Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Notes from the House of the Dead de Fyodor…
Carregando...

Notes from the House of the Dead (original: 1848; edição: 2013)

de Fyodor Dostoevsky, Boris Jakim (Tradutor), James Scanlon (Prefácio)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
2,418304,495 (3.95)1 / 96
From the acclaimed translators Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky comes a new translation of the first great prison memoir: Fyodor Dostoevsky's fictionalized account of his life-changing penal servitude in Siberia. In 1849 Dostoevsky was sentenced to four years at hard labor in a Siberian prison camp for his participation in a utopian socialist discussion group. The account he wrote after his release, based on notes he smuggled out, was the first book to reveal life inside the Russian penal system. The book not only brought him fame but also founded the tradition of Russian prison writing. Notes from a Dead House (sometimes translated as The House of the Dead) is filled with vivid details of brutal punishments, shocking conditions, feuds and betrayals, and the psychological effects of the loss of freedom, but it also describes moments of comedy and acts of kindness. There are grotesque bathhouse and hospital scenes that seem to have come straight from Dante's Inferno, alongside daring escape attempts, doomed acts of defiance, and a theatrical Christmas celebration that draws the entire community together in a temporary suspension of their grim reality. To get past government censors, Dostoevsky made his narrator a common-law criminal rather than a political prisoner, but the perspective is unmistakably his own. His incarceration was a transformative experience that nourished all his later works, particularly Crime and Punishment. Dostoevsky's narrator discovers that even among the most debased criminals there are strong and beautiful souls. His story reveals the prison as a tragedy both for the inmates and for Russia; it is, finally, a profound meditation on freedom: "The prisoner himself knows that he is a prisoner; but no brands, no fetters will make him forget that he is a human being." … (mais)
Membro:malc
Título:Notes from the House of the Dead
Autores:Fyodor Dostoevsky
Outros autores:Boris Jakim (Tradutor), James Scanlon (Prefácio)
Informação:Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company (2013), Kindle Edition, 335 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

Recordações da Casa dos Mortos de Fyodor Dostoevsky (1848)

Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

» Veja também 96 menções

Inglês (23)  Francês (2)  Espanhol (1)  Sueco (1)  Catalão (1)  Português (1)  Holandês (1)  Todos os idiomas (30)
Mostrando 1-5 de 30 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
1
  Coach_of_Alva | Jan 2, 2021 |
Fascinating semi-autobiographical novel of Dostoyevsky and his years as a political prisoner in Siberia. He writes as "Alexander Petrovich" and these are "Alexander"'s thoughts and impressions of prison life under Nicholas I. Each chapter is a separate vignette, complete in itself. The convicts are given sharp psychological portraits. We see their interaction with each other and the prison authorities. We get a taste of the daily routine, Christmas and Easter celebrations, such as they are, the prison animals, an escape, protesting with a complaint, and finally, after years as a convict, freedom at last for the narrator.
Highly recommended. ( )
  janerawoof | Feb 15, 2020 |
So I finally got through, more or less, after dropping it once around halfway through. Woof. Given how much I loved Karamazov, C&P, and Notes from Underground, I didn't expect to feel how I felt about this one. I knew it was a prison memoir of sorts, but what I didn't account for was that it takes the form of a series of rambling impressions with the system with little or no plot between episodes. But given that the individual stories are not isolated enough, the book doesn't have even the strength of a good book of short stories. It really does show that this was one of Dostoevsky's first works, that's for sure. It's really a two star book, but i'll add an extra star for some choice quotes, which i'll type up here:
"Tyranny is a habit; it is endowed with development, and develops finally into an illness. I stand upon this, that the best of men can, from habit, become coarse and stupified to the point of brutality. Blood and power intoxicate: coarseness and depravity develop; the most abnormal phenomena become accessible and finally, sweet to the mind and feelings... Power is seductive. A society that looks indifferently upon such a phenomenon is itself infected at its foundation." and,
"To acknowledge one's guilt and ancestral sin is little, very little; it is necessary to break with them completely. And that cannot be done so quickly." (p. 197)
Although he meant the above in the context of executioners and corporal punishment, the second quote speaks to me especially regarding the perception and acknowledgement of white privilege as well as decolonization. Interesting that a book from 1862 about the Siberian forced labour system can speak to me so powerfully about that.

There's also a delightfully delightful sequence about his dogs. So there's that.

Old hiatus review:
Putting this on hiatus for a moment. The first ~150 pages are good - it's very interesting to learn about the russian/siberian prison system, but there is virtually no plot to keep me engaged. I'll come back to it later because Dostoevsky is a good writer but there are more interesting things right now. ( )
  jakebornheimer | Mar 27, 2019 |
(This is not the version of the book I read. My edition is an Oxford Classic predating ISBNs.)

Book reading in this house really slowed down here for a while, not because I wasn't reading, but because I was taking a 10 week Modern Poetry course online. I read nearly nothing else. Except this, slowly. Motivated by what I felt was an underperformance on a bunch of those "How Many of These Classics Have You Read?" memes going around Facebook, I tossed this into my bag for my homecoming trip. While Memoirs wasn't on any of those lists, any Dostoyevsky should raise my book nerd cred, right?

As it turns out, Memoirs is a strange sort of book. It's more of a series of character studies and recollections than anything with a forward-driving narrative, which contributed to the slowness with which I finished it. Whenever I was reading it, I enjoyed it, remarked on its insightfulness, pondered its ramifications for humanity in general and not just those living in a Siberian prison. But whenever I had to put it down, it was easy to leave it there -- especially during my overextended weeks of my ModPo class.

This book is remarkable both for the clarity of Dostoyevsky's descriptions and also for the amazing chasm between how prisoners are treated in this book and how they are treated now in the U.S. Not that I think modern prisoners should be flogged... But still. Everything must change. ( )
  greeniezona | Dec 6, 2017 |
Numa cidade perdida na Sibéria, o autor trava conhecimento com Aleksandr Petróvitch, o percetor das filhas do seu anfitrião. É um homem gasto, atarracado e enigmático, que se furta ansiosamente a todas as perguntas do autor. Mas este descobre, perguntando a um e outro, que Petróvitch vive ali sossegadamente depois de ter cumprido dez anos de trabalhos forçados pelo assassínio da mulher. Anos mais tarde, quando regressa à mesma cidade, o autor descobre que Petróvitch morreu, e que, entre as suas coisas, estão uns cadernos manuscritos com as suas memórias dos tempos de prisão. Depois de os ler, o autor decide publicar alguns capítulos, deixando à consideração dos leitores a avaliação do seu mérito.

Em Cadernos da Casa Morta, Dostoiévski conta-nos pela boca do seu personagem principal, o fidalgo Aleksandr Petróvitch, a sua experiência como prisioneiro político, durante quatro anos, num campo de correção siberiano. E o que tem para nos contar não é agradável: o sofrimento e os castigos, o clima duro da Sibéria, a corrupção entre os guardas, a sujidade e os piolhos. "De qualquer maneira, existem desconfortos perante os quais tudo isso se torna insignificante, tão depressa nos habituamos à imundície e a uma alimentação fraca e porca. O mais mimado fidalgote, o mais sensível senhorito, depois de um dia de trabalho em que sua em bica, comerá o pão negro e uma sopa em que nadam baratas." O que "dói" mesmo é a desumanização a que são sujeitos os presos que os leva a tornarem-se gente dura e quase insensível.

Aníbal Fernandes refere este livro como sendo um dos primeiros na literatura russa onde é mencionada a homossexualidade. Mas, tal como a maior parte das suas reflexões e críticas ao sistema prisional e social russo desta obra, Dostoiévski aborda o tema da homossexualidade muito brevemente e numa linguagem cheia de subentendidos. O personagem é Sirótkin, "uma criatura enigmática em muitos sentidos", muito belo, muito sossegado e meigo, gozado por todos os outros reclusos, e de quem Gáizin, um prisioneiro violento, era "muitas vezes, o amigo especial."
Embora seja apresentada por Dostoiévski como uma obra de ficção, a sua estrutura, uma sequência de capítulos temáticos, sem enredo a entreligá-los, reflete a sua publicação como uma série de artigos em jornal e o facto de se tratarem de memórias algo distantes, embora marcantes. Esta é a primeira tradução direta do russo (que até alterou o título tradicional em português, que era Recordações da Casa dos Mortos) e, talvez por isso, tem um tom rude e pouco "polido". ( )
  jmx | Jun 20, 2017 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 30 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Opptegnelser fra det døde hus er nært knyttet til Dostojevskijs erfaringer fra tukthusoppholdet i Sibir 1850-54. Den er en merkelig kombinasjon av rapport og fiksjon, med dokumentarisk detaljerte beskrivelser av de forferdelige forhold fangene lever under, og fremfor alt en rekke portretter av mennesker som har bragt seg selv - eller av omstendighetene er blitt bragt - på den gale siden av loven, inkludert hovedpersonen selv.
adicionado por kirstenlund | editarwww.solumforlag.no (Sep 23, 2009)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (97 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Dostoevsky, Fyodorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Coulson, JessieTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Edwards, H. SutherlandTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Garnett, ConstanceTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Lahtela, MarkkuTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
McDuff, DavidTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Pekari, IdaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Pevear, RichardTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Pyykkö, LeaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Volokhonsky, LarissaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em Finlandês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
In the remote regions of Siberia, amidst the steppes, mountains and impassable forests, one sometimes comes across little, plainly built wooden towns of one or often two thousand inhabitants, with two chiurches - one in the town itself, and the other in the cememtry outside - towns that are more like the good-sized villages of the Moscow district than they are like towms.

(David McDuff translation)
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (2)

From the acclaimed translators Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky comes a new translation of the first great prison memoir: Fyodor Dostoevsky's fictionalized account of his life-changing penal servitude in Siberia. In 1849 Dostoevsky was sentenced to four years at hard labor in a Siberian prison camp for his participation in a utopian socialist discussion group. The account he wrote after his release, based on notes he smuggled out, was the first book to reveal life inside the Russian penal system. The book not only brought him fame but also founded the tradition of Russian prison writing. Notes from a Dead House (sometimes translated as The House of the Dead) is filled with vivid details of brutal punishments, shocking conditions, feuds and betrayals, and the psychological effects of the loss of freedom, but it also describes moments of comedy and acts of kindness. There are grotesque bathhouse and hospital scenes that seem to have come straight from Dante's Inferno, alongside daring escape attempts, doomed acts of defiance, and a theatrical Christmas celebration that draws the entire community together in a temporary suspension of their grim reality. To get past government censors, Dostoevsky made his narrator a common-law criminal rather than a political prisoner, but the perspective is unmistakably his own. His incarceration was a transformative experience that nourished all his later works, particularly Crime and Punishment. Dostoevsky's narrator discovers that even among the most debased criminals there are strong and beautiful souls. His story reveals the prison as a tragedy both for the inmates and for Russia; it is, finally, a profound meditation on freedom: "The prisoner himself knows that he is a prisoner; but no brands, no fetters will make him forget that he is a human being." 

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Biblioteca Histórica: Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Fyodor Dostoyevsky tem uma Biblioteca Histórica. As bibliotecas históricas são bibliotecas privadas de leitores famosos introduzidas por membros do LibraryThing que integram o grupo Biblioteca Históricas.

Veja de Fyodor Dostoyevsky o perfil histórico.

Veja de a página de autor deFyodor Dostoyevsky.

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.95)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 9
2.5 7
3 74
3.5 21
4 140
4.5 25
5 84

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 155,632,622 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível