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The Mark of the Golden Dragon: Being an…
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The Mark of the Golden Dragon: Being an Account of the Further Adventures… (edição: 2011)

de L. A. Meyer (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
2321688,012 (3.81)16
In 1807, having survived a typhoon in the East Indies, Jacky Faber makes her way to London to seek a pardon for herself and her betrothed, Jaimy Fletcher, who, posing as a highwayman, is trying to avenge her supposed death.
Membro:BriannaLeeB
Título:The Mark of the Golden Dragon: Being an Account of the Further Adventures of Jacky Faber, Jewel of the East, Vexation of the West, and Pearl of the South China Sea (Bloody Jack Adventures)
Autores:L. A. Meyer (Autor)
Informação:HMH Books for Young Readers (2011), 384 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:to-read

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The Mark of the Golden Dragon: Being an Account of the Further Adventures of Jacky Faber, Jewel of the East, Vexation of the West, and Pearl of the South China Sea de L. A. Meyer

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» Veja também 16 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 15 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
A great addition to the series. Can't wait to get to book 10!

I really appreciate how the different situations are presented. More mature readers will get what is really going on, but the author never comes right out and makes official statements about a character and their behavior. I feel like these can be given to somewhat younger readers who will enjoy the story but completely miss the more adult scenarios. ( )
  Mirandalg14 | Oct 23, 2020 |
More Jacky Faber shenanigans fill this installment which seems a bit like filler before she jumps into more wartime adventures. ( )
  cindywho | May 27, 2019 |
This is without question the longest running series that I’ve consistently kept up with since I was about 14. And while a lot of the reviews seem to call for L.A. Meyer to wrap up the series I definitely think otherwise, they can keep coming, I adore every instalment in this series.
Admittedly, this had a rough start for me. The Orientalist/White Saviour deal that was happening in the beginning of this book rubbed me the wrong way. The very beginning with the village in which Jacky comes in and saves the day!… I could have done without that because it was unnecessary. It moved past the more problematic elements, though, and even noted them. Jacky thinks on a few different occasions how ridiculous British folk are for wanting to rule everything and changing Chinese names to better sound English. I appreciated that nod to the mentality of the time and how it isn’t a correct way of perceiving the world. So, this book got a star knocked down for the white saviour bit at the beginning and dipping into problematic territory BEFORE approaching it the correct way.
HOWEVER, the minute Jacky got out of the East, the story returned to what I love best about it. Jacky getting into trouble, making terrible choices, and being separated from Jaimy once again. The inclusion of one Lord Byron and a look into the higher society was what charmed me about this book. Jacky’s quest to find and rescue Jaimy who has gone mad since she went overboard - thinking her dead. That whole plot with Jaimy as a famous highway robber was delicious. A good bit, I do love how Meyer is able to put these two in the most ridiculous situations and pull them back out again. I’ve enjoyed watching the characters progress throughout the story. I loved that we got to hear more about Higgins’ life before Jacky and we saw old characters from Mississippi Jack.
Jacky as a character is one I adore simply because she just knows herself so well and takes no shit from anyone. This was the first time she gets called out on her ways with men and it was interesting to see her reaction to it. She’s just an incredibly interesting character and I love watching her progress (because she really has, and that’s the beauty of the series. There’s been 9 books so far and she’s progressed marvellously through each one). I look forward to the next book because the way this one ended promised for some good adventures to come. ( )
  eaduncan | Sep 14, 2017 |
This is without question the longest running series that I’ve consistently kept up with since I was about 14. And while a lot of the reviews seem to call for L.A. Meyer to wrap up the series I definitely think otherwise, they can keep coming, I adore every instalment in this series.
Admittedly, this had a rough start for me. The Orientalist/White Saviour deal that was happening in the beginning of this book rubbed me the wrong way. The very beginning with the village in which Jacky comes in and saves the day!… I could have done without that because it was unnecessary. It moved past the more problematic elements, though, and even noted them. Jacky thinks on a few different occasions how ridiculous British folk are for wanting to rule everything and changing Chinese names to better sound English. I appreciated that nod to the mentality of the time and how it isn’t a correct way of perceiving the world. So, this book got a star knocked down for the white saviour bit at the beginning and dipping into problematic territory BEFORE approaching it the correct way.
HOWEVER, the minute Jacky got out of the East, the story returned to what I love best about it. Jacky getting into trouble, making terrible choices, and being separated from Jaimy once again. The inclusion of one Lord Byron and a look into the higher society was what charmed me about this book. Jacky’s quest to find and rescue Jaimy who has gone mad since she went overboard - thinking her dead. That whole plot with Jaimy as a famous highway robber was delicious. A good bit, I do love how Meyer is able to put these two in the most ridiculous situations and pull them back out again. I’ve enjoyed watching the characters progress throughout the story. I loved that we got to hear more about Higgins’ life before Jacky and we saw old characters from Mississippi Jack.
Jacky as a character is one I adore simply because she just knows herself so well and takes no shit from anyone. This was the first time she gets called out on her ways with men and it was interesting to see her reaction to it. She’s just an incredibly interesting character and I love watching her progress (because she really has, and that’s the beauty of the series. There’s been 9 books so far and she’s progressed marvellously through each one). I look forward to the next book because the way this one ended promised for some good adventures to come. ( )
  glitzandshadows | Oct 12, 2015 |
Description: The irrepressible Jacky Faber, condemned for life to the English penal colony in Australia for crimes against the Crown, has once again wriggled out of the grasp of British authorities. Back on her flagship, the Lorelei Lee, she eagerly heads back to England in the company of friends and her beloved Jaimy Fletcher. But when the voyage is waylaid by pirates, storms, and her own impetuous nature, Jacky is cast into a world of danger that extends from the South China Sea to the equally treacherous waters of London politics. With the help of her loyal friends, Jacky meets her enemies head on in this tale of love, courage, and redemption.

Thoughts: I found this foray into Jacky's adventures quite misnamed and fairly boring. I was sure that the focus of the story would be a much more satisfying adventure throughout Asia, rather than a weak lucky break in one small Asian city that is wrapped up quickly and uninspiring. What occurs once back in England felt much too self-serving and not very interesting.

And the end. Oh lord, the end. Melodramatic barely covers it.

Really, really hoping that Viva Jacquelina! isn't My Bonny Light Horseman 2.0!

Rating: 3.08

Liked: 3
Plot: 2.5
Characterization: 3
Writing: 3
Audio: 4

http://www.librarything.com/topic/160137#4337337 ( )
  leahbird | Jul 5, 2015 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
L. A. Meyerautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Kellgren, KatherineNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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In 1807, having survived a typhoon in the East Indies, Jacky Faber makes her way to London to seek a pardon for herself and her betrothed, Jaimy Fletcher, who, posing as a highwayman, is trying to avenge her supposed death.

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