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Physics of the Future: How Science Will…
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Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily… (original: 2011; edição: 2012)

de Michio Kaku (Autor)

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1,1212213,078 (3.64)19
The "New York Times"-bestselling author of "Physics of the Impossible" offers a stunning and provocative vision of the future, and explains how science will shape human destiny and everyone's daily life by the year 2100.
Membro:bgreyno
Título:Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100
Autores:Michio Kaku (Autor)
Informação:Anchor (2012), Edition: Reprint, 480 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 de Michio Kaku (2011)

  1. 00
    Scatter, Adapt, and Remember: How Humans Will Survive a Mass Extinction de Annalee Newitz (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Both books take a survey of cutting edge science & technology in various fields and extrapolate on how these advancements might effect life in the future.
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People who could most benefit by reading this willl not find it or read it... wish it was otherwise... ( )
  Brightman | Nov 27, 2019 |
Michio Kaku is, in my opinion, our most entertaining science popularizer right now. He's a theoretical physicist and a science fiction fan, and the result is he's not afraid to imagine and project what might be, as well as talking knowledgeably about what we do know and can do now, on the cutting edge of science and technology.

In this book, he looks at what we can expect in technology in manufacturing, information technology, medicine, and transportation, in the near, medium, and more distant future. Said that way, it doesn't sound too exciting, but three-d printers, nano-technology, self-driving cars, and the ability to slow or reverse the aging process offer possibilities as amazing to us as airplanes and space travel would have been to 18th century Europeans. Programmable matter, able to transform into any number of different tools and objects at the press of a button, might turn out to be one of the more mundane developments.

Kaku breaks his text up into broad subject areas, including artificial intelligence, medicine, transportation, and space travel, and then gives us near-term, medium-term, and "by 2100 or beyond" projections of what we can expect. He has a clear, direct, conversational style, and never talks down to his readers, but assumes anyone can understand the essential points if they're explained clearly.

Recommended.

I borrowed this book from the library.
( )
  LisCarey | Sep 19, 2018 |
Robots, AI, nanotechnology, energy, superconductivity... The list of projected future achievements speculated about in this book is impressive. I look forward to seeing some of these things. An effective cure for aging perhaps is most appealing, since I'm beginning to feel the effects of this universally fatal ailment. But one thing that pervades this book is the (probably unintentional) implication that these these will come, inevitably. It's only a matter of time. I'm not saying they won't, it's just that scientific and technological advances don't just happen. People make them happen, and people can also fail to make them happen in any number of ways. The future may be a strange and wonderful place, but we have to work to get there.
Still, despite an overuse of sage, bumper sticker quotes, I found the book informative. I recommend it for readers with an interest in science and future tech. ( )
  DLMorrese | Oct 14, 2016 |


Don't quit your day job just yet :-D
Good effort. Overly simplified.
( )
  Cal_Clapp | Sep 5, 2016 |
Couldn't finish the audio version. The narrator was fine, but new chapters and new sections were insufficiently marked and I kept losing track of the context and sequence of the discussion. Also, he blames historians for not effectively predicting the future in past books, and says that he and his fellow scientists will be more accurate. But that's a one-sided effort, too. To most accurately predict the future, one would need to consult scientists, developers of technology, and historians, and politicians, philosophers, anthropologists,sociologists, and psychologists.

For example early on (couldn't tell if it was part of the intro, or all or part of the first chapter) he discusses some specific recent failures of predictions, for example the paperless office. He claims that humans have an innate desire to see things for ourselves, and that's why we still print out e-mail. I say that most people who still print out e-mail are older or for some other reason less comfortable with modern devices. We are moving in the direction of paperless offices, just not fast enough for the author.

True, out of that discussion, he does bring up the conceptual link between Hi Tech and Hi Touch, and he does envision that the two strategies will continue to co-exist. But if he'd consulted people from a variety of fields, instead of from just hard sciences, he could have made that discussion a lot more coherent.

I also was frustrated by the lack of ability to check for notes, references, and a bibliography, in the audio edition. I must remember to read non-fiction as an e-book or on paper.
  Cheryl_in_CC_NV | Jun 5, 2016 |
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The "New York Times"-bestselling author of "Physics of the Impossible" offers a stunning and provocative vision of the future, and explains how science will shape human destiny and everyone's daily life by the year 2100.

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