Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

A Stolen Life: A Memoir (2012)

de Jaycee Dugard

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
2,2101367,257 (3.77)53
The memoir of Jaycee Dugard who was kidnapped on June 10, 1991, when she was 11 years old, and was missing for over 18 years before her reappearance in 2009.
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 53 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 136 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Jaycee Dugard is a remarkable young woman, a survivor who has come through an unthinkable ordeal and maintained a positive spirit. She's also writing from the point of view of someone whose social and academic education was entirely lacking so it's a naive and simply told story with no literary pretensions. Having basically brought herself up, because two criminal rapists really were not role models, it's amazing how coherent and comprehensible her story is. It's even fairly easy to follow the sequence of events from her kidnapping at age eleven until shortly after she gave birth to her second child by her pedophile abuser at age 17. (She never had any kind of medical care, including prenatal or obstetrical/midwife care, or dental care either; her survival is... well, things could have gone so very wrong in so many ways.) After that, apparently she wasn't subject to her captor Philiip's sexual frenzies: perhaps she aged-out. We're told a little about how she was required to home school the children and how they were told that Nancy, her female jailor, was their mother and she was their sister. But despite the fact that they were imprisoned in the same backyard, we hardly hear any more about them. The author may be trying to protect their privacy, but the result is that the last twelve years of her captivity are basically an untold story, a blank book which she fills as best she can with interminable stories of the cats she was allowed to nurture. By this stage of her imprisonment, she was allowed to keep a journal about her pets. There's an entire "baby book" about a cat, reprinted verbatim, which if I recall correctly she was in her twenties when she wrote it; it reads like the work of a junior high student. And then she ventured, with circumspect language, to express a few thoughts about her life in captivity. Perhaps she felt that her oppressors may have been figuratively or literally looking over her shoulder. When she wrote a list of ten best things in her life that made her happy at that time, chillingly her daughters didn't make it to the list. Perhaps that was wise, given what happened to most of her pets when she became attached (usually disappearance, nothing graphic).

So that's the structure of the book. Six years of her experiences as an abused child prisoner and two childbirths, twelve years of not saying much about what happened except to pets, and finally the rescue followed by reintegrating into normal life (this part extremely confusing, perhaps because of her trying to preserve the children's privacy, but I could get no idea of all of their living situation or relationship to her birth family either in terms of interaction or whether they lived in the next town or hours away), and equine therapy.

It's a worthy book and I'm sure it was valuable to her therapy. I don't regret reading it, but there's really no point in keeping it on the shelf. By my criteria for awarding stars, that puts it somewhere between two and three. ( )
  muumi | May 5, 2024 |
I decided to push aside my other reading and buy this book and read it. While this book is very good, it is VERY hard to read. Jaycee Dugard is VERY graphic in describing the abuse she suffered at the hands of Garrido. I had to stop reading and just take a break from it. If not for that, this book can easily be read in one sitting. This is a quick read, but she really gets the point across how miserable her life was with the Garridos, how sick her kidnapper was and how badly she wanted to go home. She also gets across just how strong her spirit is. She truly is a remarkable woman and it's nothing short of amazing that she survived this ordeal along with her daughters. ( )
  thatnerd | Mar 2, 2024 |
Fast read! heartbreaking but so emporing to women and victims of rape! like the way the story was told! ( )
  lmauro123 | Dec 28, 2023 |
Fast read! heartbreaking but so emporing to women and victims of rape! like the way the story was told! ( )
  lmauro123 | Dec 28, 2023 |
I read it in one afternoon...such a compelling story and highlights the reality of our spirits, that we do what we do to survive but we don't give up hope. It was well written. True and therefore scary, a real page turner. It is written as part of her healing yet you get a sense of her day to day life and how fragmented it was and sense of time was different for her. ( )
  Asauer72 | Jul 3, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 136 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
“a stolen life” by Jaycee Dugard is about a young girl who was captured at a very young age (11). Her capturer being a man twice her age who needed her help to fix his “problem.” Which at a young age Jaycee believed to be true. Truth is, he was using her for sexual pleasure. Jaycee was told this lie for many years, meaning attempting to escape whenever she had the chance. Until she reaches the age of 14; she finds out she is carrying a baby girl. Once she is born, she is the only thing tying Jaycee down to the horrors of the home she grew to become used to. Later on in the book she is met with more surprises and challenges throughout her 18 years of captivity. Which is why it is an incredible book and definitely recommendable to others. The author (Jaycee) is able to immediately grab readers attention, introduce something new within every chapter, and is able to help us create a relationship with her.

In the beginning of the autobiography, Jaycee captures the reader’s attention by commencing at the beginning of the day in which she will be taken. She begins engaging the reader by creating a sentimental feeling when she saids, “I made a point the night before to remind her to kiss me good-bye. As I lay in bed waiting, I hear the front door close. She has left. She has forgotten. I guess there is always tonight when she gets home from work to give her a kiss and hug.” (Dugard, 26) Reading from the book’s introduction and book summary we know she will be getting kidnapped. We know that may or may not have been her last chance to embrace her mother. So we feel sympathy for her and continue to read on, urging to find out when she will see her mother once again.

While continuously reading along with her life story we are given new drastic events that catch us off guard. The main turning point was when she was told she might be pregnant. “I told them my stomach was hurting a lot, too. They said, “We think you might be pregnant.” I was stunned and scared. What was going to happen to me? What was going to happen to the baby?” (Dugard, 167) The same questions she asked herself, were the same question we asked while reading. Where will she have the baby if she is not allowed to leave the house? Questions that drives you to keep reading into young Jaycee’s life. To summarize this situation; she has her first daughter at age fourteen. Her name is “A.” Two years later she gives birth to her second child, “G.” Adding even more weight to her shoulders. Also leading us to ask ourselves, “What will happen next?”

In general, “feeling” wise, the author is able have create multiple emotions throughout the book. An example for sympathy and sorrow is when she saids, “I am thirteen years old. I do not feel thirteen. I still feel like I’m eleven.” (Dugard, 128) Time, is a crucial thing in a child’s life. In this case Jaycee is missing her childhood, she is being held captive. It is a sad thing to miss out on the important events in a kids/teenagers life. Which is what was stolen from her; her innocence her child experiences. In another section of the book Jaycee is able to feel her pain even when she doesn’t say it directly. “He says that would be dangerous. Dangerous to whom? But I don’t argue.” (Dugard, Page 173) We feel the surrender and pain in her tone, she has given up on fighting back. We realize that she has finally come to accept it. We know that from here she will endure the most pain and receive traumatizing experiences. Which hurts us, but helps keep our focus on the book to continue reading it and create a relationship with her. With what she goes to we are able to relate to her, and put her experience with ours. Feeling the similarity, feeling the relationship forming between reader and author.

To sum it up, “a stolen life” by Jaycee Dugard is a definite read to those who are looking for a story with emotion and sensibility. A book that Dugard is able to immediately grab readers attention, introduce something new within every chapter, and is able to help us create a relationship with her. It is a positive recommendation in taking the time to read.
adicionado por it9801 | editarDesert View, Iliana Torres (Dec 17, 2017)
 
There are novelists, most notably Emma Donoghue in “Room,” who have tried to imagine what a plight like this is like. There are tabloids that have capitalized on its obscenity. And there are far too many survivors of ghastly crimes who have told their stories in lurid terms laced with self-pity. But Ms. Dugard is different. Her book is brave, dignified and painstakingly honest, even when it comes to the banal particulars of how she stayed afloat. The best parts of “A Stolen Life” are good enough to outweigh the hand-written journal entries about Eclipse, her beloved kitten. Yes, Eclipse is the name Ms. Dugard innocently chose.
adicionado por Shortride | editarThe New York Times, Janet Maslin (Jul 18, 2011)
 

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Jaycee Dugardautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Franz, ClaudiaÜbersetzerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Dedicated to my daughters. For the times we've cried together, laughed together. And all the times in between.
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Author's Note: This book might be confusing to some.
Ce livre en déconcertera peut-être certains.
Introduction: Let's get one thing straight! My name is Jaycee Lee Dugard.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico
LCC Canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (1)

The memoir of Jaycee Dugard who was kidnapped on June 10, 1991, when she was 11 years old, and was missing for over 18 years before her reappearance in 2009.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (3.77)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 54
2.5 3
3 133
3.5 22
4 186
4.5 13
5 133

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 207,010,801 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível