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Hum And The Shiver (Tufa Novels) de Alex…
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Hum And The Shiver (Tufa Novels) (original: 2011; edição: 2011)

de Alex Bledsoe (Autor)

Séries: Tufa (1)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
4483843,204 (3.83)21
"No one knows where the Tufa came from, or how they ended up in the mountains of East Tennessee. When the first Europeans came to the Smoky Mountains, the Tufa were already there. Dark-haired and enigmatic, they live quietly in the hills and valleys of Cloud County, their origins lost to history. But there are clues in their music, hidden in the songs they have passed down for generations. . . . Private Bronwyn Hyatt, a true daughter of the Tufa, has returned from Iraq, wounded in body and spirit, but her troubles are far from over. Cryptic omens warn of impending tragedy, while a restless "haint" has followed her home from the war. Worse yet, Bronwyn has lost touch with herself and with the music that was once a part of her. With death stalking her family, will she ever again join in the song of her people, and let it lift her onto the night winds? "--… (mais)
Membro:MakamuFW
Título:Hum And The Shiver (Tufa Novels)
Autores:Alex Bledsoe (Autor)
Informação:Tor Trade (2011), Edition: First, 349 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:to-read

Detalhes da Obra

The Hum and the Shiver de Alex Bledsoe (2011)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 38 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
The thought passed my mind as I began to read this story, that maybe I had picked up a sequel. However, the story took off, and the that idea quickly disappeared. Bledsoe did a wonderful job in building up a character that is easy to relate to (even if I am not a female). I really enjoyed the story concept (don't want to give spoilers). After finishing, I do wonder about the need for some characters, as I didn't see, or recall at least, their importance in the story itself. But I see that there is another book to follow this one, and perhaps Bledsoe introduced them here, to help build them up for a portion that is in the next book. Either way I enjoyed reading this one, and read it straight through in one afternoon. Looking forward to the next one! ( )
  Ralphd00d | May 4, 2021 |
Bronwyn Hyatt is coming home. A war hero. Or so some people say, others say she hasn’t changed a speck from the trash Tufa slut she was before she left, but to her family all that is important is that she is home. Back among the Tufa. And who are the Tufa? Well that no on seems quite sure of. They’ve been in the mountains of east Tennessee since before anyone can remember. Closely knit, and prizing musical ability, they live apart from other people. And Bronwyn is a true, pure-blooded Tufa, a First Daughter. But a haint is visiting, and there are ominus signs everywhere her people look.

hum and the shiverFirst off I really enjoyed parts of this book. It is well told and it certainly kept my interest. My usual 5 minutes read before heading to work this morning was a little longer than planned because I got so engrossed in the story. But that doesn’t mean it was all positive. I had a slight issue with the idea of “pure-blood” and with the separate roles for men and women within Tufa society. Actually thats a bad way of putting it, but saying that such and such was a woman’s song, whereas a different one was a man’s didn’t sit well with me. However at the same time it was clearly a cultural thing, as was the importance of blood-lines. And even that part of it was being questioned by characters in the book. So points for that :)

I liked Bronwyn as a character, I’m not sure I got her all the time, but that’s okay. I got enough of her to not get too annoyed at her mistakes. The rest of the family is less well drawn than she is, but there are other characters there. The pastor in particular I thought was a good character. All too often in fiction being religious is short-hand for being crazy. That isn’t the case here, which is nice :)

This is a very different book from the previous ones I’d read by Bledsoe, but is shared some aspects. Easy to read, engaging, and with plenty of humour.

It also has the feel of a book in a series, well a ‘verse more likely I think. And I’d be interested in reading more if that were the case. ( )
  Fence | Jan 5, 2021 |
I started out reading this book forgetting what it was originally about, just that it was vaguely in the fantasy genre. Few books these days can captivate me and keep me reading and wanting to know more. It seems like most fantasy books draw on the same sort of mythos and magical creatures as so many others. It was quite refreshing to find a unique setting, backstory, and mysterious group that kept me guessing about what they are. The gradual roll-out of the history and who the Tufa people took some getting used to, but I think it was worth sticking through and letting it be revealed in due time. It was not a flashy fantasy with crazy things going on at a huge, fast pace. Instead, it had mundane aspects of life mixed with the mystery of the people, which I think adds to the charm of this book.

This ended up being my first book in what I came to find out is a genre called "Urban Fantasy." I look forward to exploring this genre further and will in due time give the other books in this series a read. ( )
  kritoke | Dec 13, 2020 |
Story about Bronwyn Hyatt, a Tufa woman who comes back to her home town from the Iraq war as a wouded hero. She must come to terms with her wild past and her place in a fairly closed society of human/fairy Tufas.
  JohnLavik | Mar 29, 2020 |
To read more in this series and others, check out keikii eats books!

95 points/100 (5/5 stars!)
Alert: Gushing Incoming

Former wild child Bronwyn Hyatt is returning from Iraq a hero, a bit more broken than she was before she left. But, she doesn't feel like a hero, she feels lost. Since she returned, death omens have been stalking her family, and with her hurt and broken, she has to heal quickly because she refuses to let it happen.

This. was. amazing! Oh my god, guys. How have I never read this before? Heck, I didn't even hear about it until late last year! Someone really needed to tell me about this sooner. I'm actually angry no one told me this existed sooner.

It has been no secret that I love fae. Bledsoe has such an amazing take on them! At first, I wasn't quite certain if they're fae or something he made up entirely new for this series. It is left a bit ambiguous because of the way the story reveals itself. I absolutely love the way they are built. They are mysterious, even to themselves sometimes. Even by the of the book, we don't even know anything close to everything about the Tufa.

Alex Bledsoe manages to take me back to a time right after 9/11, when the military and its soldiers were right in the public conscious and when they came home it was a big deal. I had to double check when it came out, because I thought it could have been 2005, not 2011. Even though they aren't that distant in time, it still manages to catch the fervor of that time.

Bronwyn doesn't feel like a hero, still. She likely never will. She still feels like the wild child she was. It doesn't help that she doesn't exactly remember the events they call her a hero for. She knows what happened, but she doesn't remember. She is torn up inside because of everything, the expectations of others, and the fact she never really wanted to come back.

There are a lot of plots that are connected together in The Hum and the Shiver, though. The main plot is about Bronwyn as well as the death omens. Bronwyn finding out who she is again is a minor but vital part to this book. The death omen plot is scary and depressing. There is also the story of Don Swayback, who is finding his Tufa heritage. It is interesting, and it manages to give a way for Bledsoe to introduce the fae from a more outsider perspective, since Bronwyn already knows, and the third character that I'm about to mention can't really know. The last is a newly appointed methodist minister, Craig Chess, who was sent to the area that try and convert the area. Craig is a great character, with a very strong sense of how he wants to present himself to the world with his calling. All of this unfolds piece by piece, layer by layer, to create a magical whole.

This is a blending of magic and music and religion. The book runs off magic and music. The magic is a mystery, we don't know what it can do or how (yet). The music is a calling. Every Tufa hears the music, lives the music. It is beautiful, even if the music doesn't call to me. The religion is new to the Tufa, and it isn't really their way. Yet, it is a part of Craig, and he wants it to be a part of the Tufa. They aren't derisive about it, it just isn't a part of their traditions. It is an interesting blend of the three.

The ending made this. As much as I want more, it is because I always want more. I loved Bronwyn and Craig, I even liked Don by the end. Yet, it still ends at a great place. This isn't a light, fun story. It is heavy and thrilling and just plain odd, and the end reflects that.

Audiobook Update: If you're looking for a new audiobook with a great story and a wonderful set of narrators, this is it! The Hum and the Shiver features two narrators who do the job perfectly. ( )
  keikii | Jan 23, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 38 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Now we return to the world of the Tufa in Bledsoe’s Wisp of a Thing, and the mysteries revealed in The Hum and the Shiver deepen more as we’re drawn further into life of the tiny town of Needsville—an ironic name, given that the town neither needs nor wants anything from outside itself. Within is another matter.
adicionado por legallypuzzled | editarTor.com, Suzanne Johnson (Web site pago) (Jun 17, 2013)
 

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Alex Bledsoeautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Card, Emily JaniceNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Rudnicki, StefanNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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"No one knows where the Tufa came from, or how they ended up in the mountains of East Tennessee. When the first Europeans came to the Smoky Mountains, the Tufa were already there. Dark-haired and enigmatic, they live quietly in the hills and valleys of Cloud County, their origins lost to history. But there are clues in their music, hidden in the songs they have passed down for generations. . . . Private Bronwyn Hyatt, a true daughter of the Tufa, has returned from Iraq, wounded in body and spirit, but her troubles are far from over. Cryptic omens warn of impending tragedy, while a restless "haint" has followed her home from the war. Worse yet, Bronwyn has lost touch with herself and with the music that was once a part of her. With death stalking her family, will she ever again join in the song of her people, and let it lift her onto the night winds? "--

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813.6 — Literature English (North America) American fiction 21st Century

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