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We're with Nobody: Two Insiders Reveal…
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We're with Nobody: Two Insiders Reveal the Dark Side of American… (edição: 2012)

de Alan Huffman, Michael Rejebian

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424484,645 (2.72)Nenhum(a)
We're With Nobody is a thrilling, eye-opening insider's view of a little-known facet of the political campaign process: the multi-million dollar opposition research industry, or "oppo" as it's called.  For sixteen years authors Alan Huffman and Michael Rejebian have been digging up dirt on political candidates across the country, from presidential appointees to local school board hopefuls. We're With Nobody is a fascinating, riveting, sometimes funny, sometimes shocking look at the unseen side of political campaigning--a remarkable chronicle of a year in the life of two guys on a dedicated hunt to uncover the buried truths that every American voter has a right to know.… (mais)
Membro:James_Shelon32
Título:We're with Nobody: Two Insiders Reveal the Dark Side of American Politics
Autores:Alan Huffman
Outros autores:Michael Rejebian
Informação:William Morrow Paperbacks (2012), Edition: Original, Paperback, 208 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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We're with Nobody: Two Insiders Reveal the Dark Side of American Politics de Alan Huffman

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I rarely read non-fiction but I heard these guys on NPR and was intrigued so I bought the book. It was really interesting. Opposition research is often referenced but rarely discussed and I'd never heard it explained with such detail. I was once a speech writer. It's a special job. You either loved it or hated it. I loved it. Opposition research seems much the same way. These guys love it so you get a special window to see how it works. ( )
  susandennis | Jun 5, 2020 |
Very interesting topic. I really wanted to like this book, and I did at first, but then it became a bit too repetitive for me. Loved the term "dazzled camouflage", though. ( )
  parloteo | Dec 21, 2019 |
I really wanted to like this book. Opposition research isn't about hiding behind trench coats and finding that silver bullet that brings down the opposing (or your own!) candidate. It's a lot of hard work in dirty basements, slogging through piles of papers, dealing with cranky employees and lots of research.

I think they captured that aspect really well--that it's not about being sneaky and it's rare to get a thing like the 400 John Edwards haircut or a George Allen "macaca" quote. It's about creating connections and seeing patterns. But I thought it was quite tedious of a read. They basically tell the same story over and over again, of long hours, bad food and uncooperative clients/candidates/government employees, etc.

There were some helpful tips on how to approach unhelpful sources, but without names or connections, this was a boring read. It could have been the city council woman of some small place in the Midwest or a Senator from New York. Any personal information would have been helpful, although I guess they were hindered by client privacy. Still, I've known oppo researchers who have discussed some of their previous clients' work, so overall this was a disappointment. ( )
  HoldMyBook | Feb 11, 2018 |
Written by two journalists-turned-political-opposition researchers, Alan Huffman and Michael Rejebian, the book recounts their work digging up information on politicians, from US Senate hopefuls to local school board candidates.

The men tell their story in alternate chapters, but the gist of it is that they travel to local government offices to gather information that is supposed to be available to anyone who asks, i.e. voting records, tax records, court documents, etc. One big take-away from this book is that people who work in these government offices are frequently reluctant to share this information, even though it is their job to do so.

Time after time, the researchers have to cajole, flatter, and sometimes get indignant to get the information they need. The first question that is usually asked of them is "Who are you with?", thus leading to the title of the book. Their answer, more often than not, is "none of your business."

The government employees often stall, and the researchers have been followed back to their hotel and verbally threatened to go "back where they came from." This book reinforces the often-held opinion that government employees are uncooperative.

The men state that they are "guided, more or less, by the conviction that no one is fit to lead unless proven otherwise." They see themselves as "seekers of the truth." They believe that discovering the truth is"more crucial than ever, when today's news is prone to distortion, willful ignorance and lies."

I loved this quote: "Truth is a word that should never be qualified. It's like pregnancy; it's yes or no", and they quote Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan who supposedly said "everyone is entitled to his own opinions, but not his facts." Amen to that!

One of the more interesting incidents happened when they talked to the ex-wife of a candidate they were researching. They were looking about information about his business dealings, of which she had none. In the course of conversation, she complained that he never took her anywhere, but he takes his new girlfriend everywhere, and that he was arrested for beating the girlfriend up in an airport.

That piece of information might be useful. She said it happened on vacation, so Michael found out where they vacationed, pulled out a map, checked possible routes, and proceeded to call airports to ask about arrest reports. After many, many phone calls, he finds the report.

That information is passed along to a friend of the man, who takes the report to the candidate and shows it to him. The candidate withdrew from the running.

The men say that finding information on politicians, such as who donated to the campaigns, and who benefits from their votes is important. They state "the same type of systemic abuse that results in poorly built sidewalks in an out-of-the-way township resulted in the failed federal response to Hurricane Katrina." I'm not sure I totally buy that, but it is something to ponder.

They don't name names, although the reader is able to figure out that they did research on US Senate hopeful Christine O'Donnell and Sarah Palin.

Political junkies will enjoy this fascinating look at a part of the political process that is usually done under the cover of darkness, and has been done since the time of Caesar. The subject is interesting and timely in this election year, and you will look at political ads in a different light after reading this book. ( )
  bookchickdi | Apr 26, 2012 |
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We're With Nobody is a thrilling, eye-opening insider's view of a little-known facet of the political campaign process: the multi-million dollar opposition research industry, or "oppo" as it's called.  For sixteen years authors Alan Huffman and Michael Rejebian have been digging up dirt on political candidates across the country, from presidential appointees to local school board hopefuls. We're With Nobody is a fascinating, riveting, sometimes funny, sometimes shocking look at the unseen side of political campaigning--a remarkable chronicle of a year in the life of two guys on a dedicated hunt to uncover the buried truths that every American voter has a right to know.

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