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Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the…
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Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet (original: 2012; edição: 2013)

de Andrew Blum (Autor)

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5061737,373 (3.36)9
When your Internet cable leaves your living room, where does it go? Almost everything about our day-to-day lives--and the broader scheme of human culture--can be found on the Internet. But what is it physically? And where is it really? Our mental map of the network is as blank as the map of the ocean that Columbus carried on his first Atlantic voyage. The Internet, its material nuts and bolts, is an unexplored territory. Until now. In Tubes, journalist Andrew Blum goes inside the Internet's physical infrastructure and flips on the lights, revealing an utterly fresh look at the online world we think we know. It is a shockingly tactile realm of unmarked compounds, populated by a special caste of engineer who pieces together our networks by hand; where glass fibers pulse with light and creaky telegraph buildings, tortuously rewired, become communication hubs once again. From the room in Los Angeles where the Internet first flickered to life to the caverns beneath Manhattan where new fiber-optic cable is buried; from the coast of Portugal, where a ten-thousand-mile undersea cable just two thumbs wide connects Europe and Africa, to the wilds of the Pacific Northwest, where Google, Microsoft, and Facebook have built monumental data centers--Blum chronicles the dramatic story of the Internet's development, explains how it all works, and takes the first-ever in-depth look inside its hidden monuments. This is a book about real places on the map: their sounds and smells, their storied pasts, their physical details, and the people who live there. For all the talk of the "placelessness" of our digital age, the Internet is as fixed in real, physical spaces as the railroad or telephone. You can map it and touch it, and you can visit it. Is the Internet in fact "a series of tubes" as Ted Stevens, the late senator from Alaska, once famously described it? How can we know the Internet's possibilities if we don't know its parts? Like Tracy Kidder's classic The Soul of a New Machine or Tom Vanderbilt's recent bestseller Traffic, Tubes combines on-the-ground reporting and lucid explanation into an engaging, mind-bending narrative to help us understand the physical world that underlies our digital lives.… (mais)
Membro:eraskin
Título:Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet
Autores:Andrew Blum (Autor)
Informação:Ecco (2013), Edition: Reprint, 304 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:2021

Detalhes da Obra

Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet de Andrew Blum (2012)

  1. 00
    The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA from 9/11 to the Eavesdropping on America de James Bamford (Grant_Floyd)
    Grant_Floyd: Read in context of Snowden revelations to understand simple structure of internet connections in key locations that would be tapped by NSA, following on to read Shadow Factory by James Bamford: central mountain location of data centres, internet exchange near Washington, transatlantic cable, Palo Alto IX, Dutch and German differing approaches but both open vs data centre approach, lack of different cables down the coast of Africa, and some history about the original message exchange server… (mais)
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Mostrando 1-5 de 17 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
An enlightening book about the physical reality behind the Internet. The book was slighter than it had to be, padding a relatively small number of revelations with anecdotes and a travelogue. But it's accessible, interesting and a brisk read. ( )
  dhmontgomery | Dec 13, 2020 |
A little dry at times but a fascinating idea and the author did a lot of research and went all over the world looking for the Internet. “To look for the Internet, I had gotten off the Internet. I had stepped away from my keyboard to look around and talk.” ( )
  dmturner | Jun 29, 2020 |
Andrew Blum is a journalist who wonders about the physical reality of the internet: How does his computer connect to the net? Where do the cables go to? How do they join up? Where are all the data centers? What pathway do the data packets take, and what does that look like on maps of the US and the world?

Blum decides to travel around the US and Europe to talk to experts at various levels of complexity: the ISP centre, Internet Exchanges, and data centres belonging to Google and Facebook. Most of the facilities consist of drab, anonymous-looking box-buildings in out-of-the-way places. He is present when an underwater cable coming from West Africa is connected to one in Portugal; he also visits the location where a transatlantic cable arrives in Cornwall.

This was interesting: Blum does a good job of leading us through his journey of discovery. What I didn’t like was his tendency to inject too much drama and pathos into his writings: he likes to draw conclusions that, when written up in the style of, say, the Time Magazine or Vanity Fair, spiral into Anthopology and Large-Scale Societal Impact Of Things. Several of his musings on those topics are fairly pedestrian, but the overwrought way he presents them makes them seem hollow sometimes. ( )
  Petroglyph | Jan 2, 2020 |
A digerati travelogue, from an author who seems as much sociologist as infrastructure geek. Worth the read, even if you think you know the topic. ( )
  jamesb | May 20, 2019 |
The author's internet connection is interrupted when a squirrely gnaws through the wires leading into his house. This Proustian moment leads him to realize that the internet actually has a physical side to it and not just a virtual side. He sets out to investigate all of the physical aspects from cabling to data centers.

Even for people who know a lot about data centers can gain from this book because it really shows how everything is connected together. ( )
  M_Clark | Feb 28, 2016 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 17 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
[This] quixotic and winning book is an attempt to comprehend the physical realities of the Internet, to describe how this seemingly intangible thing is actually constructed.
adicionado por timtom | editarThe New York Times, Dwight Garner (Jun 19, 2012)
 
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When your Internet cable leaves your living room, where does it go? Almost everything about our day-to-day lives--and the broader scheme of human culture--can be found on the Internet. But what is it physically? And where is it really? Our mental map of the network is as blank as the map of the ocean that Columbus carried on his first Atlantic voyage. The Internet, its material nuts and bolts, is an unexplored territory. Until now. In Tubes, journalist Andrew Blum goes inside the Internet's physical infrastructure and flips on the lights, revealing an utterly fresh look at the online world we think we know. It is a shockingly tactile realm of unmarked compounds, populated by a special caste of engineer who pieces together our networks by hand; where glass fibers pulse with light and creaky telegraph buildings, tortuously rewired, become communication hubs once again. From the room in Los Angeles where the Internet first flickered to life to the caverns beneath Manhattan where new fiber-optic cable is buried; from the coast of Portugal, where a ten-thousand-mile undersea cable just two thumbs wide connects Europe and Africa, to the wilds of the Pacific Northwest, where Google, Microsoft, and Facebook have built monumental data centers--Blum chronicles the dramatic story of the Internet's development, explains how it all works, and takes the first-ever in-depth look inside its hidden monuments. This is a book about real places on the map: their sounds and smells, their storied pasts, their physical details, and the people who live there. For all the talk of the "placelessness" of our digital age, the Internet is as fixed in real, physical spaces as the railroad or telephone. You can map it and touch it, and you can visit it. Is the Internet in fact "a series of tubes" as Ted Stevens, the late senator from Alaska, once famously described it? How can we know the Internet's possibilities if we don't know its parts? Like Tracy Kidder's classic The Soul of a New Machine or Tom Vanderbilt's recent bestseller Traffic, Tubes combines on-the-ground reporting and lucid explanation into an engaging, mind-bending narrative to help us understand the physical world that underlies our digital lives.

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Edições: 014104909X, 0670918989

 

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