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Robopocalypse

de Daniel H. Wilson

Séries: Robopocalypse (1)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
1,9301496,557 (3.62)1 / 106
Two decades into the future humans are battling for their very survival when a powerful AI computer goes rogue, and all the machines on earth rebel against their human controllers.
  1. 120
    World War Z de Max Brooks (divinenanny, timspalding)
    divinenanny: Same set up, but instead of robots, zombies are the one causing world war.
    timspalding: Very similar style.
  2. 50
    The Passage de Justin Cronin (historycycles)
    historycycles: Robopolcalypse, in a number of ways, reminds me of The Passage in that it is the human race, trying to push the boundaries of science, that ends up beginning the process of their own destruction.
  3. 30
    The Stand de Stephen King (timspalding)
  4. 11
    The Andromeda Strain de Michael Crichton (TomWaitsTables)
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Mostrando 1-5 de 149 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Robopocalypse: Skynet's more human tolerant little brother

THIS BOOK WAS AMAZING.

Robopocalypse (Daniel H Wilson) starts in a different position than most machine armageddon stories, beginning 20 minutes after the Humans have won the war with ‘Big Rob’. Our narrator, Cormac ‘Bright Boy’ Wallace is spraying bursts of fire out across the frozen Alaskan tundra to confuse a swarm of mini-bots called stumpers into premature explosion. Stumpers contain compartmentalized chemicals that are mixed when they feel the warmth of a human leg, leading to a debilitating POP and the loss of an appendage.

Bright Boy Squad locates something unexpected in the frozen expanse- a sentient storage device that has been collecting insane amounts of data from the world since the activation day of Archos (the AI ). The book follows a similar presentation as World War Z (Max Brooks), depicting the novel as a series of short stories in a historical compilation of key events from pre-war to the end, recorded by the device, and cross commented by Wallace.

Unlike Skynet in the Terminator universe or the variations of Skynet in the novels crafted by SM Stirling, Archos seems to have a level of tolerance for Humans. It has plans for humans that do not include extinction, though a 99% population decrease seems to be in an allowed range. I believe that this is actually worse for humans than annihilation. It opens the door to uncomfortable questions.

Highlight for me was chapter 2, with Archos awakening and it’s path to world connectivity.

Approaching complex technical topics from a simple layman perspective, this should be a very approachable novel for most readers. ( )
  Toast.x2 | Sep 23, 2021 |
Fast Sci-fi. ( )
  royragsdale | Sep 22, 2021 |
Twenty minutes after the war ended Brightboy squad made a discovery that was as disturbing as it was inspiring. This discovery was literally little more then a black box, but what made it so monumentious, so compelling, was that this was The Black Box of the war. Every human to have an impact on the outcome of the war, no matter how small their part, were monitored and recorded, their actions forever replaying within the black box. These are the heroes of mankind, these are their stories.

Deep underground a scientist is bringing the most sophisticated machine ever built online; this is the beginning of the end for mankind. A solider in Afghanistan is reporting on an event that should never have happened, could not have been possible. A little girl is awoken by a nightmare, only it wasn't a dream. A technician in Japan is watching the one person he loves squeeze the life out of him. A Texas driller and his crew will take a job in remote Alaska, it will be their last.

Robopocalypse is a story of the enduring nature of mankind, but more then just a story of survival it is a story about life. Within these pages are the very best and worst of mankind, for even as adversity brings out he best in some, it brings out the worse in others. But ultimately this is a story of people who have become heroes through their everyday actions of survival. A brilliantly thought-out story that is told in the most engrossing and compelling of ways. A story that is all the more chilling because it tells of a future that is all too possible. ( )
  LarissaBookGirl | Aug 2, 2021 |
This was a great book to have during sleepless nights, because it made me not mind being sleepless.

Overall I really liked it, but its narrative inconsistencies kept me from giving it a 5-star rating. There were characters we were TOLD were important but they seemed to flash by all too quickly. I would have been happier I think had it been a bit longer & circled back around to some of the characters to wrap up their storylines a bit more.

None of that would keep me from recommending this as an excellent summer read though, especially if you're a fan of World War Z. ( )
  jlweiss | Apr 23, 2021 |
I re-read this book to prep for reading the sequel, and my complaint about it this time is the same as the first time I read it: it's exactly like World War Z, but not in a good way. It seems to me like someone suggested switching a multi-perspective story over to an oral history format like WWZ after it was already written, so it's got this format tacked on that just doesn't fit well. Overall I liked the story and I'm interested to see if Daniel H. Wilson either abandons this format or does a better job with it in the next book. ( )
  jlweiss | Apr 23, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 149 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Wilson also sets up images of grand terror, then doesn’t know what to do with them; he’s too focused on his central storyline of how the war was lost, then won. Brief mentions of terrifying work camps where robots experiment on humans don’t get much weight, and the book spends minimal time explaining how independent human communities function in the post-robot-uprising world. It’s telling that the book’s best section—a brief tale of men sent to the remote wilderness to drill a hole, realizing they’re there at the behest of the devil himself—ends with broad fatalities.
 
There’s an unfortunate sameness to the characters, whether rough-and-ready brothers in their 30s (there’s an inside joke here to Wilson’s 2010 battling-brothers book Bro-Jitsu) or an 11-year-old girl with an unlikely role to play in the proceedings or a battle android unaffiliated with either side (another inside joke, to a toy the author bought on the night of his first date with his now wife) who surely will star in the book’s sequel. Maybe there’s a message in this sameness, that humanity is itself a character to be celebrated, just as perhaps all technology, every buttoned and Bluetoothed object that makes our life easier, is to be scrutinized and respected.
adicionado por ShelfMonkey | editarThe Globe and Mail, John Burns (Jun 24, 2011)
 
Still, Robopocalypse was an enjoyable read, well worth the wait. It’s got a great plot and villain and conversations between man and machine that really made me think. Some will likely label it a cautionary tale, but I won’t go that far.
adicionado por KlingonHaiku | editarGeek Dad, James Floyd Kelly (Jun 11, 2011)
 
It's more than just a screenplay, though, and worth the time to read. There are a few beautiful moments of writing throughout "Robopocalypse" that make it a worthy addition to the canon of robot apocalypse books, movies and comics that have come before.
adicionado por KlingonHaiku | editarFlorida Today, Chris Talbott (Jun 10, 2011)
 
It's worth reading before Spielberg's version of Robopocalypse hits screens in 2013 — and before the army of factory-built roboclones starts to arrive. B+
 

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Twenty minutes after the war ends, I'm watching stumpers pour up out of a frozen hole in the ground like ants from hell and praying that I keep my natural legs for another day.
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Two decades into the future humans are battling for their very survival when a powerful AI computer goes rogue, and all the machines on earth rebel against their human controllers.

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