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The Net Delusion: How Not to Liberate The World (2011)

de Evgeny Morozov

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4511241,566 (3.61)11
Updated with a new Afterword "The revolution will be Twittered!" declared journalist Andrew Sullivan after protests erupted in Iran. But as journalist and social commentator Evgeny Morozov argues in The Net Delusion, the Internet is a tool that both revolutionaries and authoritarian governments can use. For all of the talk in the West about the power of the Internet to democratize societies, regimes in Iran and China are as stable and repressive as ever. Social media sites have been used there to entrench dictators and threaten dissidents, making it harder--not easier--to promote democracy. Marshalling a compelling set of case studies, The Net Delusion shows why the cyber-utopian stance that the Internet is inherently liberating is wrong, and how ambitious and seemingly noble initiatives like the promotion of "Internet freedom" are misguided and, on occasion, harmful.… (mais)
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» Veja também 11 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 12 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Way too long but absolutely fascinating for anybody interested in digital activism and information access. ( )
  jobinsonlis | May 11, 2021 |
Interesting, but I'm not in the right headspace to deal with dark meanderings. Didn't finish it. ( )
  Jandrew74 | May 26, 2019 |
Selected e-content from Google Books: https://goo.gl/i3uMee
Review from World Cat:
This volume examines the evolving role of the Internet in activism, dissent, and authoritarian regimes. The author investigates the impact of a range of media on social revolution and activism from television in East Germany to Twitter during Iran's Green Revolution, intertwining that analysis with discussion of the ways governments are able to use the Internet for surveillance of political activity, propaganda dissemination, and censorship. He analyzes the effect of the proliferation of available entertainment and access to consumer goods on the potential for political activity, arguing that opening societies to further consumerism and to Western cultural media has in some ways deterred political activism. The author's argument that the West conflates democratization with consumerism uncovers a critique of the West here for its complacent belief that the Internet and supposed freedom of information is a certain pathway to democratization.
  COREEducation | Jun 11, 2015 |
The recent revelations about the extent of NSA surveillance makes this book about the many paradoxes of so-called "Internet freedom" all the more relevant. ( )
  Sullywriter | May 22, 2015 |
Interesting take on the dangers of technology worship. Essentially, Morozov writes if the Internet can be used for spreading democracy and freedom, as many politicians and talking heads say, it can and is used for anti-democratic ends as well. Morozov provides many (MANY) examples of this, and more than a few times I thought, "Ok, I believe you!" (Although, to be fair, while I use computer technology almost every day, I also share his view that technology does not necessarily mean that good or useful results happen in the end, so I didn't need a terrible amount of convincing.) Worth a read, but you can skim a couple of parts, and the second half is quite compelling. ( )
  MichaelDC | Apr 3, 2013 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 12 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
The Net Delusion is two books in one. The first, which is excellent, shows how flimsy the arguments of Washington policymakers are. The second, which is far from excellent, makes some rather flimsy arguments of its own. When Morozov argues against the grandiose claims of US policymakers, he is eager to tell us how little we know. When, in contrast, he is arguing on behalf of his own theories, he is prone to suggesting that we know rather more than we do.
 
The Net Delusion is considerably more than an assault on political rhetoric; for, it argues, behind many of the fine words recently spoken in praise of technology lies a combination of utopianism and ignorance that grossly misrepresents the internet's political role and potentials.
adicionado por mikeg2 | editarThe Guardian, Tom Chartfield (Jan 9, 2011)
 
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For anyone who wants to see democracy prevail in the most hostile and unlikely environments, the first decade of the new millennium was marked by a sense of bitter disappointment, if not utter disillusionment.
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Updated with a new Afterword "The revolution will be Twittered!" declared journalist Andrew Sullivan after protests erupted in Iran. But as journalist and social commentator Evgeny Morozov argues in The Net Delusion, the Internet is a tool that both revolutionaries and authoritarian governments can use. For all of the talk in the West about the power of the Internet to democratize societies, regimes in Iran and China are as stable and repressive as ever. Social media sites have been used there to entrench dictators and threaten dissidents, making it harder--not easier--to promote democracy. Marshalling a compelling set of case studies, The Net Delusion shows why the cyber-utopian stance that the Internet is inherently liberating is wrong, and how ambitious and seemingly noble initiatives like the promotion of "Internet freedom" are misguided and, on occasion, harmful.

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