Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

The Axe: The Master of Hestviken, Vol. 1 de…
Carregando...

The Axe: The Master of Hestviken, Vol. 1 (original: 1925; edição: 1994)

de Sigrid Undset

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
275872,838 (4.03)17
Set in thirteenth-century Norway, a land racked by political turmoil and bloody family vendettas, The Axe is the first volume in Sigrid Undset's epic tetralogy, The Master of Hestviken. In it we meet Olav Audunsson and Ingunn Steinfinnsdatter, who were betrothed as children and raised as brother and sister. Now, in the heedlessness of youth, they become lovers, unaware that their ardor will forge the first link in a chain of murder, exile, and disgrace. Soaringly romantic and psychologically nuanced, Undset's novel is also a meticulous re-creation of a world split between pagan codes of retribution and the rigors of Christian piety--a world where law is a fragile new invention and manslaughter is so common that it's punishable by fine.… (mais)
Membro:Krzys
Título:The Axe: The Master of Hestviken, Vol. 1
Autores:Sigrid Undset
Informação:Vintage (1994), Edition: 1st Vintage Books, Paperback, 304 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

The Master of Hestviken, Vol. 1: The Axe de Sigrid Undset (1925)

Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 17 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 9 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Part 1 of a tetralogy, with anew translation from Tiina Nunally (who also did the fabulous translation of Kristin Lavransdatter).

In many ways this book is similar to KL--it too takes place in Medieval Norway. The main characters are landowners and those in the church. But Olav is an orphan raised as a foster son, betrothed to his foster sister by their fathers before his father's death.

This volume shows their happy childhoods, and then the whirlwind of familial manipulation, misunderstanding, benign neglect, greed, and rampant misogyny that was all part of upper class Norwegian life. Olav and Ingunn are determined to marry--this volume details the trouble, suffering, difficulties, violence, negotiation, and waiting (so much waiting) that they go through to fulfill their betrothal.

I didn't find this volume quite as gripping as book 1 of KL, but that may be partly because OA is a man. I personally relate more to Ingunn, but she is a little insufferable.

Looking forward to part 2, though I have no idea when it will be out. ( )
  Dreesie | Dec 31, 2020 |
The translator from the original Norwegian, Tiina Nunnally, waxes confusingly ecstatic about the prose style of author, Undset, calling it "lyrical" on the one hand and "plain" on the other. She praises the author's descriptions, especially of the natural landscape of Norway, but has nothing to say about scenic and action passages -- perhaps because they aren't scenic and get little development? Naturally, a reader would expect the person who works on a translation of a novel would have to enjoy working on the project. Likewise, a novel reader's expectations are different from and more demanding than those of a 'devoted translator'.. Sadly, "Olav Audunsson" lacks too many aspects of the novel to give the reader much else than a long telling narrative that lacks scenic showing.

Consequently, the characters don't live beyond seeming like pawns the author moves about the story board.; they feel manipulated rather than alive. Is it because of an early 20th C. style that doesn't adhere to more desirable technique required by today's readers? Not really. Plenty of other authors, writing at the same time and even a century earlier, were masters of scenic story telling who created vivid self-motivated characters whose personalities were multi-dimensional. So, I feel justified in faulting the writer.

Beyond style and characterization that is like that in biblical stories (genealogical and structured for the author's purpose of getting a point across) the plot in Undset's book is thin and foregone. Again, the fault is in the writing. Instead of surprises, readers get repetition; instead of a unique reading experience, the reader feels little "pull" from the power of narrative to be drawn into the life and incidents of the hero and heroine. Nor is there the satisfying feeling after one reads a truly good novel, that it is memorable and will resonate in memory long after one closes the covers. I'm not shocked that "Olav Audunsson" is a near "forgotten" and overlooked work in our era. because I'm already beginning to forget it

For me, the novel was uninteresting, not compelling, and can only rate a recommendation to other readers for the experience of learning what the Nobel Committee found to be prize-worthy in the first decade of the last century.

#OlavAudunssøn #NetGalley ( )
  Limelite | Oct 11, 2020 |
[Previously read in May, 2014.] ( )
  LudieGrace | Aug 10, 2020 |
Spoilers:
Set in medieval Norway, the plot concerns two young teens, betrothed as children, raised as foster brother and sister, who fall in love and have sex before they are married. This sets up a conflict among the girl's kinsmen who want to disavow the betrothal after the girl's parents die. The boy, though rich, is not powerful, and Norway is in a state of of political upheaval, so power and influence are much more important than land. The boy commits a murder of one of her kinsmen and is exiled for eight years. Much of the book contains the life of the girl, as she lives as a low status noblewoman among her kinsmen. Eventually she is tempted to tryst with a traveling clerk and becomes pregnant, thereby thrusting the boy, who has returned to claim her, into disrepute.

The style is intentionally somewhat archaic -- like a fairy tale. I particularly liked the character of the girl. She is constantly referred to as being dim-witted but nevertheless the object and subject of abiding love. She is lazy and fairly useless but loves and is loved anyway, clearly despite the fact that its an unhealthy relationship for both of them. The book explores the idea of loyalty in many guises -- loyal lover, kinsman, friend. What should be the limits of loyalty?

Another interesting theme is the conflict between the old pagan laws and the new Christian rules. Power struggles between bishops and nobles, between justifiable homicides which may be excused by the payment of weregeld based on the deceased status and the new canon law which holds murder a mortal sin, punishable by death or banishment.

The characters, too, are caught between Christian and pagan folkways. As a history lesson this book is fascinating. Norway sounds gorgeous. I'd love to visit sometime. ( )
  aprille | Dec 14, 2019 |
Considered to be the companion to Undset's Kristin Lavransdatter, The Master of Hestviken series tells the saga of Olav Audunsson in thirteenth century Norway. As a boy he was raised by a foster family. When you are first plunked down in the middle of the drama you meet Steinfinn, a young man who fell in love with a fair maiden named Ingebjorg. So far so good, except Ingebjorg was betrothed to someone named Mattias. Doesn't matter. Steinfinn and Ingebjorg run away and live together as if they are man and wife. They soon have a family of three children, one of them being the beautiful Ingunn. In addition to their own children they foster a young lad by the aforementioned name of Olav Audunsson. Thus begins the romance of Ingunn and Olav. Both Olav and Ingunn's fathers agreed the two would grow up to marry each other, but after Steinfinn passes the young couple are told it was only a game their fathers played and the betrothal is not real. Cue the violins, people. Olav commits murder with an axe named Kinfetch and that complicates things. He escapes punishment but in the meantime Ingunn is struck by some mysterious paralysis amid rumors of witchcraft. And the plot thickens. Especially when she becomes pregnant during Olav's exile... ( )
  SeriousGrace | Oct 31, 2019 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 9 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
The Steinfinnsons was the name folk gave to a kin that flourished in the country about Lake Mjösen at the time the sons of Harald Gille held sway in Norway.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (1)

Set in thirteenth-century Norway, a land racked by political turmoil and bloody family vendettas, The Axe is the first volume in Sigrid Undset's epic tetralogy, The Master of Hestviken. In it we meet Olav Audunsson and Ingunn Steinfinnsdatter, who were betrothed as children and raised as brother and sister. Now, in the heedlessness of youth, they become lovers, unaware that their ardor will forge the first link in a chain of murder, exile, and disgrace. Soaringly romantic and psychologically nuanced, Undset's novel is also a meticulous re-creation of a world split between pagan codes of retribution and the rigors of Christian piety--a world where law is a fragile new invention and manslaughter is so common that it's punishable by fine.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (4.03)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 10
3.5 5
4 7
4.5 5
5 15

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 157,804,950 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível