Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

I Am Not Sick, I Don't Need Help! How to…
Carregando...

I Am Not Sick, I Don't Need Help! How to Help Someone with Mental Illness… (edição: 2011)

de Xavier Amador

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1404148,100 (4.31)1
"This book fills a tremendous void..." wrote E. Fuller Torrey, M.D., about the first edition of I Am Not Sick, I Don't Need Help! Ten years later, it still does. Dr. Amador's research on poor insight was inspired by his attempts to help his brother Henry, who developed schizophrenia, accept treatment. Like tens of millions of others diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, Henry did not be lieve he was ill. I Am Not Sick, I Don't Need Help! is not just a reference for mental health practitioners or law enforcement professionals. It is a must-read guide for family members whose loved ones are battling mental illness. Read and learn as have hundreds of thousands of others...to Leap ùListen, Empathize, Agree, and Partnerùand help your patients and loved ones accept the treatment they need. Book jacket.… (mais)
Membro:PIOBibliotek
Título:I Am Not Sick, I Don't Need Help! How to Help Someone with Mental Illness Accept Treatment. 10th Anniversary Edition.
Autores:Xavier Amador
Informação:Vida Press (2011), Utgave: 10th Anniversary Edition, Paperback, 254 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:mental | helse | akseptere | sykdom | behandling | psykiatri | sykdomsinnsikt | selvinnsikt | innsikt | sykdomsforståelse | alvorlig | sinnslidelse

Detalhes da Obra

I Am Not Sick, I Don't Need Help! de Xavier Amador

Nenhum(a).

Nenhum(a)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 1 menção

Exibindo 4 de 4
Review by Family Resource Centre volunteer, Nik:

The million-dollar question is “how do you convince someone who is in denial to take treatment?”. This book provides the skills to achieve acceptance of treatment in a practical way without resentment or damage to relationships. The skills described have been proven to be effective by many professionals.

A family member myself, I can relate to the lack of support and “how to” skills needed to work effectively with loved ones with mental illness. The books to assist family members and care givers are also scarce. This book tries to fill this void and deals with how to effectively and constructively convince a person with mental illness to undergo treatment.

The author, Xavier Amado, is a clinical psychologist with wide professional experience, and whose brother has schizophrenia.

Recent studies show that about 50 percent of those suffering from mental health issues may not recognize that they are sick and need help. Therefore, non-adherence to treatment plans is a common problem. Persuasion or nagging by family members often results in the loved one becoming more stubborn, taking it as interference in personal life and privacy, and may result in damage of relationships. The denial or non-recognition of being ill in many cases further aggravates the illness and may result in dire legal and life-threatening consequences. The author provides tools for family and health professionals as to how they can potentially avoid this.

The author and his colleagues developed a communication technique and tools for how to convince a patient to undertake treatment, LEAP: Learning – Empathize – Agree - Partner.
The book consists of 4 parts. Part 1 contains the facts and myths about denials of illness, current studies on this common problem termed “anosognosea”, the possible causes and complications of not addressing it. Some facts in this part that I find of interest are:

- About half of the patients with serious mental illness don’t take their medications mostly because of the poor insight into illness.
- Poor insight is another symptom of the disorder, and has nothing to do with being defensive or stubborn.
- Denial of the diagnosis is not due to ignorance of symptoms of the disorder but a symptom itself. Studies have shown that many patients with poor insight into their own illnesses are excellent at diagnosing the same illness in others.
- Research shows that awareness of the positive effects of medications can be more important to medication adherence than insight into the illness itself.
- Studies show that getting seriously mentally ill persons into treatment early and keeping them there are very important for not worsening and for earlier recovery.

Part 2 describes “How to Help Using LEAP”. Here, the author describes the right and wrong approaches. Part 3 is titled “Staying on Guard and Next Steps”. This part deals with different treatments where there is poor adherence, how to proceed with involuntary treatment, and recognizing the warning signs. Part 4 addresses the LEAP theory and research and practical advice on LEAP. The issue of violence and mental illness is discussed in a chapter. the end of the book lists recommended resources.
The skills incorporated in LEAP have much wider application and usefulness besides convincing a patient to take treatment. Frustration due to different opinions, arguments, conflict or an impasse happens almost every day at home, work or schools that sours relationships. With this in mind, Dr. Amador has written another widely acclaimed book titled “I’m Right, You’re Wrong, Now What: Break the Impasse and Get What You Need”.
  familyresourcecentre | Nov 20, 2019 |
Review by Family Resource Centre volunteer, Nik:

The million-dollar question is “how do you convince someone who is in denial to take treatment?”. This book provides the skills to achieve acceptance of treatment in a practical way without resentment or damage to relationships. The skills described have been proven to be effective by many professionals.

A family member myself, I can relate to the lack of support and “how to” skills needed to work effectively with loved ones with mental illness. The books to assist family members and care givers are also scarce. This book tries to fill this void and deals with how to effectively and constructively convince a person with mental illness to undergo treatment.

The author, Xavier Amado, is a clinical psychologist with wide professional experience, and whose brother has schizophrenia.

Recent studies show that about 50 percent of those suffering from mental health issues may not recognize that they are sick and need help. Therefore, non-adherence to treatment plans is a common problem. Persuasion or nagging by family members often results in the loved one becoming more stubborn, taking it as interference in personal life and privacy, and may result in damage of relationships. The denial or non-recognition of being ill in many cases further aggravates the illness and may result in dire legal and life-threatening consequences. The author provides tools for family and health professionals as to how they can potentially avoid this.

The author and his colleagues developed a communication technique and tools for how to convince a patient to undertake treatment, LEAP: Learning – Empathize – Agree - Partner.
The book consists of 4 parts. Part 1 contains the facts and myths about denials of illness, current studies on this common problem termed “anosognosea”, the possible causes and complications of not addressing it. Some facts in this part that I find of interest are:

- About half of the patients with serious mental illness don’t take their medications mostly because of the poor insight into illness.
- Poor insight is another symptom of the disorder, and has nothing to do with being defensive or stubborn.
- Denial of the diagnosis is not due to ignorance of symptoms of the disorder but a symptom itself. Studies have shown that many patients with poor insight into their own illnesses are excellent at diagnosing the same illness in others.
- Research shows that awareness of the positive effects of medications can be more important to medication adherence than insight into the illness itself.
- Studies show that getting seriously mentally ill persons into treatment early and keeping them there are very important for not worsening and for earlier recovery.

Part 2 describes “How to Help Using LEAP”. Here, the author describes the right and wrong approaches. Part 3 is titled “Staying on Guard and Next Steps”. This part deals with different treatments where there is poor adherence, how to proceed with involuntary treatment, and recognizing the warning signs. Part 4 addresses the LEAP theory and research and practical advice on LEAP. The issue of violence and mental illness is discussed in a chapter. the end of the book lists recommended resources.
The skills incorporated in LEAP have much wider application and usefulness besides convincing a patient to take treatment. Frustration due to different opinions, arguments, conflict or an impasse happens almost every day at home, work or schools that sours relationships. With this in mind, Dr. Amador has written another widely acclaimed book titled “I’m Right, You’re Wrong, Now What: Break the Impasse and Get What You Need”.
  familyresourcecentre | Nov 20, 2019 |
Review by Family Resource Centre volunteer, Nik:

The million-dollar question is “how do you convince someone who is in denial to take treatment?”. This book provides the skills to achieve acceptance of treatment in a practical way without resentment or damage to relationships. The skills described have been proven to be effective by many professionals.

A family member myself, I can relate to the lack of support and “how to” skills needed to work effectively with loved ones with mental illness. The books to assist family members and care givers are also scarce. This book tries to fill this void and deals with how to effectively and constructively convince a person with mental illness to undergo treatment.

The author, Xavier Amado, is a clinical psychologist with wide professional experience, and whose brother has schizophrenia.

Recent studies show that about 50 percent of those suffering from mental health issues may not recognize that they are sick and need help. Therefore, non-adherence to treatment plans is a common problem. Persuasion or nagging by family members often results in the loved one becoming more stubborn, taking it as interference in personal life and privacy, and may result in damage of relationships. The denial or non-recognition of being ill in many cases further aggravates the illness and may result in dire legal and life-threatening consequences. The author provides tools for family and health professionals as to how they can potentially avoid this.

The author and his colleagues developed a communication technique and tools for how to convince a patient to undertake treatment, LEAP: Learning – Empathize – Agree - Partner.
The book consists of 4 parts. Part 1 contains the facts and myths about denials of illness, current studies on this common problem termed “anosognosea”, the possible causes and complications of not addressing it. Some facts in this part that I find of interest are:

- About half of the patients with serious mental illness don’t take their medications mostly because of the poor insight into illness.
- Poor insight is another symptom of the disorder, and has nothing to do with being defensive or stubborn.
- Denial of the diagnosis is not due to ignorance of symptoms of the disorder but a symptom itself. Studies have shown that many patients with poor insight into their own illnesses are excellent at diagnosing the same illness in others.
- Research shows that awareness of the positive effects of medications can be more important to medication adherence than insight into the illness itself.
- Studies show that getting seriously mentally ill persons into treatment early and keeping them there are very important for not worsening and for earlier recovery.

Part 2 describes “How to Help Using LEAP”. Here, the author describes the right and wrong approaches. Part 3 is titled “Staying on Guard and Next Steps”. This part deals with different treatments where there is poor adherence, how to proceed with involuntary treatment, and recognizing the warning signs. Part 4 addresses the LEAP theory and research and practical advice on LEAP. The issue of violence and mental illness is discussed in a chapter. the end of the book lists recommended resources.
The skills incorporated in LEAP have much wider application and usefulness besides convincing a patient to take treatment. Frustration due to different opinions, arguments, conflict or an impasse happens almost every day at home, work or schools that sours relationships. With this in mind, Dr. Amador has written another widely acclaimed book titled “I’m Right, You’re Wrong, Now What: Break the Impasse and Get What You Need”.
  familyresourcecentre | Nov 20, 2019 |
The best book I've read on how to effectively communicate with a loved one suffering from mental illness. A must-read! ( )
  migsysmith | Oct 26, 2007 |
Exibindo 4 de 4
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha

» Adicionar outros autores (1 possível)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Xavier Amadorautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Johanson, Anna-Lisaautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

"This book fills a tremendous void..." wrote E. Fuller Torrey, M.D., about the first edition of I Am Not Sick, I Don't Need Help! Ten years later, it still does. Dr. Amador's research on poor insight was inspired by his attempts to help his brother Henry, who developed schizophrenia, accept treatment. Like tens of millions of others diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, Henry did not be lieve he was ill. I Am Not Sick, I Don't Need Help! is not just a reference for mental health practitioners or law enforcement professionals. It is a must-read guide for family members whose loved ones are battling mental illness. Read and learn as have hundreds of thousands of others...to Leap ùListen, Empathize, Agree, and Partnerùand help your patients and loved ones accept the treatment they need. Book jacket.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (4.31)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3
3.5
4 6
4.5
5 6

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 155,608,192 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível