiation of these events and the subsequent recovery and stabilization.

Harkaway is inviting debate. In his conversational style he lays out his views and concerns on the disappearance of traditional work rolls and the unintentional consequences of the large, new corporations of the digital age that promote good intentions but, due to their size and reliance on old financial structures, end up doing damage they never intended.

A website has been provided (www.blindgiant.co.uk) for readers to enter into a conversation on the subject matter of each chapter. This is an example of the new immediacy Harkaway demonstrates the Internet has enabled. It is an attempt to encourage debate on the decisions we need to make to minimise the unintentional consequences of not making conscious decisions on how we wish to use the new Internet technology.

This book’s breadth of scope is vast and it deserves to be read, considered, and responded to. If you use the Internet, if you have a smart phone, if you buy things on-line, you have a duty to read this book and enter into the debate on how society should use our new toys so that they don’t destroy the lives of those around us, and then our own. ( )
3 vote pgmcc | Aug 1, 2012 |
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The digital age. An age of isolation, warped communication, disintegrating community. Where unfiltered and unregulated information pours relentlessly into our lives, destroying what it means to be human. Or an age of marvels. Where there is a world of wonder at our fingertips.

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